Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Sun, 24 Jul 2016 04:47:06 -0400 THE WILD EYE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46015 <p>(L&rsquo;OCCHIO SELVAGGIO)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the Swedish Film Institute; screened with the permission of Rewind Film S.r.l.<br /><br />MONDO CANE co-director Paolo Cavara&rsquo;s burned-bridges farewell to the Mondo genre which he had helped to invent, and to his former partner, Gualtiero Jacopetti, THE WILD EYE is a mocking, vitriolic satire complete in every detail right down to the swank soundtrack by Gianni Marchetti. Cavara&rsquo;s film opens with an unscrupulous director, Paolo (Philippe Leroy), shooting the last moments of his crew who believe themselves to be on the verge of death from dehydration in the Sahara, then sets off on a globe-trotting journey in search of ever-more-sensational footage, traveling through Bombay and Bali before finally ending &ndash; where else? &ndash; in Vietnam, where Paolo, after colluding in the slaughter of innocents, is finally ready for his close-up.</p> Sunday, July 24 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45952 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Sunday, July 24 FAREWELL UNCLE TOM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46019 <p>(ADDIO ZIO TOM)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.<br /><br />Beginning with the insane idea of making Kyle Onstott&rsquo;s hothouse antebellum novel MANDINGO as though a documentary, Jacopetti and Prosperi set out to reproduce every aspect of the South&rsquo;s &ldquo;peculiar institution,&rdquo; following the movement of human chattel from the slave market to life on the plantation in their signature style, by turns bombastic, lyrical, and leering, before concluding with a baby-smashing invitation to all-out race war. Filmed in Haiti under the sponsorship of dictator &ldquo;Papa&rdquo; Doc Duvalier and taking advantage of the availability of a large pool of black extras willing to work for near-slave wages, it&rsquo;s an unpardonably, unconscionably compromised production &ndash; as well as one of only a handful of movies to appear in the 20th century which dealt with the raw, physical reality of slavery.</p> Sunday, July 24 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45953 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Sunday, July 24 SAVAGE MAN, SAVAGE BEAST http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46022 <p>(ULTIME GRIDA DALLA SAVANA)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the American Genre Film Archive.<br /><br />This was the debut film in what would become an ongoing collaboration between Climati and Morra, who had cut their teeth working with Prosperi and Jacopetti &ndash; rumored to have had more than a little input on this project. SAVAGE MAN, SAVAGE BEAST is perhaps the most visually-arresting of all Mondo films, a rhapsodic, even voluptuous meditation on the various modes of the hunt as practiced by both man and animal. Often-dubious scenes are given a sheen of officialdom by the narration from novelist Alberto Moravia, which takes us from Patagonian plains to African savannah to Aussie outback, with stops most anywhere in the world where the roles of predator and prey are practiced. One of the last great works in the classic poetic, pseudo-encyclopedic Mondo vein, before the rise of the shockumentary.<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />Georges Franju<br />BLOOD OF THE BEASTS / LE SANG DES B&Ecirc;TES<br />(France, 1949, 20 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. In French with English subtitles. Archival print courtesy of the Harvard Film Archive.)<br />Franju&rsquo;s masterpiece of <em>philosophie dans la l&rsquo;abattoir</em>, shot in a Parisian slaughterhouse, combines difficult imagery with an abstract narrative, an approach used for piquant irony by the Mondo filmmakers.</p> Sunday, July 24 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45954 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Sunday, July 24 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45955 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Monday, July 25 SNUFF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46025 <p>Print courtesy of the American Genre Film Archive.<br /><br />&ldquo;The film that could only be made in South America&hellip;where Life is CHEAP,&rdquo; SNUFF began its life as a gore film, SLAUGHTER, made by husband and wife team Roberta and Michael Findlay. Shot in Argentina in 1971 and effectively shelved afterwards, the footage gained a second life when distributor/producer Allan Schackleton, inspired by ubiquitous urban legends about the existence of &ldquo;snuff&rdquo; films, decided to give the ghoulish public what they wanted, tacking on a new ending which purported to show a real-life murder, shot in &ldquo;documentary-style&rdquo; in order to add maximum verisimilitude. A schlock-horror legend, and a landmark in the appropriation of v&eacute;rit&eacute; technique by low-budget genre filmmakers.</p> Monday, July 25 CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46028 <p>&ldquo;I wonder who the real cannibals are?&rdquo; What began with the crude, prankish imposture of SNUFF was refined and perfected in CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST, the definitive film of the Italian cannibal movie boom, and &ndash; for better or worse &ndash; the first fully-realized found-footage horror movie. In a 35mm fiction framing narrative, an NYU academic (Robert Kerman) reviews the recovered 16mm footage of a documentary crew gone missing in the Amazon while shooting their opus THE GREEN INFERNO, and uncovers the behind-the-scenes story of their eventual demises, preceded by staggering violations of documentary ethics and amoral opportunism. &ldquo;The more you rape their senses, the happier they are,&rdquo; says one TV exec, and in following this advice Deodato&rsquo;s noxious film manages to indict and degrade audiences, fellow filmmakers, and even himself.</p> Monday, July 25 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45956 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Monday, July 25 OF THE DEAD / DES MORTS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46031 <p>DES MORTS begins with an American mortician in a crisp white lab coat grooming a dead body &ndash; the first of many visible herein &ndash; cleaning the hands with the intent efficiency of a trained manicurist. Alain Pierre&rsquo;s electronic dirge scores the scene, one of the few instances of non-diegetic music in this otherwise stark, undecorated film. Operating in the globe-trotting spirit of MONDO CANE, DES MORTS visits six countries and three continents. We see funeral processions wending their way towards village cemeteries in Z&eacute;no&rsquo;s native Wallonia and the theatrical ululation at a South Korean wake. But if the filmmakers&rsquo; initial schematic plan was to establish a binary dichotomy reiterating the Jessica Mitford/Evelyn Waugh line of deploring the American Way of Death, it was complicated by the material they&rsquo;ve gathered, and their evident empathy.</p> Tuesday, July 26 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45957 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Tuesday, July 26 THE KILLING OF AMERICA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46006 <p>Print courtesy of the Swedish Film Institute.<br /><br />THE KILLING OF AMERICA begins with a channel-surf atrocity exhibition and a tour of Los Angeles by night that encompasses helicopter views and crime scenes. Voiceover stalwart Chuck Riley, reading the narration in an impassive, clipped style, introduces the basic premise: &ldquo;America is the only industrialized nation with the high murder rate of countries at civil war.&rdquo; The culprit? &ldquo;Guns, and more guns.&rdquo; From a slo-mo replay of the then still-recent non-fatal shooting of Ronald Reagan, we move along to a reproduction of the events leading up to perhaps the most-viewed home movie in history, the Zapruder film. This, we&rsquo;re informed, was &ldquo;the day the American dream of freedom was wedded to the American nightmare of murder.&rdquo; In its call for stricter gun laws the film is nothing if not coherent, and prescient.</p> Tuesday, July 26 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45958 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Tuesday, July 26 THE WILD EYE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46016 <p>(L&rsquo;OCCHIO SELVAGGIO)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the Swedish Film Institute; screened with the permission of Rewind Film S.r.l.<br /><br />MONDO CANE co-director Paolo Cavara&rsquo;s burned-bridges farewell to the Mondo genre which he had helped to invent, and to his former partner, Gualtiero Jacopetti, THE WILD EYE is a mocking, vitriolic satire complete in every detail right down to the swank soundtrack by Gianni Marchetti. Cavara&rsquo;s film opens with an unscrupulous director, Paolo (Philippe Leroy), shooting the last moments of his crew who believe themselves to be on the verge of death from dehydration in the Sahara, then sets off on a globe-trotting journey in search of ever-more-sensational footage, traveling through Bombay and Bali before finally ending &ndash; where else? &ndash; in Vietnam, where Paolo, after colluding in the slaughter of innocents, is finally ready for his close-up.</p> Wednesday, July 27 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45959 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Wednesday, July 27 SKY ABOVE AND MUD BENEATH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46000 <p>(LE CIEL ET LA BOUE)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.<br /><br />SKY ABOVE is a thrilling, adventuresome documentary account of director Gaisseau&rsquo;s rugged overland expedition through the unexplored highlands of Netherlands New Guinea, which brought him into contact with the Asmat, a people still living as though in the Stone Age. The Asmat would shortly find themselves under scrutiny for their possible involvement in the disappearance of young heir Michael C. Rockefeller. The front-page fascination with the Rockefeller case and the Academy Award win for Gaisseau&rsquo;s film signified a public interest in these tenacious &ldquo;primitive&rdquo; cultures and what they might teach us about civilization, and so set the stage for the rise of Mondo.</p> Wednesday, July 27 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45960 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Wednesday, July 27 SAVAGE MAN, SAVAGE BEAST http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46023 <p>(ULTIME GRIDA DALLA SAVANA)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the American Genre Film Archive.<br /><br />This was the debut film in what would become an ongoing collaboration between Climati and Morra, who had cut their teeth working with Prosperi and Jacopetti &ndash; rumored to have had more than a little input on this project. SAVAGE MAN, SAVAGE BEAST is perhaps the most visually-arresting of all Mondo films, a rhapsodic, even voluptuous meditation on the various modes of the hunt as practiced by both man and animal. Often-dubious scenes are given a sheen of officialdom by the narration from novelist Alberto Moravia, which takes us from Patagonian plains to African savannah to Aussie outback, with stops most anywhere in the world where the roles of predator and prey are practiced. One of the last great works in the classic poetic, pseudo-encyclopedic Mondo vein, before the rise of the shockumentary.<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />Georges Franju<br />BLOOD OF THE BEASTS / LE SANG DES B&Ecirc;TES<br />(France, 1949, 20 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. In French with English subtitles. Archival print courtesy of the Harvard Film Archive.)<br />Franju&rsquo;s masterpiece of <em>philosophie dans la l&rsquo;abattoir</em>, shot in a Parisian slaughterhouse, combines difficult imagery with an abstract narrative, an approach used for piquant irony by the Mondo filmmakers.</p> Thursday, July 28 RE-VISIONS: DEAN SNIDER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45980 <p>Subversive, sardonic, and often super-short, the films of Dean Snider (1949-94) defy classification. A San Francisco-based cinema activist and co-founder of the infamous microcinema, No Nothing Cinema, Snider made more than one hundred films between the late 1970s and early 1990s, combining &ldquo;found footage, poetry, animation, garage rock and an aesthetic variously rinky-dink and arty to singular effect&rdquo; (Bill O&rsquo;Driscoll, PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER).<br /><br />Snider&rsquo;s work is notable for its tongue-in-cheek humor, refreshing lack of pretension, and lightning-quick pace. HEY! (1981), for instance, consists of a single, blink-and-you&rsquo;ll-miss-it frame of a bale of hay that lasts all of 0.0417 seconds. PREFERRED PIECE (1982) is one inexplicable minute of a guy talking about an underwhelming modern sculpture. And in STINK (1984), a deadpan voiceover accompanies a mash-up of found footage home movies and travelogues as the narrator spins a sarcastic, hilariously jumbled tale about growing up as a middle-class slacker (&ldquo;Father worked double shifts at the lumber mill sawing entire trees into sawdust for janitors to spread on puke in the school hallways of America&rdquo;).<br /><br />On July 4, 1982, Snider and a group of fellow filmmakers founded the No Nothing Cinema in a former dairy processing facility. With a motto of &ldquo;no censorship, no cross, no crown, hot barbeque, and cold drinks,&rdquo; the No Nothing hosted hundreds of completely free cinema events that featured the work of Bay Area filmmakers as well as music, performance, and visual art. No Nothing reflected Snider&rsquo;s antic, free-wheeling, and mischievous sensibility, qualities that are amply evident in his films as well. More heard of than seen on this coast, or outside San Francisco in general, Snider&rsquo;s work is nothing short of a revelation.<br /><br />&ldquo;During his relatively short lifespan, Snider produced literally hundreds of films. Beyond filmmaking, his gadfly outbursts and philosophical provocations helped spark controversy and stimulate conceptual filmic border-crossings.&rdquo; &ndash;V. Vale and Marian Wallace, RESEARCHPUBS.COM<br /><br />Tonight&rsquo;s program will feature 10 films recently preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, as well as a selection of additional films, presented by filmmaker, musician, and curator Douglas Katelus.<br /><br />HEY! (1981, 0.0417 seconds, 16mm)<br />BORED MEMBERS (1981, 2 min, 16mm)<br />CLOUD NINE (1983, 3 min, 16mm)<br />ISH &amp; VINNY (1982, 18 seconds, 16mm)<br />PREFERRED PIECE (1982, 1 min, 16mm)<br />1984 (1984, 50 seconds, 16mm)<br />BLOTCHER FILM (1981, 30 seconds, 16mm)<br />WAUWATOSA (1978, 2 min, 16mm)<br />LAND WITHOUT TALK (1989, 5 min, 16mm)<br />WITHOUT YOU BABE (1987, 5 min, 16mm)<br /><br /><strong><em>Plus:<br /><br /></em></strong><em></em>TIN CANS ARE MY FAVORITE TREAT (1979, 15 min, 16mm. Courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.)<br />NO NOTHING WOMAN (1984, 1 min, 16mm. Courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.)<br />MY LITTLE BABY (1986, 1.5 min, 35mm. Courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.)<br />A FIELD GUIDE TO WESTERN BIRDS (1981, 23 min, 16mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 70 min.<em></em><strong><em><br /></em></strong></p> Thursday, July 28 MONDO TOPLESS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46010 <p>&ldquo;You&rsquo;ve only dreamed there were women like these &ndash; until now! But they&rsquo;re real!&rdquo; Double-entendre-laden narration and the surf rock stylings of The Aladdins guide viewers through this punchy, gonzo survey of the elite striptease artists of the middle 1960s, a smorgasbord of big, natural talents including Bouncy Babette Bardot (purportedly the fourth cousin of Brigitte) driving topless through San Francisco and the buxotic Darlene Grey go-go dancing in the desert. Meyer&rsquo;s first color film, a five-day wonder cash-in with a distinct satirical bent, MONDO TOPLESS was his answer to early proto-Mondo efforts compiling cabaret acts (EUROPEAN NIGHTS, etc.), with the added inducement of backstage interviews tackling hot-button brassiere-related issues. Shot in &lsquo;Frisco and exotic European ports of call, the latter via footage recycled from Meyer&rsquo;s 1963 EUROPE IN THE RAW!</p> Thursday, July 28 FOR THE PLASMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46075 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />With Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe. Special thanks to Jacob Perlin.<br /><br />In a remote house in Maine, two old friends analyze CCTV footage of the surrounding forest to predict shifts in global financial markets. From this cryptic premise grows a lo-fi mind-bender of intimate scale and startling relevance that flirts with sci-fi and horror conventions even as it subverts them. To the strains of Keiichi Suzuki&rsquo;s electronic score, FOR THE PLASMA juxtaposes pastoral imagery with surveillance technology, every shade and shadow captured in gorgeous 16mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;You&rsquo;re unlikely to see a more peculiar debut than [the] sneakily cryptic FOR THE PLASMA. Set in a solitary lakeside cabin in Maine and its surrounding forests, this strange, muted science fiction story suggests Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING by way of David Lynch. [&hellip;] Sort through the pieces or just glide through its dreamlike state: FOR THE PLASMA offers many pleasures, but no single interpretation, and that open-ended state is a liberating alternative to anything else in recent American cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA is a modest project of big ideas: about solitude, collaboration, conspiracy, magical thinking.&rdquo; &ndash;Melissa Anderson, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;FOR THE PLASMA delivers a dry New England strain of crazy, set in a serene seaside village in Maine. [&hellip;] The smooth yet floaty direction sublimates the rocky, implacable landscape into something disturbingly ethereal.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br /><strong>Co-director Bingham Bryant will be here in person for Q&amp;As after the 7pm screenings on Thurs &amp; Fri, July 21 &amp; 22, and to introduce the 9:15 shows on those nights!</strong></p> Thursday, July 28 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45962 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Friday, July 29 THE KILLING OF AMERICA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46007 <p>Print courtesy of the Swedish Film Institute.<br /><br />THE KILLING OF AMERICA begins with a channel-surf atrocity exhibition and a tour of Los Angeles by night that encompasses helicopter views and crime scenes. Voiceover stalwart Chuck Riley, reading the narration in an impassive, clipped style, introduces the basic premise: &ldquo;America is the only industrialized nation with the high murder rate of countries at civil war.&rdquo; The culprit? &ldquo;Guns, and more guns.&rdquo; From a slo-mo replay of the then still-recent non-fatal shooting of Ronald Reagan, we move along to a reproduction of the events leading up to perhaps the most-viewed home movie in history, the Zapruder film. This, we&rsquo;re informed, was &ldquo;the day the American dream of freedom was wedded to the American nightmare of murder.&rdquo; In its call for stricter gun laws the film is nothing if not coherent, and prescient.</p> Friday, July 29 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45963 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Friday, July 29 FAREWELL UNCLE TOM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46020 <p>(ADDIO ZIO TOM)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.<br /><br />Beginning with the insane idea of making Kyle Onstott&rsquo;s hothouse antebellum novel MANDINGO as though a documentary, Jacopetti and Prosperi set out to reproduce every aspect of the South&rsquo;s &ldquo;peculiar institution,&rdquo; following the movement of human chattel from the slave market to life on the plantation in their signature style, by turns bombastic, lyrical, and leering, before concluding with a baby-smashing invitation to all-out race war. Filmed in Haiti under the sponsorship of dictator &ldquo;Papa&rdquo; Doc Duvalier and taking advantage of the availability of a large pool of black extras willing to work for near-slave wages, it&rsquo;s an unpardonably, unconscionably compromised production &ndash; as well as one of only a handful of movies to appear in the 20th century which dealt with the raw, physical reality of slavery.</p> Friday, July 29 CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46029 <p>&ldquo;I wonder who the real cannibals are?&rdquo; What began with the crude, prankish imposture of SNUFF was refined and perfected in CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST, the definitive film of the Italian cannibal movie boom, and &ndash; for better or worse &ndash; the first fully-realized found-footage horror movie. In a 35mm fiction framing narrative, an NYU academic (Robert Kerman) reviews the recovered 16mm footage of a documentary crew gone missing in the Amazon while shooting their opus THE GREEN INFERNO, and uncovers the behind-the-scenes story of their eventual demises, preceded by staggering violations of documentary ethics and amoral opportunism. &ldquo;The more you rape their senses, the happier they are,&rdquo; says one TV exec, and in following this advice Deodato&rsquo;s noxious film manages to indict and degrade audiences, fellow filmmakers, and even himself.</p> Saturday, July 30 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45964 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Saturday, July 30 MONDO CANE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46003 <p>Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.<br /><br />Released in 1962, MONDO CANE is a leering transcontinental tour, stitching together material shot around the globe: knee-walking drunks in Hamburg&rsquo;s Reeperbahn Strasse; a high-end restaurant in NYC where the hoi polloi gather to dine on insects; the tragic effects of atomic radiation on the wildlife of the Bikini Atoll; and the effects of the bikini on sailors on shore leave. The film takes bounding leaps from one side of the planet to the other, prompted by associative connections between the civilized and the primitive world. Rather than chastening the savage with the example of superior civilization, the cheek-and-jowl positioning of images from the industrialized and undeveloped world serves to show the continuing importance of rites and rituals in both. The purpose of this, it should be said, is not necessarily to elevate the lowly savage, but to place the civilized on the same level &ndash; that of a vast kennel, a dog&rsquo;s world.</p> Saturday, July 30 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45965 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Saturday, July 30 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45966 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Saturday, July 30 THE WILD EYE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46017 <p>(L&rsquo;OCCHIO SELVAGGIO)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the Swedish Film Institute; screened with the permission of Rewind Film S.r.l.<br /><br />MONDO CANE co-director Paolo Cavara&rsquo;s burned-bridges farewell to the Mondo genre which he had helped to invent, and to his former partner, Gualtiero Jacopetti, THE WILD EYE is a mocking, vitriolic satire complete in every detail right down to the swank soundtrack by Gianni Marchetti. Cavara&rsquo;s film opens with an unscrupulous director, Paolo (Philippe Leroy), shooting the last moments of his crew who believe themselves to be on the verge of death from dehydration in the Sahara, then sets off on a globe-trotting journey in search of ever-more-sensational footage, traveling through Bombay and Bali before finally ending &ndash; where else? &ndash; in Vietnam, where Paolo, after colluding in the slaughter of innocents, is finally ready for his close-up.</p> Saturday, July 30 OF THE DEAD / DES MORTS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46032 <p>DES MORTS begins with an American mortician in a crisp white lab coat grooming a dead body &ndash; the first of many visible herein &ndash; cleaning the hands with the intent efficiency of a trained manicurist. Alain Pierre&rsquo;s electronic dirge scores the scene, one of the few instances of non-diegetic music in this otherwise stark, undecorated film. Operating in the globe-trotting spirit of MONDO CANE, DES MORTS visits six countries and three continents. We see funeral processions wending their way towards village cemeteries in Z&eacute;no&rsquo;s native Wallonia and the theatrical ululation at a South Korean wake. But if the filmmakers&rsquo; initial schematic plan was to establish a binary dichotomy reiterating the Jessica Mitford/Evelyn Waugh line of deploring the American Way of Death, it was complicated by the material they&rsquo;ve gathered, and their evident empathy.</p> Sunday, July 31 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45967 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Sunday, July 31 AFRICA BLOOD AND GUTS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46013 <p>(AFRICA ADDIO)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the Swedish Film Institute.<br /><br />Gualtiero Jacopetti and Franco Prosperi&rsquo;s widely maligned and misunderstood follow-up to MONDO CANE, AFRICA ADDIO begins with the ceremonious exit of the British government from Nairobi, Kenya, on December 12, 1963, and proceeds to offer a collage of scenes from around the African continent at the moment when all but the most stubborn of European powers have begun to pull up stakes on their colonial holdings. Occasional bits of comic relief &ndash; a public slide-show teaching a new black supremacist curriculum, tribal warriors receiving government-issue boxer shorts from the Sudanese Legion of Decency, a couple of lions being interrupted in flagrante delicto by tourists honking their car horns &ndash; are few and far apart. The presiding tone of AFRICA ADDIO is one of an all-encompassing mournfulness for both the departing colonials and for their former black subjects who, as the voice-over postulates, have been left to their own devices without sufficient preparation for self-governance.<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />Jean Rouch<br />THE MAD MASTERS / LES MA&Icirc;TRES FOUS<br />(France, 1955, 28 min, 16mm-to-digital. In French with English subtitles.)<br />Rouch&rsquo;s controversial short film documents a meeting of Africans participant in the Hauka movement, congregating to enter into a trance-like state and mockingly mimic their British colonial administrators. The game of cultural compare and contrast is a theme that would recur in later Mondo films.</p> Sunday, July 31 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45968 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Sunday, July 31 SNUFF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46026 <p>Print courtesy of the American Genre Film Archive.<br /><br />&ldquo;The film that could only be made in South America&hellip;where Life is CHEAP,&rdquo; SNUFF began its life as a gore film, SLAUGHTER, made by husband and wife team Roberta and Michael Findlay. Shot in Argentina in 1971 and effectively shelved afterwards, the footage gained a second life when distributor/producer Allan Schackleton, inspired by ubiquitous urban legends about the existence of &ldquo;snuff&rdquo; films, decided to give the ghoulish public what they wanted, tacking on a new ending which purported to show a real-life murder, shot in &ldquo;documentary-style&rdquo; in order to add maximum verisimilitude. A schlock-horror legend, and a landmark in the appropriation of v&eacute;rit&eacute; technique by low-budget genre filmmakers.</p> Sunday, July 31 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45969 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Sunday, July 31 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-45970 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Monday, August 01 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-45971 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Monday, August 01 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-45972 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Tuesday, August 02 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-45973 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Tuesday, August 02 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-46084 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, August 03 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-45974 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Wednesday, August 03 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-45975 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Wednesday, August 03 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-45976 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Thursday, August 04 SHOW & TELL: JOHN WIESE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-46090 <p>An artist and composer living in Los Angeles, John Wiese began experimenting with recording as a teenager and has since gone on to become a highly respected figure, both in the academic world of contemporary sound art as well as within the international experimental music underground. His music ranges from the serene and sublime to the frenetic and irregular, a sign of his ability to adapt and utilize a plethora of sounds to build captivating aural works. As a performer and recording artist, his expertise in composition, texture, and experimentation with sound is not restricted to work under his own name. Wiese is also known for his influential grind/noisecore band Sissy Spacek, extreme electronics unit LHD, and for his numerous collaborations with some of the finest experimental artists from around the world. He is also an accomplished visual and graphic artist with a long list of exhibitions and printed materials published across the globe. For his program at Anthology, Wiese will present eight film pieces that incorporate elements of documentation, narrative, and abstraction, using image, sound, and often silence, to create a visual score for both real and imagined sound.<br /><br />SISSY SPACEK (2011, 16.5 min, digital, silent)<br />THE TENSES WITH JOHN WIESE (2014, 12.5 min, digital)<br />UNTITLED (2014, 6.5 min, digital, silent)<br />LEATHER BATH (2013, 6.5 min, digital)<br />SISSY SPACEK&mdash;MATA GALLERY (2014, 1.5 min, digital)<br />I BET YOU CAN&rsquo;T FINISH THAT GLASS OF WATER (2014, 10 min, digital, silent)<br />THREE GLASS BOTTLES (2014, 30 sec, Super 8mm-to-digital, b&amp;w)<br />A SPECIFIC POINT IN A CONTINUOUS WHOLE (2014, 19.5 min, digital, silent)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Thursday, August 04 HOMO SAPIENS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-45977 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by KimStim.<br /><br />The latest film by Austrian documentary filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter (PRIPYAT, OUR DAILY BREAD, ABENDLAND) is a typically masterful, disturbing work, scary in its compositional perfection and unblinking depiction of mankind&rsquo;s effect on the planet. Where Geyrhalter&rsquo;s eye for the dystopic has brought certain of his earlier works to the precipice of a kind of documentary science fiction (in OUR DAILY BREAD for instance, which paints a highly unsettling portrait of the modern food industry), HOMO SAPIENS goes even further. Focusing his gaze on modern ruins, and with nary a human being in sight, Geyrhalter has made a film that is ostensibly an essay on abandoned structures and spaces, of factories and hospitals and homes left empty and crumbling. But marked by the profound absence of life, and recording manmade structures that are gradually being reclaimed by nature, it registers as something like a documentary portrait of a post-human world, an ode to humanity as seen from the distant future. A film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence, HOMO SAPIENS questions the meaning of human existence in relation to the world we live in.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nikolaus Geyrhalter&rsquo;s fantastical HOMO SAPIENS depicts a disquieting scenario whereby the world made by people is slowly won back by nature: it is science fiction and documentary in equal measure, equal parts contemporary and post-apocalyptic.&rdquo; &ndash;BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;From a frightening distance and with supreme indifference, we examine the remnants of this world as if we were archaeologists from the future or from a different world, trying to decipher an alien civilization. Everything turns into a cipher, a sign, a code that promises understanding: they must have been megalomaniacs, those humans &ndash; extravagant, imposing, and full of themselves. In HOMO SAPIENS, we confront the absurdity of such self-images once they are subject to decay. We would like to believe that this film tells of a distant future, but we know that its images were generated in the here and now.&rdquo; &ndash;Alejandro Bachmann</p> Thursday, August 04 EC: IVAN THE TERRIBLE: PARTS 1 & 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-46091 <p>(IVAN GROZNY)<br /><br />&ldquo;The first time in history a man has committed suicide by cinema,&rdquo; quipped Dovzhenko. A state-sanctioned production, Ivan&rsquo;s opulent furs and jewels color the black-and-white machinations by a demonic Czar bent on making his subjects&rsquo; lives a living hell &ndash; a statement pointed with outrage directly at Stalin.</p> Friday, August 05 EC: BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-46092 <p>(BRONENOSETS POTEMKIN)<br /><br />Eisenstein&rsquo;s constructivist montage and rigid, super-structured plot share equal weight with a seemingly spontaneous, inflamed emotion.</p> Saturday, August 06 EC: STRIKE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2016#showing-46093 <p>(STACHKA)<br /><br />Eisenstein&rsquo;s interest in the Freudian father complex drives this psychological scenario in which non-actors step forward to acknowledge the viewer, illustrating Eisenstein&rsquo;s desire to penetrate to the heart of cinema, sidestepping realism by &lsquo;being real.&rsquo; Governmental restrictions made STRIKE the only completed film of a series intended to portray the road to revolution.</p> Saturday, August 06