Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Sun, 01 Mar 2015 15:52:49 -0500 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43869 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Sunday, March 01 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43870 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Sunday, March 01 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43871 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Sunday, March 01 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43872 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Monday, March 02 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43873 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Monday, March 02 FLAHERTY NYC: PROGRAM 4: CHECKPOINTS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43806 <p>A pairing of films that give a close-up glimpse into the passage of restricted goods into restricted spaces. Massimo D&rsquo;Anolfi and Marina Parenti&rsquo;s IL CASTELLO is a behind-the-scenes look at the Malpensa Airport told over the course of a year, as cargo &ndash; both humans and goods &ndash; are methodically screened for entry. Brett Story&rsquo;s CLEAR AND NO SCREWS profiles SendAPackage, a wholesale warehouse founded by an ex-prisoner in the Bronx where all of the items sold meet the 36-page list of rules regulating the packages allowed into the New York prison system.<br /><br />Massimo D&rsquo;Anolfi &amp; Martina Parenti IL CASTELLO (THE CASTLE) (2012, 100 min, digital)<br />Brett Story CLEAR AND NO SCREWS (2014, 5 min, digital)<br />Total running time: ca. 110 min.<br /><br /><strong><em>Story will be here in person.</em></strong></p> <p>This project is a collaboration with Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts, and made possible with generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and The Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation.<br />This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. <br /><strong></strong></p> Tuesday, March 03 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43874 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Tuesday, March 03 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43875 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Tuesday, March 03 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-44014 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, March 04 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43876 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Wednesday, March 04 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43877 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Wednesday, March 04 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43878 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Thursday, March 05 YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43879 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Andrew Betzer&rsquo;s acclaimed, instantly identifiable short films, including SMALL APARTMENTS (Grand Jury Prize winner at SXSW) and JOHN WAYNE HATED HORSES, have consistently defied viewer expectations with their dark humor, disarming poignancy, and total disregard for happy endings. YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY marks Betzer&rsquo;s notable debut as a feature filmmaker, and solidly delivers on his early promise.<br /><br />Older (Gabriel Croft), a young man of 20 years, escapes incarceration and seeks out his little brother, Younger, age 10 (Hale Lytle). Clearly a bad influence, Older gets them involved in the &lsquo;accidental&rsquo; killing of a young girl and makes things worse by fleeing the scene of the crime. They hide out until their mother can come to help, but rather than turn them over to the police, she aids in their escape. On the road, they have a series of run-ins with estranged family and unusual characters, all of whom remind them just how out-on-a-limb things have become for the ill-prepared duo. Upon their arrival at their estranged father&rsquo;s desolate compound on the seashore, tensions boil over when Dad forces Older and Younger to join him and his military-loving buddies on their annual trip to a remote forest to reenact the Vietnam War.<br /><br />With minimal dialogue and an episodic approach, YOUNG BODIES HEAL QUICKLY is a slippery film that manages to be completely engrossing and at the same time thoroughly unpredictable. Driven by compelling performances from the young leads and actress Kate Lyn Sheil (LISTEN UP PHILIP, THE COLOR WHEEL), as well as distinctive camerawork by Sean Price Williams, the film is less a coming-of-age tale than a mystifying parable about familial bonds and the substantial costs paid for youthful mistakes.<br /><br />&ldquo;Most movies that begin with a sudden tragic event telegraph the consequences far ahead. Not this captivating debut, in which two fugitive brothers &ndash; the older one a seemingly stunted brute, the younger one a resilient waif &ndash; meander through a series of strange encounters en route to a reunion with their long-lost father, a war-reenactment obsessive. Beautiful 16mm cinematography savors both landscape and the intimacies of willful characters who slowly reveal their mysteries.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Dollar, WALL STREET JOURNAL</p> Thursday, March 05 THE LAST SUNSET http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43902 <p>Screenplay by Dalton Trumbo, based on the novel by Howard Rigsby. With Rock Hudson, Kirk Douglas, Dorothy Malone, Joseph Cotton, Carol Lynley, and Neville Brand.<br /><br />&ldquo;Although Dalton Trumbo considered THE LAST SUNSET his worst script, this fascinatingly overripe western is noteworthy for Robert Aldrich&rsquo;s usual visual panache and a baroque plot that looks forward to the revisionist &lsquo;last westerns&rsquo; of the late 1960s and early 70s. After completing the script for SPARTACUS, Trumbo, working again for Kirk Douglas&rsquo;s Byrna Productions, received a post-blacklist screen credit. The convoluted plot involves the attempts of the upright sheriff Dan Stribling (Rock Hudson) to apprehend outlaw Brendan O&rsquo;Malley (Kirk Douglas), responsible for the murder of Stribling&rsquo;s brother-in-law. O&rsquo;Malley has been lured to Mexico to reignite his romance with Belle Breckinridge under the ruse of working on the ranch of her alcoholic husband John (Joseph Cotten). Ultimately smitten with Belle&rsquo;s daughter Melissa (Carol Lynley), O&rsquo;Malley&rsquo;s misplaced passion results in a particularly audacious plot twist. THE LAST SUNSET, even while straining credulity and reworking themes borrowed from Greek tragedy with mixed results, is a precursor of the sexual frankness that would permeate genre films of the late 60s.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Porton</p> Friday, March 06 8MM EXPERIMENTS BY KARPO GODINA AND DAVORIN MARC http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43936 <p>SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF SLOVENIA PRESENTS:<br /><br />All films preserved/restored by the Slovenian Cinematheque, Ljubljana, and selected by Jurij Meden.<br /><br />Karpo Godina, arguably the most internationally acclaimed Slovenian filmmaker and cinematographer, launched his career in the mid-sixties with a quick succession of independently produced 8mm experimental shorts, predominantly designed to question everything he was being taught at the state film academy. DIVJAD, PES and ANNO PASSATO, which comprise only a small part of this succession, are primarily exercises in motion: constant motion of the gaze, constant motion in front of the gaze, motion in all known and unknown directions, all linked together through seemingly random editing and mere hints of lustful stories. In retrospect it seems as if Godina had to go through this somewhat naive, romantic, frantic phase in order to quickly arrive at what he became famous for: extracting as much (political) action and dynamics as possible from meticulously framed, perfectly still images (see GRATINIRANI MOZAK PUPILIJE FERKEVERK). Emerging a decade after the hairy hippie Godina, the post-punk Davorin Marc remains very much a subject for further research. Notoriously reclusive and with over 150 Super-8mm and 16mm films under his belt, he modestly describes his work as &ldquo;small films,&rdquo; period, pushing the notion of understatement to a radical, bleeding new extreme.<br /><br />SLOVENIAN CINEMATHEQUE<br />Slovenian Cinematheque (SC) started its work in 1994, was officially recognized by the Slovenian government in 1996 and became a full member of the International Federation of Film Archives in 2012. SC is primarily a film museum, dedicated to thinking about cinema in all possible ways and shapes beyond commercial imperatives. SC treats cinema as a medium, a (historical) record, an art, a (not necessarily popular) culture, a tool of expression. SC is involved in film programming, preservation, publishing, research, and education. In 2009 SC started its very own special film collection, focused on the previously almost completely neglected avant-garde cinema from the region.<br /><br />Karpo Godina &amp; Jure Pervanje GAME / DIVJAD (1965, 6 min, 8mm-to-35mm, b&amp;w)<br />Karpo Godina &amp; Mario Ur&scaron;ić DOG / PES (1965, 8 min, 8mm-to-35mm, b&amp;w)<br />Karpo Godina A.P. (ANNO PASSATO) (1966, 5 min, 8mm-to-35mm, b&amp;w)<br />Karpo Godina THE GRATINATED BRAINS OF PUPILIJA FERKEVERK / GRATINIRANI MOZAK PUPILIJE FERKEVERK (1970, 15 min, 35mm)<br />Davorin Marc BITE ME. ONCE ALREADY. / UGRIZNI ME. ŽE ENKRAT. (1978/80, 1.5 min, Super 8mm, silent)<br />Davorin Marc SLAUGHTER AHOY / EJ KLANJE (1981, 16 min, Super 8mm)<br />Davorin Marc FEAR IN THE CITY (1181 DAYS LATER OR SMELL OF RATS) / PAURA IN CITTA (1181 DNI POZNEJE ALI VONJ PO PODGANAH) (1984, 21 min, Super 8mm-to-35mm)<br /><br />Plus:<br />Davorin Marc PIKNIK (25 SECONDS PER FRAME) (2013/14, 11 min, Super 8mm-to-digital, silent)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Friday, March 06 CRY OF BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43906 <p>Screenplay by Bernard Gordon, based on the novel by Benjamin Appel. With Van Heflin, Rita Moreno, and James MacArthur.<br /><br />&ldquo;The overlong source novel for CRY OF BATTLE focused on Filipino leadership of the U.S.-backed guerrilla movement against Japanese occupation of the Philippines during WWII. Adapting it offered Gordon a rare &lsquo;chance to write a film script that would have something to say about American attitudes toward the native people in those days,&rsquo; he wrote in his memoir &lsquo;Hollywood Exile, or How I Learned to Love the Blacklist,&rsquo; while highlighting the contribution &lsquo;of the Filipinos in the struggle against the Japanese.&rsquo; Irving Lerner, loosely associated with the Frontier Films documentary collective in the 1930s, shot the film realistically in and around Manila, with American leads and distinguished Filipino actors. Bosley Crowther rave-reviewed the low-budget film in the October 12, 1963, New York Times (&lsquo;acerbic and action-charged&rsquo;), marking Gordon&rsquo;s first on-screen credit after a decade of operating under fronts with as much prolificacy as Dalton Trumbo. CRY OF BATTLE&rsquo;s other claim to fame: it was showing in the Dallas theater where Lee Harvey Oswald was apprehended on November 22, 1963. A snippet can be glimpsed in Oliver Stone&rsquo;s JFK.&rdquo; &ndash;Patrick McGilligan</p> Friday, March 06 THE CHASE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43909 <p>Screenplay by Lillian Hellman, based on the play by Horton Foote. With Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda, Robert Redford, E.G. Marshall, Angie Dickinson, Janice Rule, Miriam Hopkins, Robert Duvall, and James Fox.<br /><br />&ldquo;Based on Horton Foote&rsquo;s play, Lillian Hellman&rsquo;s screenplay was reworked &ndash; at the behest of producer Sam Spiegel &ndash; by both Michael Wilson and Ivan Moffat. In a 1993 interview with CINEASTE, Arthur Penn complained that he wasn&rsquo;t able to oversee the film&rsquo;s editing and bemoaned the fact that Spiegel cut many of star Marlon Brando&rsquo;s ingenious improvisations. Yet, despite these mishaps, THE CHASE, with its unvarnished depiction of Southern violence, paved the way for pivotal films of the 1960s &ndash; especially Penn&rsquo;s own BONNIE AND CLYDE. Robert Redford, in an early major role, plays Bubber Reeves, a convict on the run after a prison break. Wrongly imprisoned for murder, Bubber&rsquo;s escape exacerbates tensions in the small Texas town where he&rsquo;s viewed with suspicion, and where his wife Anna (Jane Fonda) is conducting an affair with the son of the region&rsquo;s wealthiest man. In an intriguing reversal of the usual stereotype, Brando plays a progressive sheriff at odds with local racist vigilantes.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Porton<br /><br />&ldquo;Violence is a subject that an artist who is intuitively and intellectually alive to the world in which he exists can scarcely avoid today; and if there is a more responsible treatment of it anywhere in the cinema, I have yet to see it.&rdquo; &ndash;Robin Wood on THE CHASE</p> Saturday, March 07 EC: SONGS 1-14 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43997 <p>&ldquo;SONG 1: Portrait of a lady. SONGS 2 &amp; 3: Fire and a mind&rsquo;s movement in remembering. SONG 4: Three girls playing with a ball. Hand painted. SONG 5: A childbirth song. SONG 6: The painted veil via moth-death. SONG 7: San Francisco. SONG 8: Sea creatures. SONG 9: Wedding source and substance. SONG 10: Sitting around. SONG 11: Fires, windows, an insect, a lyre of rain scratches. SONG 12: Verticals and shadows caught in glass traps. SONG 13: A travel song of scenes and horizontals. SONG 14: Molds, paints and crystals.&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.</p> Saturday, March 07 FAIL-SAFE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43913 <p>Screenplay by Walter Bernstein, based on the novel by Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler. With Henry Fonda, Dan O&rsquo;Herlihy, Walter Matthau, Frank Overton, Fritz Weaver, Larry Hagman, William Hansen, Sorrell Booke, Dom DeLuise, and Dana Elcar.<br /><br />&ldquo;Bernstein got to know Lumet, formerly a child actor with the Yiddish Art Theatre, when Lumet was an assistant director to Martin Ritt on CHARLIE WILD, PRIVATE EYE, a half-hour TV show Bernstein wrote under &lsquo;fronts&rsquo; in 1950-51. Bernstein would do some of his finest work with these simpatico friends, Ritt and Lumet. A writer&rsquo;s writer, Bernstein boasts one of the richest of resum&eacute;s, and seems as comfortable with tense uncompromising subjects, sweeping recreations of history, and, especially in the 1970s, philandering romantic comedies. All his films are social critiques, and his lifelong attention to the military-industrial complex is followed through in DOOMSDAY GUN, his 1994 HBO film with Frank Langella as a supergun genius caught between Israel, Iraq, and the CIA, and something of a bookend to FAIL-SAFE. FAIL-SAFE is one of the tensest of his 1960s credits, a disarmament parable that is splendidly entertaining and disturbing in equal parts. &lsquo;DR. STRANGELOVE without the humor,&rsquo; in Danny Peary&rsquo;s apt phrase.&rdquo; &ndash;Patrick McGilligan</p> Saturday, March 07 CROATIAN AVANT-GARDE FILMMAKERS OF THE 1960s http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43938 <p>SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF CROATIA PRESENTS:<br /><br />All films preserved/restored by the Croatian Film Association and Croatian Film Archives (Croatian State Archives), and selected by Diana Nenadić (Croatian Film Association).<br /><br />Along with Mihovil Pansini, Ante Verzotti, and a few others, the filmmakers represented in this program are the most prominent members of the enormously vibrant Croatian experimental scene of the 1960s. All of them were members of the amateur cine-clubs that formed in all the major cities of Yugoslavia at the time, as well as prominent participants of the unique festival of experimental film &ndash; the Genre Film Festival (GEFF, 1963-70), based in Zagreb &ndash; which was the most important gathering point for &lsquo;film researchers&rsquo; and other independent filmmakers from Yugoslavia. Sometimes they collaborated (Petek and Gotovac co-directed some of their early works, Gotovac starred in Martinac&rsquo;s and Zafranović&rsquo;s works, and Zafranović was Martinac&rsquo;s favorite actor), but despite these links their approach to cinematic experiments differed greatly. Thus, Petek&rsquo;s early work represents a prototype of the so-called anti-film, a very influential concept launched by Zagreb experimentalists in the early 1960s, which was both the key driving force and thematic focus of the first GEFF. Gotovac&rsquo;s films anticipated the structural film movement, while Martinac embodied a poetic-meditative orientation that has been the hallmark of the so-called Split Film Circle, which also includes Zafranović, a filmmaker more inclined to fiction and proto-narrative forms. Both the amateur and the professional stages of their work were related in various ways to the Croatian Film Association, whose Archives, founded in 1974, preserve their amateur shorts and distribute professional ones produced by Filmski autorski studio.<br /><br />Vladimir Petek ENCOUNTER / SRETANJE (1963, 5 min, 35mm, b&amp;w)<br />Tomislav Gotovac THE FORENOON OF A FAUN / PRIJE PODNE JEDNOG FAUNA (1963, 8 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Tomislav Gotovac STRAIGHT LINE (STEVENS-DUKE) / PRAVAC (STEVENS-DUKE) (1964, 10 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Tomislav Gotovac CIRCLE (JUTKEVICH-COUNT) / KRUŽNICA (JUTKEVIČ-COUNT) (1964, 12 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Ivan Martinac I&rsquo;M MAD (1967, 5 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm)<br />Ivan Martinac FOCUS (1967, 7 min, 35mm, b&amp;w)<br />Lordan Zafranović PEOPLE (IN PASSING) II / LJUDI (U PROLAZU) II (1967, 11 min, 35mm, b&amp;w)<br />Lordan Zafranović AFTERNOON (THE GUN) / POSLIJE PODNE (PU&Scaron;KA) (1968, 15 min, 35mm, b&amp;w)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Saturday, March 07 SEMI-TOUGH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43917 <p>Screenplay by Walter Bernstein and an uncredited Ring Lardner Jr., based on the novel by Dan Jenkins. With Burt Reynolds, Kris Kristofferson, Jill Clayburgh, Lotte Lenya, Carl Weathers, and Brian Dennehy.<br /><br />&ldquo;SEMI-TOUGH is the better known of Walter Bernstein&rsquo;s two neo-screwball comedies for Michael Ritchie, &lsquo;one of those rare directors,&rsquo; as Vincent Canby wrote, &lsquo;who is able to look at Middle America critically without being especially outraged or even surprised.&rsquo; (The other Bernstein-Ritchie collaboration, AN ALMOST PERFECT AFFAIR from 1979, a film-biz satire set in Cannes, is also worthy of revival.) A dream cast romps through this free-wheeling send-up of professional sports, celebrity, and monogamy. SEMI-TOUGH would make the perfect double bill with M*A*S*H (written by blacklistee Ring Lardner Jr.) with its anarchic football climax. &lsquo;Things like THE MOLLY MAGUIRES and THE FRONT, which came from scratch, are very important to me and mean a lot to me,&rsquo; Walter Bernstein said in &lsquo;Backstory 3: Interviews with Screenwriters of the 60s.&rsquo; &lsquo;But so does SEMI-TOUGH, although it came from a book. Michael and I threw out the story and wrote one of our own. Michael and I did our own movie, just like Marty [Ritt] and I did our own movies.&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;Patrick McGilligan</p> Saturday, March 07 THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43920 <p>Screenplay by Ben Barzman, Basilio Franchina, and Philip Yordan. With Sophia Loren, Stephen Boyd, Alec Guinness, James Mason, Christopher Plummer, Anthony Quayle, John Ireland, and Omar Sharif.<br /><br />The second of the two Samuel Bronston historical super-productions to be directed by Anthony Mann (after EL CID), both of which were treated with extreme condescension in their day but have been increasingly recognized as major achievements, THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE is arguably the greater of the two. A darker, more intricately structured film than EL CID, FALL somehow succeeds as both a big-budget, visually astonishing spectacle animated by a genuine interest in Roman civilization, and a sophisticated, uncompromising inquiry into the nature of power. Best known for his collaborations with fellow blacklistee Joseph Losey in exile in Europe, Ben Barzman co-wrote both FALL and EL CID. In both cases he worked with Philip Yordan, a mysterious and controversial figure in the annals of the blacklist &ndash; the most famous/notorious &lsquo;front&rsquo; of the era, his name appeared on numerous films for which scholars continue to debate the true authorship.</p> Sunday, March 08 EC: STAN BRAKHAGE PGM 3 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43998 <p>All films are silent.<br />LOVING (1956, 4 min, 16mm)<br />PASHT (1965, 5 min, 16mm)<br />FIRE OF WATERS (1965, 10 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, sound)<br />THE HORSEMAN, THE WOMAN AND THE MOTH (1968, 19 min, 16mm)<br />THE WEIR-FALCON SAGA (1970, 29 min, 16mm)<br />SEXUAL MEDITATION #1: MOTEL (1970, 7 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />SEXUAL MEDITATION: ROOM WITH A VIEW (1971, 4 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />THE SHORES OF PHOS: A FABLE (1972, 10 min, 16mm)<br />A selection from some of Brakhage&rsquo;s most densely mysterious works.<br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.</p> Sunday, March 08 THE EXPERIMENTAL FILM MOVEMENT IN SERBIA: FORMATIVE YEARS (1950s-60s) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43940 <p>All films preserved/restored by the Academic Film Center, Student City Cultural Center, Belgrade, and selected by Miodrag Mi&scaron;a Milo&scaron;ević.<br /><br />With the establishment of Cine Clubs in Yugoslavia after WWII, the filmmakers at the front ranks of experimental (and later on professional) cinema in Serbia in the 1950s and the beginning of the 1960s &ndash; including Du&scaron;an Makavejev, Živojin Pavlović, Vojislav Kokan Rakonjac, and Želimir Žilnik &ndash; created a number of films which used narrative experimentation to pose questions related to the essence of the socialist social system. Their professional films, made during the 1960s, displayed a deep social and political engagement that strongly shook the existing socialist society, and won the movement the name &ldquo;Black Wave&rdquo; (Cinema Noir) in Yugoslavia.<br /><br />His meeting with Petar Arandjelović on the GEFF Festival led Tomislav Gotovac to Belgrade, where in 1964 the two of them created the famous structural film trilogy &ndash; STRAIGHT LINE (STEVENS-DUKE), BLUE RIDER (GODARD-ART), and CIRCLE (JUTKEVIČ-COUNT) &ndash; which would completely transform the previously held understanding of experimental film. Film as a medium of expression and film in which the structure plays the dominant role were the most widespread in the 1960s and 70s in Belgrade. Authors like Zoran Popović, Slobodan &Scaron;ijan, and Ljubomir &Scaron;imunić originated from artistic circles and began to organize private screenings in their own homes of their films, which explored diverse visual structures. Vjekoslav Nakić, Nikola Djurić, and Radoslav Vladić created films with pure structures and atmospheres, which for a certain period of time proliferated at the festivals of experimental film in Yugoslavia. Ivan Obrenov and Bojan Jovanović, through the predominant post-modernist style of their works, again (in the spirit of the &ldquo;Black Wave&rdquo;) began to pose questions related to the topics of unfinished revolutions and neo-colonialism. And at the beginning of the 1980s, Miroslav Bata Petrović, with his PURE FILM, MEMENTO OF GEFF, would deal with the results of the materialist approach to film.<br /><br />ACADEMIC FILM CENTER, STUDENT CITY CULTURAL CENTER, BELGRADE<br />The Academic Cine Club was founded in 1958, and since 1976 it has been in operation as The Academic Film Center in the Student City Cultural Center in Belgrade. In its Alternative Film Archives, it keeps and distributes films that are of significance to the history of experimental cinema in Serbia.<br /><br /><strong><em>For the two Serbian programs, all the films will be shown digitally, due to the fragility and uniqueness of the prints; original formats are listed below.<br /><br /></em></strong>FORMATIVE YEARS (1950s-60s)<br />Du&scaron;an Makavejev ANTONIO&rsquo;S BROKEN MIRROR / ANTONIJEVO RAZBIJENO OGLEDALO (1957, 11 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Živojin Pavlović TRYPTICH ON MATTER AND DEATH / TRIPTIH O MATERIJI I SMRTI (1960, 9 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Vojislav Kokan Rakonjac (THE WALL / ZID 1960, 8 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Dragoslav Lazić SMOKE AND WATER / DIM I VODA (1962, 12 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Sava Trifković ARMS IN THE PURPLE DISTANCE / RUKE LJUBIČASTIH DALJINA (1962, 11 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Petar Arandjelović ECSTASY / EKSTAZA (1963, 5.5 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Tomislav Gotovac BLUE RIDER (GODARD-ART) / PLAVI JAHAČ (GODARD-ART) (1964, 14 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Sunday, March 08 SEMI-TOUGH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43918 <p>Screenplay by Walter Bernstein and an uncredited Ring Lardner Jr., based on the novel by Dan Jenkins. With Burt Reynolds, Kris Kristofferson, Jill Clayburgh, Lotte Lenya, Carl Weathers, and Brian Dennehy.<br /><br />&ldquo;SEMI-TOUGH is the better known of Walter Bernstein&rsquo;s two neo-screwball comedies for Michael Ritchie, &lsquo;one of those rare directors,&rsquo; as Vincent Canby wrote, &lsquo;who is able to look at Middle America critically without being especially outraged or even surprised.&rsquo; (The other Bernstein-Ritchie collaboration, AN ALMOST PERFECT AFFAIR from 1979, a film-biz satire set in Cannes, is also worthy of revival.) A dream cast romps through this free-wheeling send-up of professional sports, celebrity, and monogamy. SEMI-TOUGH would make the perfect double bill with M*A*S*H (written by blacklistee Ring Lardner Jr.) with its anarchic football climax. &lsquo;Things like THE MOLLY MAGUIRES and THE FRONT, which came from scratch, are very important to me and mean a lot to me,&rsquo; Walter Bernstein said in &lsquo;Backstory 3: Interviews with Screenwriters of the 60s.&rsquo; &lsquo;But so does SEMI-TOUGH, although it came from a book. Michael and I threw out the story and wrote one of our own. Michael and I did our own movie, just like Marty [Ritt] and I did our own movies.&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;Patrick McGilligan</p> Sunday, March 08 THE EXPERIMENTAL FILM MOVEMENT IN SERBIA: YEARS OF STRUCTURE (1960s-80s) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43942 <p>All films preserved/restored by the Academic Film Center, Student City Cultural Center, Belgrade, and selected by Miodrag Mi&scaron;a Milo&scaron;ević.<br /><br />With the establishment of Cine Clubs in Yugoslavia after WWII, the filmmakers at the front ranks of experimental (and later on professional) cinema in Serbia in the 1950s and the beginning of the 1960s &ndash; including Du&scaron;an Makavejev, Živojin Pavlović, Vojislav Kokan Rakonjac, and Želimir Žilnik &ndash; created a number of films which used narrative experimentation to pose questions related to the essence of the socialist social system. Their professional films, made during the 1960s, displayed a deep social and political engagement that strongly shook the existing socialist society, and won the movement the name &ldquo;Black Wave&rdquo; (Cinema Noir) in Yugoslavia.<br /><br />His meeting with Petar Arandjelović on the GEFF Festival led Tomislav Gotovac to Belgrade, where in 1964 the two of them created the famous structural film trilogy &ndash; STRAIGHT LINE (STEVENS-DUKE), BLUE RIDER (GODARD-ART), and CIRCLE (JUTKEVIČ-COUNT) &ndash; which would completely transform the previously held understanding of experimental film. Film as a medium of expression and film in which the structure plays the dominant role were the most widespread in the 1960s and 70s in Belgrade. Authors like Zoran Popović, Slobodan &Scaron;ijan, and Ljubomir &Scaron;imunić originated from artistic circles and began to organize private screenings in their own homes of their films, which explored diverse visual structures. Vjekoslav Nakić, Nikola Djurić, and Radoslav Vladić created films with pure structures and atmospheres, which for a certain period of time proliferated at the festivals of experimental film in Yugoslavia. Ivan Obrenov and Bojan Jovanović, through the predominant post-modernist style of their works, again (in the spirit of the &ldquo;Black Wave&rdquo;) began to pose questions related to the topics of unfinished revolutions and neo-colonialism. And at the beginning of the 1980s, Miroslav Bata Petrović, with his PURE FILM, MEMENTO OF GEFF, would deal with the results of the materialist approach to film.<br /><br />ACADEMIC FILM CENTER, STUDENT CITY CULTURAL CENTER, BELGRADE<br />The Academic Cine Club was founded in 1958, and since 1976 it has been in operation as The Academic Film Center in the Student City Cultural Center in Belgrade. In its Alternative Film Archives, it keeps and distributes films that are of significance to the history of experimental cinema in Serbia.<br /><br /><strong><em>For the two Serbian programs, all the films will be shown digitally, due to the fragility and uniqueness of the prints; original formats are listed below.<br /><br /></em></strong>YEARS OF STRUCTURE (1960s-80s)<br />Zoran Popović HEAD &ndash; CIRCLE / GLAVA &ndash; KRUG (1968-69, 5 min, 8mm)<br />Vjekoslav Nakić COMPOSITION / KOMPOZICIJA (1970, 6 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Slobodan &Scaron;ijan THE GARDEN OF FORKING PATHS / VRT SA STAZAMA &Scaron;TO SE RAČVAJU (1971, 4 min, 8mm)<br />Bojana Vujanović JOURNEY / PUTOVANJE (1972, 2 min, 16mm, b&amp;w/color)<br />Mirko Avramović &amp; Miodrag Tarana FROM ME TO YOU / OD MENE DO TEBE (1972, 4 min, 8mm, b&amp;w)<br />Nikola Đurić VOWELS / SAMOGLASNICI (1973, 8 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Ljubomir &Scaron;imunić GERDY, THE WICKED WITCH / GERDY, ZLOČESTA VJE&Scaron;TICA (1973-76, 9.5 min, 8mm)<br />Ivan Obrenov EXPIRATION / IZDAH (1976, 12 min, 16mm)<br />Radoslav Vladić HOUSE / KUĆA (1977, 8 min, 16mm)<br />Bojan Jovanović HOLIDAY / PRAZNIK (1983, 11 min, 16mm)<br />Miroslav Bata Petrović PURE FILM: MEMENTO OF GEFF / ČISTI FILM: SEĆANJE NA GEFF (1984, 5 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Sunday, March 08 TELL THEM WILLIE BOY IS HERE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43923 <p>Screenplay by Abraham Polonsky, based on the novel by Harry Lawton. With Robert Blake, Robert Redford, and Katharine Ross.<br /><br />The impact of the blacklist on the career of Abraham Polonsky was one of the great artistic tragedies of the period, just as his comeback in the late-1960s was among the most triumphant in Hollywood. Bursting on the scene with the remarkable one-two punch of BODY AND SOUL (1947) (with Robert Rossen directing Polonsky&rsquo;s masterful screenplay) and FORCE OF EVIL (1948) (which Polonsky both wrote and directed), as well as working on the screenplay for I CAN GET IF FOR YOU WHOLESALE (1951), he refused to testify before HUAC in 1951 and would not be credited on a theatrical feature again until 1968. Given the immensity of his talent, the loss of these prime years is a wound that will never heal. But Polonsky would pick up right where he had left off, with a terrific script for another great filmmaker (Don Siegel&rsquo;s MADIGAN, 1968), followed by one more astonishing work as writer-director: TELL THEM WILLIE BOY IS HERE. A revisionist Western that probes deeply into the phenomenon of racial and social injustice, it stars Robert Blake as Paiute Indian Willie Boy, who becomes an outlaw after killing his lover&rsquo;s father in self-defense, and Robert Redford as the sheriff whose imperative to hunt Willie Boy down flies increasingly in the face of his own conscience.</p> Sunday, March 08 M*A*S*H http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43927 <p>Screenplay by Ring Lardner Jr., based on the novel by Richard Hooker. With Donald Sutherland, Elliott Gould, Tom Skerritt, Sally Kellerman, and Robert Duvall.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ring Lardner, Jr., a member of the Hollywood 10, won an Academy Award for his adaptation of Richard Hooker&rsquo;s novel. Even though Altman&rsquo;s penchant for improvisation angered Lardner, who believed his script was being sullied, Patrick McGilligan argues that the veteran screenwriter&rsquo;s craftsmanship provided a solid framework that made Altman&rsquo;s innovations &ndash; especially his famous use of rapid fire overlapping dialogue &ndash; possible. There&rsquo;s little doubt that Lardner was responsible for the film&rsquo;s sardonic anti-war thrust. The film revolves around the antics of two surgeons assigned to a mobile medical unit during the Korean War: Hawkeye Pierce (Donald Sutherland) and &lsquo;Trapper&rsquo; John McIntyre (Elliott Gould). M*A*S*H was embraced by the counterculture as an antiwar movie, even though the emerging women&rsquo;s movement expressed dismay at the casual sexism of Altman and Lardner&rsquo;s depiction of Major Margaret &lsquo;Hot Lips&rsquo; Houlihan (Sally Kellerman).&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Porton<br /><br />&ldquo;M*A*S*H is a marvelously unstable comedy, a tough, funny, and sophisticated burlesque of military attitudes that is at the same time a tale of chivalry. It&rsquo;s a sick joke, but it&rsquo;s also generous and romantic &ndash; an erratic episodic film, full of the pleasures of the unexpected. I think it&rsquo;s the closest an American movie has come to the kind of constantly surprising mixture in SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER, though M*A*S*H moves so fast that it&rsquo;s over before you have time to think of comparisons. While it&rsquo;s going on, you&rsquo;re busy listening to some of the best overlapping comic dialogue ever recorded.&rdquo; &ndash;Pauline Kael, THE NEW YORKER</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Monday, March 09 TWO MULES FOR SISTER SARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43931 <p>Screenplay by Albert Maltz, story by Budd Boetticher. With Clint Eastwood and Shirley MacLaine.<br /><br />This inexplicably neglected western, set during the 1860s French intervention in Mexico, is every bit as exciting, perfectly crafted, and disarmingly funny as you&rsquo;d expect from the dream-team meeting of Hollywood legends Don Siegel and Budd Boetticher. This despite the fact that Boetticher, who wrote the original screenplay with the intention of directing it himself, only to see it eventually re-written by blacklistee Albert Maltz (resident in Mexico, where he&rsquo;d relocated during the blacklist) and directed by Siegel, despised the final product. Representing Maltz&rsquo;s first screen credit under his own name since 1948, TWO MULES is more broadly comic than it might have been in Boetticher&rsquo;s hands, but features Clint Eastwood and Shirley Maclaine at their very best as soldier-of-fortune Hogan and nun-turned-revolutionary Sara, as well as an Ennio Morricone score that ranks among his most inspired. Though it would be a stretch to call it a sober study of the Mexican revolution, the familiarity of both Maltz and Boetticher with Mexico and their unquestionable interest in its history unmistakably inform the film.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Monday, March 09 CRY OF BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43907 <p>Screenplay by Bernard Gordon, based on the novel by Benjamin Appel. With Van Heflin, Rita Moreno, and James MacArthur.<br /><br />&ldquo;The overlong source novel for CRY OF BATTLE focused on Filipino leadership of the U.S.-backed guerrilla movement against Japanese occupation of the Philippines during WWII. Adapting it offered Gordon a rare &lsquo;chance to write a film script that would have something to say about American attitudes toward the native people in those days,&rsquo; he wrote in his memoir &lsquo;Hollywood Exile, or How I Learned to Love the Blacklist,&rsquo; while highlighting the contribution &lsquo;of the Filipinos in the struggle against the Japanese.&rsquo; Irving Lerner, loosely associated with the Frontier Films documentary collective in the 1930s, shot the film realistically in and around Manila, with American leads and distinguished Filipino actors. Bosley Crowther rave-reviewed the low-budget film in the October 12, 1963, New York Times (&lsquo;acerbic and action-charged&rsquo;), marking Gordon&rsquo;s first on-screen credit after a decade of operating under fronts with as much prolificacy as Dalton Trumbo. CRY OF BATTLE&rsquo;s other claim to fame: it was showing in the Dallas theater where Lee Harvey Oswald was apprehended on November 22, 1963. A snippet can be glimpsed in Oliver Stone&rsquo;s JFK.&rdquo; &ndash;Patrick McGilligan</p> Tuesday, March 10 THE LAST SUNSET http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43903 <p>Screenplay by Dalton Trumbo, based on the novel by Howard Rigsby. With Rock Hudson, Kirk Douglas, Dorothy Malone, Joseph Cotton, Carol Lynley, and Neville Brand.<br /><br />&ldquo;Although Dalton Trumbo considered THE LAST SUNSET his worst script, this fascinatingly overripe western is noteworthy for Robert Aldrich&rsquo;s usual visual panache and a baroque plot that looks forward to the revisionist &lsquo;last westerns&rsquo; of the late 1960s and early 70s. After completing the script for SPARTACUS, Trumbo, working again for Kirk Douglas&rsquo;s Byrna Productions, received a post-blacklist screen credit. The convoluted plot involves the attempts of the upright sheriff Dan Stribling (Rock Hudson) to apprehend outlaw Brendan O&rsquo;Malley (Kirk Douglas), responsible for the murder of Stribling&rsquo;s brother-in-law. O&rsquo;Malley has been lured to Mexico to reignite his romance with Belle Breckinridge under the ruse of working on the ranch of her alcoholic husband John (Joseph Cotten). Ultimately smitten with Belle&rsquo;s daughter Melissa (Carol Lynley), O&rsquo;Malley&rsquo;s misplaced passion results in a particularly audacious plot twist. THE LAST SUNSET, even while straining credulity and reworking themes borrowed from Greek tragedy with mixed results, is a precursor of the sexual frankness that would permeate genre films of the late 60s.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Porton</p> Tuesday, March 10 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-44015 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, March 11 TWO MULES FOR SISTER SARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43932 <p>Screenplay by Albert Maltz, story by Budd Boetticher. With Clint Eastwood and Shirley MacLaine.<br /><br />This inexplicably neglected western, set during the 1860s French intervention in Mexico, is every bit as exciting, perfectly crafted, and disarmingly funny as you&rsquo;d expect from the dream-team meeting of Hollywood legends Don Siegel and Budd Boetticher. This despite the fact that Boetticher, who wrote the original screenplay with the intention of directing it himself, only to see it eventually re-written by blacklistee Albert Maltz (resident in Mexico, where he&rsquo;d relocated during the blacklist) and directed by Siegel, despised the final product. Representing Maltz&rsquo;s first screen credit under his own name since 1948, TWO MULES is more broadly comic than it might have been in Boetticher&rsquo;s hands, but features Clint Eastwood and Shirley Maclaine at their very best as soldier-of-fortune Hogan and nun-turned-revolutionary Sara, as well as an Ennio Morricone score that ranks among his most inspired. Though it would be a stretch to call it a sober study of the Mexican revolution, the familiarity of both Maltz and Boetticher with Mexico and their unquestionable interest in its history unmistakably inform the film.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wednesday, March 11 FAIL-SAFE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43914 <p>Screenplay by Walter Bernstein, based on the novel by Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler. With Henry Fonda, Dan O&rsquo;Herlihy, Walter Matthau, Frank Overton, Fritz Weaver, Larry Hagman, William Hansen, Sorrell Booke, Dom DeLuise, and Dana Elcar.<br /><br />&ldquo;Bernstein got to know Lumet, formerly a child actor with the Yiddish Art Theatre, when Lumet was an assistant director to Martin Ritt on CHARLIE WILD, PRIVATE EYE, a half-hour TV show Bernstein wrote under &lsquo;fronts&rsquo; in 1950-51. Bernstein would do some of his finest work with these simpatico friends, Ritt and Lumet. A writer&rsquo;s writer, Bernstein boasts one of the richest of resum&eacute;s, and seems as comfortable with tense uncompromising subjects, sweeping recreations of history, and, especially in the 1970s, philandering romantic comedies. All his films are social critiques, and his lifelong attention to the military-industrial complex is followed through in DOOMSDAY GUN, his 1994 HBO film with Frank Langella as a supergun genius caught between Israel, Iraq, and the CIA, and something of a bookend to FAIL-SAFE. FAIL-SAFE is one of the tensest of his 1960s credits, a disarmament parable that is splendidly entertaining and disturbing in equal parts. &lsquo;DR. STRANGELOVE without the humor,&rsquo; in Danny Peary&rsquo;s apt phrase.&rdquo; &ndash;Patrick McGilligan</p> Wednesday, March 11 TELL THEM WILLIE BOY IS HERE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43924 <p>Screenplay by Abraham Polonsky, based on the novel by Harry Lawton. With Robert Blake, Robert Redford, and Katharine Ross.<br /><br />The impact of the blacklist on the career of Abraham Polonsky was one of the great artistic tragedies of the period, just as his comeback in the late-1960s was among the most triumphant in Hollywood. Bursting on the scene with the remarkable one-two punch of BODY AND SOUL (1947) (with Robert Rossen directing Polonsky&rsquo;s masterful screenplay) and FORCE OF EVIL (1948) (which Polonsky both wrote and directed), as well as working on the screenplay for I CAN GET IF FOR YOU WHOLESALE (1951), he refused to testify before HUAC in 1951 and would not be credited on a theatrical feature again until 1968. Given the immensity of his talent, the loss of these prime years is a wound that will never heal. But Polonsky would pick up right where he had left off, with a terrific script for another great filmmaker (Don Siegel&rsquo;s MADIGAN, 1968), followed by one more astonishing work as writer-director: TELL THEM WILLIE BOY IS HERE. A revisionist Western that probes deeply into the phenomenon of racial and social injustice, it stars Robert Blake as Paiute Indian Willie Boy, who becomes an outlaw after killing his lover&rsquo;s father in self-defense, and Robert Redford as the sheriff whose imperative to hunt Willie Boy down flies increasingly in the face of his own conscience.</p> Thursday, March 12 UNESSENTIAL CINEMA PRESENTS: THE RECKONING OF PAC LAB http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43988 <p>The echoing conversation about the death of film is endless and depressing, as is the recent demise of our longtime neighbor on E. 1st St., the esteemed and notorious Pac Lab. Like them or hate them, and there was no in-between, Pac Lab was a true NYC staple, as well as the last local resource we had for same-day processing of Super-8mm and 16mm film. Over the years Pac Lab proved itself to be a company that possessed as much character and quirkiness as its clients. They catered to artists, students, and everyday folks looking to transfer their parents&rsquo; home movies to video. Being a Pac Lab client often involved an element of risk, with anxious patrons left to wonder: Will my film come back scratched? Will there be any image? Will it come back at all? All kidding aside, they were a key component and longtime enabler of our regional filmmaking community. Without them, we are forced to face the end of celluloid film much sooner than most of us ever expected.<br /><br />This unique event will offer up a baker&rsquo;s dozen of film reels and tapes culled from the remnants of Pac Lab&rsquo;s significant detritus. Anthology has inherited boxes and bags of films that were submitted for processing, but abandoned by clients who never paid or picked up their footage. Uncatalogued and entirely unseen by us, our educated guess is that these reels contain copious examples of student film shenanigans, home movies, stoned experiments, attempted art projects, and probably a naked girlfriend or two. For this special show we guarantee that no films will be previewed beforehand and that all selections shall be made blindly and without prejudice. Soundtracks and other alterations may be added to enhance entertainment potential. If you think that one of these reels might be yours, then please join us for your world premiere screening!<br /><br />FREE FOR AFA MEMBERS!</p> Thursday, March 12 M*A*S*H http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43928 <p>Screenplay by Ring Lardner Jr., based on the novel by Richard Hooker. With Donald Sutherland, Elliott Gould, Tom Skerritt, Sally Kellerman, and Robert Duvall.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ring Lardner, Jr., a member of the Hollywood 10, won an Academy Award for his adaptation of Richard Hooker&rsquo;s novel. Even though Altman&rsquo;s penchant for improvisation angered Lardner, who believed his script was being sullied, Patrick McGilligan argues that the veteran screenwriter&rsquo;s craftsmanship provided a solid framework that made Altman&rsquo;s innovations &ndash; especially his famous use of rapid fire overlapping dialogue &ndash; possible. There&rsquo;s little doubt that Lardner was responsible for the film&rsquo;s sardonic anti-war thrust. The film revolves around the antics of two surgeons assigned to a mobile medical unit during the Korean War: Hawkeye Pierce (Donald Sutherland) and &lsquo;Trapper&rsquo; John McIntyre (Elliott Gould). M*A*S*H was embraced by the counterculture as an antiwar movie, even though the emerging women&rsquo;s movement expressed dismay at the casual sexism of Altman and Lardner&rsquo;s depiction of Major Margaret &lsquo;Hot Lips&rsquo; Houlihan (Sally Kellerman).&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Porton<br /><br />&ldquo;M*A*S*H is a marvelously unstable comedy, a tough, funny, and sophisticated burlesque of military attitudes that is at the same time a tale of chivalry. It&rsquo;s a sick joke, but it&rsquo;s also generous and romantic &ndash; an erratic episodic film, full of the pleasures of the unexpected. I think it&rsquo;s the closest an American movie has come to the kind of constantly surprising mixture in SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER, though M*A*S*H moves so fast that it&rsquo;s over before you have time to think of comparisons. While it&rsquo;s going on, you&rsquo;re busy listening to some of the best overlapping comic dialogue ever recorded.&rdquo; &ndash;Pauline Kael, THE NEW YORKER</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thursday, March 12 THE CHASE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43910 <p>Screenplay by Lillian Hellman, based on the play by Horton Foote. With Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda, Robert Redford, E.G. Marshall, Angie Dickinson, Janice Rule, Miriam Hopkins, Robert Duvall, and James Fox.<br /><br />&ldquo;Based on Horton Foote&rsquo;s play, Lillian Hellman&rsquo;s screenplay was reworked &ndash; at the behest of producer Sam Spiegel &ndash; by both Michael Wilson and Ivan Moffat. In a 1993 interview with CINEASTE, Arthur Penn complained that he wasn&rsquo;t able to oversee the film&rsquo;s editing and bemoaned the fact that Spiegel cut many of star Marlon Brando&rsquo;s ingenious improvisations. Yet, despite these mishaps, THE CHASE, with its unvarnished depiction of Southern violence, paved the way for pivotal films of the 1960s &ndash; especially Penn&rsquo;s own BONNIE AND CLYDE. Robert Redford, in an early major role, plays Bubber Reeves, a convict on the run after a prison break. Wrongly imprisoned for murder, Bubber&rsquo;s escape exacerbates tensions in the small Texas town where he&rsquo;s viewed with suspicion, and where his wife Anna (Jane Fonda) is conducting an affair with the son of the region&rsquo;s wealthiest man. In an intriguing reversal of the usual stereotype, Brando plays a progressive sheriff at odds with local racist vigilantes.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Porton<br /><br />&ldquo;Violence is a subject that an artist who is intuitively and intellectually alive to the world in which he exists can scarcely avoid today; and if there is a more responsible treatment of it anywhere in the cinema, I have yet to see it.&rdquo; &ndash;Robin Wood on THE CHASE</p> Friday, March 13 EC: THE TEXT OF LIGHT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43999 <p>Brakhage&rsquo;s tour-de-force exploration of refracted light in an ashtray.<br />&ldquo;All that is, is light.&rdquo; &ndash;Johannes Scotus Erigena</p> Friday, March 13 TWO MULES FOR SISTER SARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43933 <p>Screenplay by Albert Maltz, story by Budd Boetticher. With Clint Eastwood and Shirley MacLaine.<br /><br />This inexplicably neglected western, set during the 1860s French intervention in Mexico, is every bit as exciting, perfectly crafted, and disarmingly funny as you&rsquo;d expect from the dream-team meeting of Hollywood legends Don Siegel and Budd Boetticher. This despite the fact that Boetticher, who wrote the original screenplay with the intention of directing it himself, only to see it eventually re-written by blacklistee Albert Maltz (resident in Mexico, where he&rsquo;d relocated during the blacklist) and directed by Siegel, despised the final product. Representing Maltz&rsquo;s first screen credit under his own name since 1948, TWO MULES is more broadly comic than it might have been in Boetticher&rsquo;s hands, but features Clint Eastwood and Shirley Maclaine at their very best as soldier-of-fortune Hogan and nun-turned-revolutionary Sara, as well as an Ennio Morricone score that ranks among his most inspired. Though it would be a stretch to call it a sober study of the Mexican revolution, the familiarity of both Maltz and Boetticher with Mexico and their unquestionable interest in its history unmistakably inform the film.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Friday, March 13 THE LAST SUNSET http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43904 <p>Screenplay by Dalton Trumbo, based on the novel by Howard Rigsby. With Rock Hudson, Kirk Douglas, Dorothy Malone, Joseph Cotton, Carol Lynley, and Neville Brand.<br /><br />&ldquo;Although Dalton Trumbo considered THE LAST SUNSET his worst script, this fascinatingly overripe western is noteworthy for Robert Aldrich&rsquo;s usual visual panache and a baroque plot that looks forward to the revisionist &lsquo;last westerns&rsquo; of the late 1960s and early 70s. After completing the script for SPARTACUS, Trumbo, working again for Kirk Douglas&rsquo;s Byrna Productions, received a post-blacklist screen credit. The convoluted plot involves the attempts of the upright sheriff Dan Stribling (Rock Hudson) to apprehend outlaw Brendan O&rsquo;Malley (Kirk Douglas), responsible for the murder of Stribling&rsquo;s brother-in-law. O&rsquo;Malley has been lured to Mexico to reignite his romance with Belle Breckinridge under the ruse of working on the ranch of her alcoholic husband John (Joseph Cotten). Ultimately smitten with Belle&rsquo;s daughter Melissa (Carol Lynley), O&rsquo;Malley&rsquo;s misplaced passion results in a particularly audacious plot twist. THE LAST SUNSET, even while straining credulity and reworking themes borrowed from Greek tragedy with mixed results, is a precursor of the sexual frankness that would permeate genre films of the late 60s.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Porton</p> Saturday, March 14 EC: THE PITTSBURGH TRILOGY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-44000 <p>Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.<br />EYES <br />1970, 36 min, 16mm, silent.<br />&ldquo;After wishing for years to be given-the-opportunity of filming some of the more &lsquo;mystical&rsquo; occupations of our Times &ndash; some of the more obscure Public Figures which the average imagination turns into &lsquo;bogeymen&rsquo;... viz.: Policemen, Doctors, Soldiers, Politicians, etc.: &ndash; I was at last permitted to ride in a Pittsburgh police car, camera in hand, the final several days of September 1970.&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.<br />&amp;<br />DEUS EX <br />1971, 34 min, 16mm, silent.<br />&ldquo;I have been many times very ill in hospitals; and I drew on all that experience while making DEUS EX in West Penn. Hospital of Pittsburgh; but I was especially inspired by the memory of one incident in an emergency room of San Francisco&rsquo;s Mission District: while waiting for medical help, I had held myself together by reading an April-May 1965 issue of &lsquo;Poetry Magazine&rsquo;: and the following lines from Charles Olson&rsquo;s &lsquo;Cole&rsquo;s Island&rsquo; had especially centered the experience, &lsquo;touchstone&rsquo; of DEUS EX, for me: Charles begins the poem with the statement &lsquo;I met Death &ndash;&rsquo; And then: &lsquo;He didn&rsquo;t bother me, or say anything. Which is / not surprising, a person might not, in the circumstances; / or at most a nod or something. Or they would. But they wouldn&rsquo;t, / or you wouldn&rsquo;t think to either, / it was Death. And / He certainly was, the moment I saw him.&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.<br />&amp;<br />THE ACT OF SEEING WITH ONE&rsquo;S OWN EYES<br />1971, 32 min, 16mm, silent.<br />&ldquo;&hellip;Brakhage, entering, with his camera, one of the forbidden, terrific locations of our culture, the autopsy room. It is a place wherein, inversely, life is cherished, for it exists to affirm that no one of us may die without our knowing exactly why. All of us, in the person of the coroner, must see that, for ourselves, with our own eyes. It is a room full of appalling particular intimacies, the last ditch of individuation. Here our vague nightmare of mortality acquires the names and faces of others.&rdquo; &ndash;Hollis Frampton<br />Total running time: ca. 105 minutes.</p> Saturday, March 14 THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43921 <p>Screenplay by Ben Barzman, Basilio Franchina, and Philip Yordan. With Sophia Loren, Stephen Boyd, Alec Guinness, James Mason, Christopher Plummer, Anthony Quayle, John Ireland, and Omar Sharif.<br /><br />The second of the two Samuel Bronston historical super-productions to be directed by Anthony Mann (after EL CID), both of which were treated with extreme condescension in their day but have been increasingly recognized as major achievements, THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE is arguably the greater of the two. A darker, more intricately structured film than EL CID, FALL somehow succeeds as both a big-budget, visually astonishing spectacle animated by a genuine interest in Roman civilization, and a sophisticated, uncompromising inquiry into the nature of power. Best known for his collaborations with fellow blacklistee Joseph Losey in exile in Europe, Ben Barzman co-wrote both FALL and EL CID. In both cases he worked with Philip Yordan, a mysterious and controversial figure in the annals of the blacklist &ndash; the most famous/notorious &lsquo;front&rsquo; of the era, his name appeared on numerous films for which scholars continue to debate the true authorship.</p> Saturday, March 14 WHITE CUBE / BLACK BOX http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43990 <p>This installment of WHITE CUBE / BLACK BOX presents several artist films that playfully utilize the possibilities of the feedback loop provided by (then-)newly-available video formats to create prescient examinations of the dilemma of the self as mediated through technology.<br /><br />Andy Warhol&rsquo;s OUTER AND INNER SPACE is a mesmerizing double-projection starring his Superstar Edie Sedgwick. Each of the projections presents Edie twice: &lsquo;live&rsquo; Edie side-by-side with a pre-recorded video image of herself in profile, appearing to speak into her own ear. This was the first of Warhol&rsquo;s experiments with a split screen, and it is a dizzying rupturing of filmic time and an inspired exercise in the reflexivity of new media.<br /><br />The video featured in the film was shot in the summer of 1965 with high-end video equipment produced by the Norelco Company, provided to Warhol in exchange for an endorsement. Warhol relished the immediacy of the medium, the fact that the end-result could be viewed immediately on a monitor instead of waiting for processing and projection. Ironically, the 11-plus hours of videotape that Warhol shot on this obscure video format is presently lost due to the tapes&rsquo; obsolete technology, so in a sense Warhol preserved these two tapes of Edie by putting them on film.<br /><br />Originally broadcast on public television in Amarillo, TX, Richard Serra&rsquo;s BOOMERANG features Nancy Holt framed in a medium shot with a pair of headphones on her ears. We observe her as she speaks and then hears her words relayed back to her through a delayed transmission. Remarkably eloquent for one caught in such a feedback loop, Holt provides a monologue on experiencing time, thought, and oneself through technology. She remarks, &ldquo;I have a double take on myself. I am once removed from myself &hellip; we are hearing and seeing a world of double reflections and double refractions.&rdquo;<br /><br />As austere and formalist as Warhol&rsquo;s cinema, Joan Jonas&rsquo;s LEFT SIDE RIGHT SIDE is at once a performative exercise and a conceptual video. Jonas considered the video monitor an &ldquo;ongoing mirror&rdquo; and this work manifests that metaphor as she performs in front of the camera, doubling herself with a monitor and a mirror.<br /><br />As a special bonus, we are adding a short clip documenting RCA&rsquo;s &ldquo;See Yourself on Color Television&rdquo; pavilion at the 1964 World&rsquo;s Fair. This was the first time that color television was presented to the public, and it was shared as a participatory rotunda where individuals, passing in front of a camera, would immediately see their color image on a television set. In eye-popping color, this footage is a fascinating look at a public spectacle of real-time feedback loops.<br /><br />Special thanks to Anthology&rsquo;s Digital Archivist Erik Piil, and to Bill Seery for sharing the RCA pavilion footage.<br /><br />ABOUT WHITE CUBE / BLACK BOX:<br />Bridging the gap between the white walls of the gallery and the immersive darkness of a movie theater, Anthology&rsquo;s ongoing series WHITE CUBE / BLACK BOX seeks to create a dialogue between films made by visual artists and works by experimental filmmakers. Curated by Ava Tews.<br /><br />Joan Jonas LEFT SIDE RIGHT SIDE (1972, 9 min, video, b&amp;w)<br />Richard Serra BOOMERANG (1974, 11 min, video. With Nancy Holt.)<br />Footage of the RCA &ldquo;See Yourself on Color Television&rdquo; pavilion at the 1964 World&rsquo;s Fair (1964, ca. 4-min excerpt, video)<br />Andy Warhol OUTER AND INNER SPACE (1965, 33 min, 16mm dual projection, b&amp;w)<br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.</p> Saturday, March 14 TELL THEM WILLIE BOY IS HERE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2015#showing-43925 <p>Screenplay by Abraham Polonsky, based on the novel by Harry Lawton. With Robert Blake, Robert Redford, and Katharine Ross.<br /><br />The impact of the blacklist on the career of Abraham Polonsky was one of the great artistic tragedies of the period, just as his comeback in the late-1960s was among the most triumphant in Hollywood. Bursting on the scene with the remarkable one-two punch of BODY AND SOUL (1947) (with Robert Rossen directing Polonsky&rsquo;s masterful screenplay) and FORCE OF EVIL (1948) (which Polonsky both wrote and directed), as well as working on the screenplay for I CAN GET IF FOR YOU WHOLESALE (1951), he refused to testify before HUAC in 1951 and would not be credited on a theatrical feature again until 1968. Given the immensity of his talent, the loss of these prime years is a wound that will never heal. But Polonsky would pick up right where he had left off, with a terrific script for another great filmmaker (Don Siegel&rsquo;s MADIGAN, 1968), followed by one more astonishing work as writer-director: TELL THEM WILLIE BOY IS HERE. A revisionist Western that probes deeply into the phenomenon of racial and social injustice, it stars Robert Blake as Paiute Indian Willie Boy, who becomes an outlaw after killing his lover&rsquo;s father in self-defense, and Robert Redford as the sheriff whose imperative to hunt Willie Boy down flies increasingly in the face of his own conscience.</p> Saturday, March 14