Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Sun, 18 Nov 2018 05:47:32 -0500 THE WILD BOYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49961 <p>(LES GAR&Ccedil;ONS SAUVAGES)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by Altered Innocence.<br /><br />Admired among cognoscenti for the series of outrageous, highly stylized short films he has created since 1999 (many of them in collaboration with the invaluable actress Elina L&ouml;wensohn), Bertrand Mandico has delivered a first feature film every bit the bizarre, inspired equal of his earlier work. A visually rhapsodic, endlessly inventive feat of storytelling, THE WILD BOYS channels Jules Verne and William S. Burroughs, silent cinema, seafaring adventure tales, tropical island fantasias, and much more, to create a hallucinatory and gleefully gender-bending vision. The film&rsquo;s protagonists are four teenage boys who are packed off to sea under the supervision of a taciturn and forbidding captain in order to learn discipline and order. That these four boys are played by young women is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the orgy of physical, psychological, and sexual transformations that Mandico conjures up. Though the film&rsquo;s deadpan artifice suggests Ra&uacute;l Ruiz or Guy Maddin, it has a sticky, bodily-fluid-drenched tactility and above all a constantly morphing quality that is unique to Mandico. THE WILD BOYS is one of the most fantasmagoric and unpredictable films to appear in recent years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fantasy, eroticism, violence, and mystery engulf a group of young, privileged teenage boys, cast away from the island of La R&eacute;union for committing a sadistic crime. The boys, all played by women, are ferried to sea by a Dutch Captain, charged with reforming their savage ways. They soon stage a rebellion and are released from the captain&rsquo;s grip after a shipwreck into the wilds of a supernatural island. There, among the mutant vegetation and phallic fruits, the wild boys act upon their abject sexual desires and undergo a mystical transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;Little else in 2017 was quite as exhilarating, eye-popping, intoxicating, seductive, carefree, funky, sexy, and fun.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Sunday, November 18 THE WILD BOYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49962 <p>(LES GAR&Ccedil;ONS SAUVAGES)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by Altered Innocence.<br /><br />Admired among cognoscenti for the series of outrageous, highly stylized short films he has created since 1999 (many of them in collaboration with the invaluable actress Elina L&ouml;wensohn), Bertrand Mandico has delivered a first feature film every bit the bizarre, inspired equal of his earlier work. A visually rhapsodic, endlessly inventive feat of storytelling, THE WILD BOYS channels Jules Verne and William S. Burroughs, silent cinema, seafaring adventure tales, tropical island fantasias, and much more, to create a hallucinatory and gleefully gender-bending vision. The film&rsquo;s protagonists are four teenage boys who are packed off to sea under the supervision of a taciturn and forbidding captain in order to learn discipline and order. That these four boys are played by young women is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the orgy of physical, psychological, and sexual transformations that Mandico conjures up. Though the film&rsquo;s deadpan artifice suggests Ra&uacute;l Ruiz or Guy Maddin, it has a sticky, bodily-fluid-drenched tactility and above all a constantly morphing quality that is unique to Mandico. THE WILD BOYS is one of the most fantasmagoric and unpredictable films to appear in recent years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fantasy, eroticism, violence, and mystery engulf a group of young, privileged teenage boys, cast away from the island of La R&eacute;union for committing a sadistic crime. The boys, all played by women, are ferried to sea by a Dutch Captain, charged with reforming their savage ways. They soon stage a rebellion and are released from the captain&rsquo;s grip after a shipwreck into the wilds of a supernatural island. There, among the mutant vegetation and phallic fruits, the wild boys act upon their abject sexual desires and undergo a mystical transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;Little else in 2017 was quite as exhilarating, eye-popping, intoxicating, seductive, carefree, funky, sexy, and fun.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Sunday, November 18 THE WILD BOYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49963 <p>(LES GAR&Ccedil;ONS SAUVAGES)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by Altered Innocence.<br /><br />Admired among cognoscenti for the series of outrageous, highly stylized short films he has created since 1999 (many of them in collaboration with the invaluable actress Elina L&ouml;wensohn), Bertrand Mandico has delivered a first feature film every bit the bizarre, inspired equal of his earlier work. A visually rhapsodic, endlessly inventive feat of storytelling, THE WILD BOYS channels Jules Verne and William S. Burroughs, silent cinema, seafaring adventure tales, tropical island fantasias, and much more, to create a hallucinatory and gleefully gender-bending vision. The film&rsquo;s protagonists are four teenage boys who are packed off to sea under the supervision of a taciturn and forbidding captain in order to learn discipline and order. That these four boys are played by young women is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the orgy of physical, psychological, and sexual transformations that Mandico conjures up. Though the film&rsquo;s deadpan artifice suggests Ra&uacute;l Ruiz or Guy Maddin, it has a sticky, bodily-fluid-drenched tactility and above all a constantly morphing quality that is unique to Mandico. THE WILD BOYS is one of the most fantasmagoric and unpredictable films to appear in recent years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fantasy, eroticism, violence, and mystery engulf a group of young, privileged teenage boys, cast away from the island of La R&eacute;union for committing a sadistic crime. The boys, all played by women, are ferried to sea by a Dutch Captain, charged with reforming their savage ways. They soon stage a rebellion and are released from the captain&rsquo;s grip after a shipwreck into the wilds of a supernatural island. There, among the mutant vegetation and phallic fruits, the wild boys act upon their abject sexual desires and undergo a mystical transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;Little else in 2017 was quite as exhilarating, eye-popping, intoxicating, seductive, carefree, funky, sexy, and fun.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Sunday, November 18 THE WILD BOYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49964 <p>(LES GAR&Ccedil;ONS SAUVAGES)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by Altered Innocence.<br /><br />Admired among cognoscenti for the series of outrageous, highly stylized short films he has created since 1999 (many of them in collaboration with the invaluable actress Elina L&ouml;wensohn), Bertrand Mandico has delivered a first feature film every bit the bizarre, inspired equal of his earlier work. A visually rhapsodic, endlessly inventive feat of storytelling, THE WILD BOYS channels Jules Verne and William S. Burroughs, silent cinema, seafaring adventure tales, tropical island fantasias, and much more, to create a hallucinatory and gleefully gender-bending vision. The film&rsquo;s protagonists are four teenage boys who are packed off to sea under the supervision of a taciturn and forbidding captain in order to learn discipline and order. That these four boys are played by young women is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the orgy of physical, psychological, and sexual transformations that Mandico conjures up. Though the film&rsquo;s deadpan artifice suggests Ra&uacute;l Ruiz or Guy Maddin, it has a sticky, bodily-fluid-drenched tactility and above all a constantly morphing quality that is unique to Mandico. THE WILD BOYS is one of the most fantasmagoric and unpredictable films to appear in recent years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fantasy, eroticism, violence, and mystery engulf a group of young, privileged teenage boys, cast away from the island of La R&eacute;union for committing a sadistic crime. The boys, all played by women, are ferried to sea by a Dutch Captain, charged with reforming their savage ways. They soon stage a rebellion and are released from the captain&rsquo;s grip after a shipwreck into the wilds of a supernatural island. There, among the mutant vegetation and phallic fruits, the wild boys act upon their abject sexual desires and undergo a mystical transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;Little else in 2017 was quite as exhilarating, eye-popping, intoxicating, seductive, carefree, funky, sexy, and fun.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Monday, November 19 MERCE CUNNINGHAM CENTENNIAL: VARIATIONS V http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50010 <p>GUS SOLOMONS, JR. IN PERSON!<br /><br />2019 will mark the centennial of Merce Cunningham&rsquo;s birth, providing an occasion to reflect on the choreographer&rsquo;s profound influence. Beginning in the fall of 2018, the Merce Cunningham Trust will launch an ambitious global celebration, featuring performances of original dances, new productions, educational initiatives, and discussions.<br /><br />As part of this centennial celebration, Anthology will host an ongoing series focused on Cunningham&rsquo;s films and videos, calling attention to the presence of the moving image throughout his career. This series will be inaugurated with a rare cinema screening of VARIATIONS V (1966), one of Cunningham&rsquo;s earliest filmed dances.<br /><br />Initially performed in 1965, VARIATIONS V realized a remarkable multi-media collage of stark movement, sound, electronic engineering, and striking film and television images. A key feature of the dance was the presence of twelve antennae poles, built by Robert Moog, that released sounds whenever a dancer was in proximity. Bell Labs research scientist Billy Kluver contributed a set of photocells also designed to trigger sounds &ndash; the sources of which were supervised by John Cage, David Tudor, and Gordon Mumma. The eerie oscillations and tones emanating from Space Age-era gadgetry, along with Stan VanDerBeek and Nam June Paik&rsquo;s film and video manipulations, provide a striking counterpoint to the actions of Cunningham and his dancers. This filmed version from 1966 was staged in the NDR television studio in Hamburg, Germany.<br /><br />Dancer, critic, and choreographer Gus Solomons, Jr., who performed in VARIATIONS V and appears in the film, will be here in person for an introduction and Q&amp;A.<br /><br />Upcoming screenings in the series will further spotlight Cunningham&rsquo;s collaborations in media, especially during the period in which Cunningham worked closely with the artist Charles Atlas, with whom he developed the concept of the video-dance.<br /><br />Presented in collaboration with the Merce Cunningham Trust and Electronic Arts Intermix; special thanks to Ken Tabachnick (Merce Cunningham Trust); Rebecca Cleman (EAI); and Tanisha Jones (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts).<br /><br />John Cage, Merce Cunningham &amp; Stan VanDerBeek<br />VARIATIONS V<br />(1966, 49 min, 16mm. Print courtesy of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.)</p> Monday, November 19 THE WILD BOYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49965 <p>(LES GAR&Ccedil;ONS SAUVAGES)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by Altered Innocence.<br /><br />Admired among cognoscenti for the series of outrageous, highly stylized short films he has created since 1999 (many of them in collaboration with the invaluable actress Elina L&ouml;wensohn), Bertrand Mandico has delivered a first feature film every bit the bizarre, inspired equal of his earlier work. A visually rhapsodic, endlessly inventive feat of storytelling, THE WILD BOYS channels Jules Verne and William S. Burroughs, silent cinema, seafaring adventure tales, tropical island fantasias, and much more, to create a hallucinatory and gleefully gender-bending vision. The film&rsquo;s protagonists are four teenage boys who are packed off to sea under the supervision of a taciturn and forbidding captain in order to learn discipline and order. That these four boys are played by young women is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the orgy of physical, psychological, and sexual transformations that Mandico conjures up. Though the film&rsquo;s deadpan artifice suggests Ra&uacute;l Ruiz or Guy Maddin, it has a sticky, bodily-fluid-drenched tactility and above all a constantly morphing quality that is unique to Mandico. THE WILD BOYS is one of the most fantasmagoric and unpredictable films to appear in recent years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fantasy, eroticism, violence, and mystery engulf a group of young, privileged teenage boys, cast away from the island of La R&eacute;union for committing a sadistic crime. The boys, all played by women, are ferried to sea by a Dutch Captain, charged with reforming their savage ways. They soon stage a rebellion and are released from the captain&rsquo;s grip after a shipwreck into the wilds of a supernatural island. There, among the mutant vegetation and phallic fruits, the wild boys act upon their abject sexual desires and undergo a mystical transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;Little else in 2017 was quite as exhilarating, eye-popping, intoxicating, seductive, carefree, funky, sexy, and fun.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Monday, November 19 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49947 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Tuesday, November 20 THE WILD BOYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49966 <p>(LES GAR&Ccedil;ONS SAUVAGES)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by Altered Innocence.<br /><br />Admired among cognoscenti for the series of outrageous, highly stylized short films he has created since 1999 (many of them in collaboration with the invaluable actress Elina L&ouml;wensohn), Bertrand Mandico has delivered a first feature film every bit the bizarre, inspired equal of his earlier work. A visually rhapsodic, endlessly inventive feat of storytelling, THE WILD BOYS channels Jules Verne and William S. Burroughs, silent cinema, seafaring adventure tales, tropical island fantasias, and much more, to create a hallucinatory and gleefully gender-bending vision. The film&rsquo;s protagonists are four teenage boys who are packed off to sea under the supervision of a taciturn and forbidding captain in order to learn discipline and order. That these four boys are played by young women is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the orgy of physical, psychological, and sexual transformations that Mandico conjures up. Though the film&rsquo;s deadpan artifice suggests Ra&uacute;l Ruiz or Guy Maddin, it has a sticky, bodily-fluid-drenched tactility and above all a constantly morphing quality that is unique to Mandico. THE WILD BOYS is one of the most fantasmagoric and unpredictable films to appear in recent years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fantasy, eroticism, violence, and mystery engulf a group of young, privileged teenage boys, cast away from the island of La R&eacute;union for committing a sadistic crime. The boys, all played by women, are ferried to sea by a Dutch Captain, charged with reforming their savage ways. They soon stage a rebellion and are released from the captain&rsquo;s grip after a shipwreck into the wilds of a supernatural island. There, among the mutant vegetation and phallic fruits, the wild boys act upon their abject sexual desires and undergo a mystical transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;Little else in 2017 was quite as exhilarating, eye-popping, intoxicating, seductive, carefree, funky, sexy, and fun.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Tuesday, November 20 THE WILD BOYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49967 <p>(LES GAR&Ccedil;ONS SAUVAGES)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by Altered Innocence.<br /><br />Admired among cognoscenti for the series of outrageous, highly stylized short films he has created since 1999 (many of them in collaboration with the invaluable actress Elina L&ouml;wensohn), Bertrand Mandico has delivered a first feature film every bit the bizarre, inspired equal of his earlier work. A visually rhapsodic, endlessly inventive feat of storytelling, THE WILD BOYS channels Jules Verne and William S. Burroughs, silent cinema, seafaring adventure tales, tropical island fantasias, and much more, to create a hallucinatory and gleefully gender-bending vision. The film&rsquo;s protagonists are four teenage boys who are packed off to sea under the supervision of a taciturn and forbidding captain in order to learn discipline and order. That these four boys are played by young women is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the orgy of physical, psychological, and sexual transformations that Mandico conjures up. Though the film&rsquo;s deadpan artifice suggests Ra&uacute;l Ruiz or Guy Maddin, it has a sticky, bodily-fluid-drenched tactility and above all a constantly morphing quality that is unique to Mandico. THE WILD BOYS is one of the most fantasmagoric and unpredictable films to appear in recent years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fantasy, eroticism, violence, and mystery engulf a group of young, privileged teenage boys, cast away from the island of La R&eacute;union for committing a sadistic crime. The boys, all played by women, are ferried to sea by a Dutch Captain, charged with reforming their savage ways. They soon stage a rebellion and are released from the captain&rsquo;s grip after a shipwreck into the wilds of a supernatural island. There, among the mutant vegetation and phallic fruits, the wild boys act upon their abject sexual desires and undergo a mystical transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;Little else in 2017 was quite as exhilarating, eye-popping, intoxicating, seductive, carefree, funky, sexy, and fun.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Tuesday, November 20 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49948 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, November 21 THE WILD BOYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49968 <p>(LES GAR&Ccedil;ONS SAUVAGES)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by Altered Innocence.<br /><br />Admired among cognoscenti for the series of outrageous, highly stylized short films he has created since 1999 (many of them in collaboration with the invaluable actress Elina L&ouml;wensohn), Bertrand Mandico has delivered a first feature film every bit the bizarre, inspired equal of his earlier work. A visually rhapsodic, endlessly inventive feat of storytelling, THE WILD BOYS channels Jules Verne and William S. Burroughs, silent cinema, seafaring adventure tales, tropical island fantasias, and much more, to create a hallucinatory and gleefully gender-bending vision. The film&rsquo;s protagonists are four teenage boys who are packed off to sea under the supervision of a taciturn and forbidding captain in order to learn discipline and order. That these four boys are played by young women is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the orgy of physical, psychological, and sexual transformations that Mandico conjures up. Though the film&rsquo;s deadpan artifice suggests Ra&uacute;l Ruiz or Guy Maddin, it has a sticky, bodily-fluid-drenched tactility and above all a constantly morphing quality that is unique to Mandico. THE WILD BOYS is one of the most fantasmagoric and unpredictable films to appear in recent years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fantasy, eroticism, violence, and mystery engulf a group of young, privileged teenage boys, cast away from the island of La R&eacute;union for committing a sadistic crime. The boys, all played by women, are ferried to sea by a Dutch Captain, charged with reforming their savage ways. They soon stage a rebellion and are released from the captain&rsquo;s grip after a shipwreck into the wilds of a supernatural island. There, among the mutant vegetation and phallic fruits, the wild boys act upon their abject sexual desires and undergo a mystical transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;Little else in 2017 was quite as exhilarating, eye-popping, intoxicating, seductive, carefree, funky, sexy, and fun.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Wednesday, November 21 THE WILD BOYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49969 <p>(LES GAR&Ccedil;ONS SAUVAGES)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Distributed by Altered Innocence.<br /><br />Admired among cognoscenti for the series of outrageous, highly stylized short films he has created since 1999 (many of them in collaboration with the invaluable actress Elina L&ouml;wensohn), Bertrand Mandico has delivered a first feature film every bit the bizarre, inspired equal of his earlier work. A visually rhapsodic, endlessly inventive feat of storytelling, THE WILD BOYS channels Jules Verne and William S. Burroughs, silent cinema, seafaring adventure tales, tropical island fantasias, and much more, to create a hallucinatory and gleefully gender-bending vision. The film&rsquo;s protagonists are four teenage boys who are packed off to sea under the supervision of a taciturn and forbidding captain in order to learn discipline and order. That these four boys are played by young women is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the orgy of physical, psychological, and sexual transformations that Mandico conjures up. Though the film&rsquo;s deadpan artifice suggests Ra&uacute;l Ruiz or Guy Maddin, it has a sticky, bodily-fluid-drenched tactility and above all a constantly morphing quality that is unique to Mandico. THE WILD BOYS is one of the most fantasmagoric and unpredictable films to appear in recent years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fantasy, eroticism, violence, and mystery engulf a group of young, privileged teenage boys, cast away from the island of La R&eacute;union for committing a sadistic crime. The boys, all played by women, are ferried to sea by a Dutch Captain, charged with reforming their savage ways. They soon stage a rebellion and are released from the captain&rsquo;s grip after a shipwreck into the wilds of a supernatural island. There, among the mutant vegetation and phallic fruits, the wild boys act upon their abject sexual desires and undergo a mystical transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;Little else in 2017 was quite as exhilarating, eye-popping, intoxicating, seductive, carefree, funky, sexy, and fun.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Wednesday, November 21 IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50056 <p>&ldquo;[IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT is a film] about being hungry, or hungering, where hungering is a metaphor for imagining, in particular imagining a better, or satisfying, way to live. [&hellip;] What this pair does together is less important than the fact that they do whatever it is together, that they know how to spend time together, even that they would rather waste time together than do anything else &ndash; except that no time they are together could be wasted.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell<br /><br />&ldquo;I wish to ponder [the film&rsquo;s] central figure of the barrier-screen, I daresay the most famous blanket in the history of drama. I am not unaware that some of my readers&hellip;will not fully credit the possibility that a comic barrier, hardly more than a prop in a traveling salesman joke, can invoke issues of metaphysical isolation and of the possibility of community &ndash;&nbsp;<em>must</em>invoke them if this film&rsquo;s comedy is to be understood. [&hellip;] The blanket dividing the space, and falling between the beds, is the man&rsquo;s idea as the principal pair, for the first of three times we will know about, prepare to share a cabin in an auto camp. The woman is understandably skeptical: &lsquo;That, I suppose, makes everything all right.&rsquo; He replies that he likes privacy when he retires, that prying eyes annoy him, and goes on at once to situate the blanket allegorically: &lsquo;Behold the Walls of Jericho. Maybe not as thick as the ones Joshua blew down with his trumpet, but a lot safer. You see, I have no trumpet.&rsquo; Wise in the ways of Hollywood symbolism, as generally obvious as the raising and lowering of a flag, we could already predict that the action of the film will close with the walls tumbling down. But then let us be wise enough, if we care about this film, to care about the rigors of this symbolism. The question the narrative must ask itself is how to get them to tumble. That this is a question, and the kind of question it is, is declared late in the film when the second blanket is shown unceremoniously pulled down by the suspicious owners of this second auto camp. Of course it is easy to pull down if you do not know what it is, or care. So an early requirement for its correct tumbling is that the pair come to share a fantasy of what is holding it up.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Friday, November 23 EC: RAPT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50103 <p>&ldquo;RAPT is, paradoxically, both a film which looks back anachronistically toward the silent era and a work which belongs to the vanguard of sound cinema. Part of that paradox can be resolved by an understanding of the film&rsquo;s complex utilization of music. RAPT employs very little dialogue, and in this respect it is reminiscent of the part-talkie genre&hellip;. It is linked to such abstract and hybrid avant-garde works as VAMPYR and L&rsquo;&Acirc;GE D&rsquo;OR. The radical nature of RAPT, however, resides in its vision of a cinematic musical score. In making the film, Kirsanoff worked closely with the composers Honegger and Hoerce.&rdquo; &ndash;Lucy Fisher</p> Friday, November 23 THE AWFUL TRUTH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50059 <p>Preserved print courtesy of the UCLA Film &amp; Television Archive.<br /><br />&ldquo;You learn to look, in a McCarey scene, for the disturbing current under an agreeable surface. He has the power to walk a scene right to that verge at which the comic is no longer comic, without either losing the humor or letting the humor deny the humanity of its victims. (Not for nothing is he the director of the Marx brothers as well as of LOVE AFFAIR, 1939, also with Irene Dunne.)&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell<br /><br />&ldquo;Nietzsche&rsquo;s vision of becoming a child and overcoming revenge is tied up with the achievement of a new vision of time, or a new stance toward it, an acceptance of Eternal Recurrence. And here we are, at the concluding image of THE AWFUL TRUTH, watching two childlike figures returning, and meant to return as long as they exist, into a clock-house, a home of time, to inhabit time anew. How can my linking of Friedrich Nietzsche and Leo McCarey not be chance? How&nbsp;<em>can</em>it be chance? All you need to accept in order to accept the connection are two propositions: that Nietzsche and McCarey are each originals, or anyway that each works on native ground, within which each knows and can mean what he does; and that there are certain truths to these matters which discover where the concepts come together of time and of childhood and of forgiveness and of overcoming revenge and of an acceptance of the repetitive needs of the body and the soul &ndash; of one&rsquo;s motions and one&rsquo;s motives, one&rsquo;s ecstasies and routines, one&rsquo;s sexuality and one&rsquo;s loves &ndash; as the truths of oneself. They will, whatever we discover, be awful truths, since otherwise why do truths about ourselves take such pains to find and to say?&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Friday, November 23 BRINGING UP BABY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50062 <p>&ldquo;BRINGING UP BABY presents the purest example of a relationship in which the pair do next to nothing practical throughout our knowledge of them; what they do is something like play games; you could almost say they merely have fun together, except that it takes the entire course of the film for the man to come to the essential insight about himself that he was throughout having fun. I would like to say that they achieve purposefulness without purpose. It is because of this purity of action, I believe, that people sometimes find BRINGING UP BABY the hardest of these films to take.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Saturday, November 24 THE PHILADELPHIA STORY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50065 <p>&ldquo;Perhaps the most obvious difference of THE PHILADELPHIA STORY from its companion members in the genre of remarriage is that it has two heroes, two leading men who are honorable and likable enough for their happiness at the end to make us happy. A good reason for this double presence is to allow us, or to force us, to figure that while each of these men seems a fit candidate for the hand of the heroine [Katharine Hepburn], while each loves and appreciates her, and she each of them, one of them is chosen by the genre, as it were, as the more perfectly fit. But on what ground? What has Cary Grant got that James Stewart hasn&rsquo;t got? What is the relevant difference between them?&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Saturday, November 24 EC: KUBELKA / LYE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50104 <p>Peter Kubelka<br />MOSAIC IN CONFIDENCE / MOSAIK IM VERTRAUEN&nbsp;(1955, 16 min, 35mm, <span>Made in collaboration with Ferry Radax.</span>)<br />ADEBAR (1957, 1 min, 35mm)<br />SCHWECHATER (1958, 1 min, 35mm)<br />ARNULF RAINER (1960, 7 min, 35mm)<br />OUR TRIP TO AFRICA /&nbsp;UNSERE AFRIKAREISE (1966, 12 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;Peter Kubelka is the perfectionist of the film medium; and, as I honor that quality above all others at this time finding such a lack of it now elsewhere, I would simply like to say: Peter Kubelka is the world&rsquo;s greatest filmmaker &ndash; which is to say, simply: see his films!&hellip;by all means/above all else&hellip;etcetera.&rdquo; &ndash;Stan Brakhage<br /><br />Len Lye<br />TUSALAVA (1929, 10 min, 16mm, silent)<br />TRADE TATTOO (1937, 5 min, 16mm)<br />RHYTHM (1957, 1 min, 16mm)<br />FREE RADICALS (1958/79, 4 min, 16mm)<br />A giant of experimental animation, Len Lye was born in New Zealand in 1901. He moved to England in the 1920s and subsequently to New York in 1944, where he spent the last 40 years of his life. A pioneer of &lsquo;scratch&rsquo; or &lsquo;direct&rsquo; filmmaking, Lye used various tools to mark patterns, shapes, and images directly onto the film&rsquo;s surface, and often explored the dynamic energy of abstract images propelled into life by lively jazz scores or Pacific-inspired rhythms.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 60 min.</p> Saturday, November 24 HIS GIRL FRIDAY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50069 <p>Preserved print courtesy of the UCLA Film &amp; Television Archive.<br /><br />&ldquo;The restaurant sequence with Walter, Hildy, and Bruce is brilliant and satisfying beyond praise. It takes place in the only comforting environment in a film of claustrophobic sets. But the beauty of the sequence lies in the way it plays for these characters, especially for the central pair. [&hellip;] The kicks on the shin Hildy gives Walter under the table are familiar gestures of propriety and intimacy; and the pair communicate not only by way of feet and hand signals but in a lingo and tempo, and about events present and past, that Bruce can have no part in. They simply&nbsp;<em>appreciate</em>one another more than either of them appreciates anyone else, and they would rather be appreciated by one another more than by anyone else. They just are at home with one another, whether or not they can live together under the same roof, that is, find a roof they can live together under.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell<br /><br /><strong><em>The screening on Sat, Nov 24 will be introduced by Cathleen Cavell, Stanley Cavell&rsquo;s wife!</em></strong></p> Saturday, November 24 EC: GEORGE & MIKE KUCHAR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50105 <p>All films in this program have been preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation.<br /><br />PUSSY ON A HOT TIN ROOF (1961, 14 min, 8mm-to-16mm)<br />&ldquo;It glows with the embers of desire! It smokes with the revelation of men and women longing for robust temptations that will make them sizzle into maturity with a furnace-blast of unrestrained animalism. A film for young and old to enjoy.&rdquo; &ndash;George Kuchar<br /><br />MOUNTAIN VACATIONS (1962, 15 min, 8mm-to-16mm blow-up, silent)<br />Also known as CATSKILL COOL CATS, this mysterious reel has never appeared in any Kuchar filmography, including the list in their joint memoir, REFLECTIONS ON A CINEMATIC CESSPOOL. George recalls that this vacation destination was the easiest place to reach by bus from the Bronx.<br /><br />TOOTSIES IN AUTUMN (1963, 15 min, 8mm-to-16mm)<br />A cautionary tale about past-their-prime thespians caught up in a typically Kucharian vortex of madness.<br /><br />LOVERS OF ETERNITY (1964, 36 min, 8mm-to-16mm blow-up, sound on CD. Featuring Mary Flanagan, Dov Lederberg and Jack Smith.)<br />The last 8mm Kuchar production is an all-too-tragic tale in which we find underground icon Jack Smith, experimental filmmaker Dov Lederberg, and one giant cockroach intermingling in the squalor of the Lower East Side.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.<br /><br />[<strong><em>MOUNTAIN VACATIONS and LOVERS OF ETERNITY&nbsp;</em></strong><strong><em>are not part of the Essential Cinema collection, but are included here as a special bonus.</em></strong>]</p> Saturday, November 24 THE LADY EVE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50072 <p>&ldquo;Let us approach [the protagonists] by getting deeper into this film&rsquo;s identifying of itself with the tradition of romance. Take first the feature of the action&rsquo;s moving from a starting place of impasse to a place Frye calls &lsquo;the green world,&rsquo; a place in which perspective and renewal are to be achieved. In A MIDSUMMER NIGHT&rsquo;S DREAM this place is a forest inhabited by fairies, explicitly a place of dreams and magic; in THE WINTER&rsquo;S TALE the place is the rural society of Bohemia; &hellip;in THE TEMPEST it occupies the entire setting of the action, with the framing larger world supplied by narrative speeches; in BRINGING UP BABY, THE AWFUL TRUTH, and ADAM&rsquo;S RIB, in addition to THE LADY EVE&hellip;this locale is called Connecticut. Strictly speaking, in THE LADY EVE the place is called &lsquo;Conneckticut,&rsquo; and it is all but explicitly cited as a mythical location, since nobody is quite sure how you get there, or anyway how a lady gets there. This is Preston Sturges showing off at once his powers of parody and his knowledge of his subject, and giving us fair warning: in his green world the mind or plot will not only be cleared and restored, it will be darkened and frozen.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Saturday, November 24 EC: GEORGE LANDOW, AKA OWEN LAND http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50106 <p>&ldquo;The unique contribution of Land&rsquo;s work lies in the fusion of intellectual reason and, significantly, the humor that distances it from the supposedly &lsquo;boring&rsquo; world of avant-garde film. Having explored the basic properties of the celluloid strip itself in early works such as FILM IN WHICH THERE APPEAR&hellip;, his attention turned to the spectator in a series of &lsquo;literal&rsquo; films that question the illusionary nature of cinema through the use of word play and visual ambiguity. His work often parodies experimental film itself by mimicking his contemporaries and mocking the solemn approach of film theorists and scholars.&rdquo; &ndash;Mark Webber, TWO FILMS BY OWEN LAND<br /><br />FLEMING FALOON (1963, 6 min, 16mm)<br />FILM IN WHICH THERE APPEAR SPROCKET HOLES, EDGE LETTERING, DIRT PARTICLES, ETC. (1965/66, 5 min, 16mm, silent)<br />DIPLOTERATOLOGY (1967/78, 7 min, 16mm, silent)<br />THE FILM THAT RISES TO THE SURFACE OF CLARIFIED BUTTER (1968, 9 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />INSTITUTIONAL QUALITY (1969, 5 min, 16mm)<br />REMEDIAL READING COMPREHENSION (1970, 5 min, 16mm)<br />WHAT&rsquo;S WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE? (1972, 13 min, 16mm)<br />THANK YOU JESUS FOR THE ETERNAL PRESENT (1973, 6 min, 16mm)<br />A FILM OF THEIR 1973 SPRING TOUR COMMISSIONED BY CHRISTIAN WORLD LIBERATION FRONT OF BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA (1974, 11.5 min, 16mm)<br /><br />FILM IN WHICH&hellip;, INSTITUTIONAL QUALITY, and FILM OF THEIR 1973 SPRING TOUR have been preserved by Anthology Film Archives through the National Film Preservation Foundation&rsquo;s Avant-Garde Masters Grant program and The Film Foundation. Funding provided by the George Lucas Family Foundation.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 70 min.</p> Sunday, November 25 ADAM’S RIB http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50076 <p>&ldquo;As if reversing the condition of the world of the pair in HIS GIRL FRIDAY, the pair in ADAM&rsquo;S RIB are emphatically at home at home. George Cukor thoroughly details their inhabitation of their private world for us &ndash; we are invited into every room in their two-story apartment, from living room and study and kitchen to bedroom and dressing room and bathroom, and we witness every interaction between them from sexual invitations and drinking and cooking together to massaging one another. Our presence there becomes so natural, returning each night, that we recall with surprise that this is, with one minor exception, the only member of our genre in which we see the pair in their own home at all.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Sunday, November 25 EC: LAUREL AND HARDY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50107 <p>&ldquo;Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy are the movies&rsquo; greatest comic duo, the quintessential dumb and dumber odd couple. Though critically overshadowed by Chaplin, Keaton, and Lloyd, they were enormously popular, and proved a major influence on Abbott &amp; Costello, Lucille Ball &amp; Vivian Vance, and Jackie Gleason &amp; Art Carney, not to mention Samuel Beckett (they were an inspiration for WAITING FOR GODOT), Roman Polanski (who paid homage to them in his existentialist short films FAT AND LEAN and TWO MEN AND A WARDROBE), and Ken Jacobs (whose ONTIC ANTICS deconstructs one of their films).&rdquo; &ndash;David Mulkins<br /><br />Special thanks to Ken &amp; Flo Jacobs.<br /><br />James Parrott TWO TARS (1928, 20 min, 16mm, silent)<br />James Parrott BRATS (1930, 21 min, 16mm)<br />James Parrott HOG WILD (1930, 19 min, 16mm)<br />James W. Horne ONE GOOD TURN (1931, 20 min, 16mm)<br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Sunday, November 25 IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50057 <p>&ldquo;[IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT is a film] about being hungry, or hungering, where hungering is a metaphor for imagining, in particular imagining a better, or satisfying, way to live. [&hellip;] What this pair does together is less important than the fact that they do whatever it is together, that they know how to spend time together, even that they would rather waste time together than do anything else &ndash; except that no time they are together could be wasted.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell<br /><br />&ldquo;I wish to ponder [the film&rsquo;s] central figure of the barrier-screen, I daresay the most famous blanket in the history of drama. I am not unaware that some of my readers&hellip;will not fully credit the possibility that a comic barrier, hardly more than a prop in a traveling salesman joke, can invoke issues of metaphysical isolation and of the possibility of community &ndash;&nbsp;<em>must</em>invoke them if this film&rsquo;s comedy is to be understood. [&hellip;] The blanket dividing the space, and falling between the beds, is the man&rsquo;s idea as the principal pair, for the first of three times we will know about, prepare to share a cabin in an auto camp. The woman is understandably skeptical: &lsquo;That, I suppose, makes everything all right.&rsquo; He replies that he likes privacy when he retires, that prying eyes annoy him, and goes on at once to situate the blanket allegorically: &lsquo;Behold the Walls of Jericho. Maybe not as thick as the ones Joshua blew down with his trumpet, but a lot safer. You see, I have no trumpet.&rsquo; Wise in the ways of Hollywood symbolism, as generally obvious as the raising and lowering of a flag, we could already predict that the action of the film will close with the walls tumbling down. But then let us be wise enough, if we care about this film, to care about the rigors of this symbolism. The question the narrative must ask itself is how to get them to tumble. That this is a question, and the kind of question it is, is declared late in the film when the second blanket is shown unceremoniously pulled down by the suspicious owners of this second auto camp. Of course it is easy to pull down if you do not know what it is, or care. So an early requirement for its correct tumbling is that the pair come to share a fantasy of what is holding it up.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Sunday, November 25 EC: LÉGER & MURPHY / PICABIA & CLAIR / MAN RAY & DUCHAMP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50108 <p>Fernand L&eacute;ger &amp; Dudley Murphy<br />BALLET M&Eacute;CANIQUE (1924, 19 min, 35mm, silent. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />&ldquo;The two fundamental works of the graphic cinema from the 1920s made without animation were Fernand L&eacute;ger&rsquo;s BALLET M&Eacute;CANIQUE and Marcel Duchamp&rsquo;s ANEMIC CINEMA. By extending a metaphor from several of his paintings into film, L&eacute;ger compared a universe of human actions and everyday objects to the functions of a machine.&rdquo; &ndash;P. Adams Sitney, VISIONARY FILM<br /><br />Ren&eacute; Clair &amp; Francis Picabia<br />ENTR&rsquo;ACTE (1924, 22 min, 35mm)<br />One of the indisputable masterpieces of Dada cinema, ENTR&rsquo;ACTE was created, as its title suggests, to function as a diversion in between the two acts of Francis Picabia and Erik Satie&rsquo;s avant-garde ballet REL&Acirc;CHE.<br /><br />Man Ray<br />LE RETOUR &Agrave; LA RAISON (1923, 2 min, 16mm, silent)<br />&Eacute;TOILE DE MER (1927, 13 min, 16mm, silent)<br />EMAK BAKIA (1927, 18 min, 35mm, silent)<br />&ldquo;All the films I have made have been improvisations. I did not write scenarios. It was automatic cinema. I worked alone. My intention was to set in motion the compositions I made in photography. As for the camera, I use it to capture something I do not want to paint. But I am not interested in producing &lsquo;beautiful photography&rsquo; for the cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;Man Ray, &ldquo;All the Films I Have Made&rdquo; (1965)<br /><br />Marcel Duchamp &amp; Man Ray<br />ANEMIC CINEMA (1926, 7 min, 35mm, silent)<br />&ldquo;Duchamp alternates head-on views of his illusion-producing roto-reliefs with similarly turned discs of words, elaborate French puns printed spirally, creating a fluctuation of illusory depth within a very narrow spectrum (from the slightly convex or slightly concave illusions) to the flat readings. In this, his only film, Duchamp typically crystallized the significance of the graphic film.&rdquo; &ndash;P. Adams Sitney, VISIONARY FILM<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Sunday, November 25 THE AWFUL TRUTH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50060 <p>Preserved print courtesy of the UCLA Film &amp; Television Archive.<br /><br />&ldquo;You learn to look, in a McCarey scene, for the disturbing current under an agreeable surface. He has the power to walk a scene right to that verge at which the comic is no longer comic, without either losing the humor or letting the humor deny the humanity of its victims. (Not for nothing is he the director of the Marx brothers as well as of LOVE AFFAIR, 1939, also with Irene Dunne.)&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell<br /><br />&ldquo;Nietzsche&rsquo;s vision of becoming a child and overcoming revenge is tied up with the achievement of a new vision of time, or a new stance toward it, an acceptance of Eternal Recurrence. And here we are, at the concluding image of THE AWFUL TRUTH, watching two childlike figures returning, and meant to return as long as they exist, into a clock-house, a home of time, to inhabit time anew. How can my linking of Friedrich Nietzsche and Leo McCarey not be chance? How&nbsp;<em>can</em>it be chance? All you need to accept in order to accept the connection are two propositions: that Nietzsche and McCarey are each originals, or anyway that each works on native ground, within which each knows and can mean what he does; and that there are certain truths to these matters which discover where the concepts come together of time and of childhood and of forgiveness and of overcoming revenge and of an acceptance of the repetitive needs of the body and the soul &ndash; of one&rsquo;s motions and one&rsquo;s motives, one&rsquo;s ecstasies and routines, one&rsquo;s sexuality and one&rsquo;s loves &ndash; as the truths of oneself. They will, whatever we discover, be awful truths, since otherwise why do truths about ourselves take such pains to find and to say?&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Sunday, November 25 HIS GIRL FRIDAY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50070 <p>Preserved print courtesy of the UCLA Film &amp; Television Archive.<br /><br />&ldquo;The restaurant sequence with Walter, Hildy, and Bruce is brilliant and satisfying beyond praise. It takes place in the only comforting environment in a film of claustrophobic sets. But the beauty of the sequence lies in the way it plays for these characters, especially for the central pair. [&hellip;] The kicks on the shin Hildy gives Walter under the table are familiar gestures of propriety and intimacy; and the pair communicate not only by way of feet and hand signals but in a lingo and tempo, and about events present and past, that Bruce can have no part in. They simply&nbsp;<em>appreciate</em>one another more than either of them appreciates anyone else, and they would rather be appreciated by one another more than by anyone else. They just are at home with one another, whether or not they can live together under the same roof, that is, find a roof they can live together under.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell<br /><br /><strong><em>The screening on Sat, Nov 24 will be introduced by Cathleen Cavell, Stanley Cavell&rsquo;s wife!</em></strong></p> Monday, November 26 FLAHERTY NYC, PROG. 5: LIVING CONDITIONS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49889 <p>Co-presented with Cinema Tropical. Betzab&eacute; Garc&iacute;a in person.<br /><br />Through two radically different documentaries, the Mexico City-based filmmaker Betzab&eacute; Garc&iacute;a creates a multi-layered record of the day-to-day in a once prosperous town in Mexico&rsquo;s Sinaloa state. Depicting a town flooded by the careless construction of a government dam, and abandoned by all but a few small families, these films examine the state of life in a landscape haunted by rising waters and nightly terrors from unseen intruders.<br /><br />Betzab&eacute; Garc&iacute;a UNSILENCED (2016, 10 min, digital)<br /><br />Betzab&eacute; Garc&iacute;a<br />KINGS OF NOWHERE<br />2015, 83 min, DCP<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.<br /><br /></p> Monday, November 26 THE PHILADELPHIA STORY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50066 <p>&ldquo;Perhaps the most obvious difference of THE PHILADELPHIA STORY from its companion members in the genre of remarriage is that it has two heroes, two leading men who are honorable and likable enough for their happiness at the end to make us happy. A good reason for this double presence is to allow us, or to force us, to figure that while each of these men seems a fit candidate for the hand of the heroine [Katharine Hepburn], while each loves and appreciates her, and she each of them, one of them is chosen by the genre, as it were, as the more perfectly fit. But on what ground? What has Cary Grant got that James Stewart hasn&rsquo;t got? What is the relevant difference between them?&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Monday, November 26 THE LADY EVE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50073 <p>&ldquo;Let us approach [the protagonists] by getting deeper into this film&rsquo;s identifying of itself with the tradition of romance. Take first the feature of the action&rsquo;s moving from a starting place of impasse to a place Frye calls &lsquo;the green world,&rsquo; a place in which perspective and renewal are to be achieved. In A MIDSUMMER NIGHT&rsquo;S DREAM this place is a forest inhabited by fairies, explicitly a place of dreams and magic; in THE WINTER&rsquo;S TALE the place is the rural society of Bohemia; &hellip;in THE TEMPEST it occupies the entire setting of the action, with the framing larger world supplied by narrative speeches; in BRINGING UP BABY, THE AWFUL TRUTH, and ADAM&rsquo;S RIB, in addition to THE LADY EVE&hellip;this locale is called Connecticut. Strictly speaking, in THE LADY EVE the place is called &lsquo;Conneckticut,&rsquo; and it is all but explicitly cited as a mythical location, since nobody is quite sure how you get there, or anyway how a lady gets there. This is Preston Sturges showing off at once his powers of parody and his knowledge of his subject, and giving us fair warning: in his green world the mind or plot will not only be cleared and restored, it will be darkened and frozen.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Tuesday, November 27 NYWIFT: FORGOTTEN BAYOU http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49904 <p>Petra Terzi (Director/Writer/Producer/NYWIFT Member)<br />DIRTY ROSES<br />2017, 6 min, digital<br />A humanitarian docudrama about the disabled persons and families who came from the Arab world to Greece as economic or political refugees.<br /><br />Petra Terzi (Director/Writer/Producer/NYWIFT Member) &amp; Thalia Alexiou (Writer/Producer/NYWIFT Member)<br />49 YEARS AFTER: ABOVE LIMITS<br />2017, 9 min, digital<br />In 1960, on the Greek Island of Rhodes, Elias tells his daughter Sofia a story of WWII, about his friendship with a German soldier.<br /><br />Petra Terzi (Director/Writer/Producer/NYWIFT Member), Thalia Alexiou (Writer/Producer/NYWIFT Member) &amp; Patience Okhuofu (Cinematographer/NYWIFT Member)<br />49 YEARS AFTER: THE GIFTED<br />2018, 7 min, digital<br />A drama based on the true story of a New York holistic therapist and her clairvoyant childhood in Greece.<br /><br />Victoria Greene (Director/Producer/NYWIFT Member)<br />FORGOTTEN BAYOU<br />2017, 70 min, digital<br />In 2012 a sinkhole swallowed a group of swamps in Bayou Corne, Louisiana, leaving residents with an impossible choice: to start their lives over elsewhere, or stay and face the risks. Featuring interviews from current and former community members, industry employees, scientists, and government officials, FORGOTTEN BAYOU chronicles the events leading up to the tragedy as well as its continuing impact.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.<br /><br /></p> Tuesday, November 27 ADAM’S RIB http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50077 <p>&ldquo;As if reversing the condition of the world of the pair in HIS GIRL FRIDAY, the pair in ADAM&rsquo;S RIB are emphatically at home at home. George Cukor thoroughly details their inhabitation of their private world for us &ndash; we are invited into every room in their two-story apartment, from living room and study and kitchen to bedroom and dressing room and bathroom, and we witness every interaction between them from sexual invitations and drinking and cooking together to massaging one another. Our presence there becomes so natural, returning each night, that we recall with surprise that this is, with one minor exception, the only member of our genre in which we see the pair in their own home at all.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Tuesday, November 27 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49949 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, November 28 BRINGING UP BABY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50063 <p>&ldquo;BRINGING UP BABY presents the purest example of a relationship in which the pair do next to nothing practical throughout our knowledge of them; what they do is something like play games; you could almost say they merely have fun together, except that it takes the entire course of the film for the man to come to the essential insight about himself that he was throughout having fun. I would like to say that they achieve purposefulness without purpose. It is because of this purity of action, I believe, that people sometimes find BRINGING UP BABY the hardest of these films to take.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Wednesday, November 28 THE LADY EVE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50074 <p>&ldquo;Let us approach [the protagonists] by getting deeper into this film&rsquo;s identifying of itself with the tradition of romance. Take first the feature of the action&rsquo;s moving from a starting place of impasse to a place Frye calls &lsquo;the green world,&rsquo; a place in which perspective and renewal are to be achieved. In A MIDSUMMER NIGHT&rsquo;S DREAM this place is a forest inhabited by fairies, explicitly a place of dreams and magic; in THE WINTER&rsquo;S TALE the place is the rural society of Bohemia; &hellip;in THE TEMPEST it occupies the entire setting of the action, with the framing larger world supplied by narrative speeches; in BRINGING UP BABY, THE AWFUL TRUTH, and ADAM&rsquo;S RIB, in addition to THE LADY EVE&hellip;this locale is called Connecticut. Strictly speaking, in THE LADY EVE the place is called &lsquo;Conneckticut,&rsquo; and it is all but explicitly cited as a mythical location, since nobody is quite sure how you get there, or anyway how a lady gets there. This is Preston Sturges showing off at once his powers of parody and his knowledge of his subject, and giving us fair warning: in his green world the mind or plot will not only be cleared and restored, it will be darkened and frozen.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Wednesday, November 28 THE PHILADELPHIA STORY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50067 <p>&ldquo;Perhaps the most obvious difference of THE PHILADELPHIA STORY from its companion members in the genre of remarriage is that it has two heroes, two leading men who are honorable and likable enough for their happiness at the end to make us happy. A good reason for this double presence is to allow us, or to force us, to figure that while each of these men seems a fit candidate for the hand of the heroine [Katharine Hepburn], while each loves and appreciates her, and she each of them, one of them is chosen by the genre, as it were, as the more perfectly fit. But on what ground? What has Cary Grant got that James Stewart hasn&rsquo;t got? What is the relevant difference between them?&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Thursday, November 29 ISM, ISM, ISM: EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA IN LATIN AMERICA, PGM 1: DREAMS OF SUITCASES AND A BLUE LOBSTER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50081 <p>Latin America has given rise to several auteurs whose films are characterized by disturbing, dream-like imagery, absurdist juxtapositions, and other devices characteristic of Surrealism (including Alejandro Jodorowsky and Rafael Corkidi), while many European Surrealists fled to Latin America to escape from fascism (most famously, Luis Bu&ntilde;uel). This program highlights some less familiar short films that share surrealist preoccupations, including the Colombian treasure THE BLUE LOBSTER, Argentine photographer Horacio Coppola&rsquo;s TRAUM (SUE&Ntilde;O) (made while he was studying at the Bauhaus), and THE SUITCASE by renowned Chilean director Ra&uacute;l Ruiz. The late Luis Ernesto Arocha contributes a study of Bernando Salcedo&rsquo;s assemblage sculptures, while Mariana Botey&rsquo;s EL DEDAL DE ROSAS represents more contemporary practices.<br /><br />&Aacute;lvaro Cepeda Samudio &amp; Gabriel Garc&iacute;a M&aacute;rquez THE BLUE LOBSTER / LA LANGOSTA AZUL (olombia, 1954, 29 min, 16mm)<br />Ra&uacute;l Ruiz THE SUITCASE / LA MALETA (Chile, 1963-2008, 20 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />Horacio Coppola TRAUM (SUE&Ntilde;O) (Argentina, 1933, 2 min, 16mm-to-digital, silent)<br />Lu&iacute;s Ernesto Arocha LAS VENTANAS DE SALCEDO (Colombia, 1966, 6 min, 16mm)<br />Mariana Botey EL DEDAL DE ROSAS (Mexico, 1998, 13 min, Super-8mm-to-digital)<br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Thursday, November 29 ADAM’S RIB http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50078 <p>&ldquo;As if reversing the condition of the world of the pair in HIS GIRL FRIDAY, the pair in ADAM&rsquo;S RIB are emphatically at home at home. George Cukor thoroughly details their inhabitation of their private world for us &ndash; we are invited into every room in their two-story apartment, from living room and study and kitchen to bedroom and dressing room and bathroom, and we witness every interaction between them from sexual invitations and drinking and cooking together to massaging one another. Our presence there becomes so natural, returning each night, that we recall with surprise that this is, with one minor exception, the only member of our genre in which we see the pair in their own home at all.&rdquo; &ndash;Stanley Cavell</p> Thursday, November 29 ISM, ISM, ISM: EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA IN LATIN AMERICA, PGM 2: CINE RECICLADO / RECYCLED CINEMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50083 <p>In the spirit of Oswald de Andrade&rsquo;s landmark 1928 provocation, the Manifesto Antrop&oacute;fago, this program features works that engage in found footage filmmaking, a subaltern practice of decolonization and critique through the collage of appropriated images and audio. This practice, sometimes called &ldquo;recycled cinema,&rdquo; &ldquo;d&eacute;tournement,&rdquo; or &ldquo;cinema of appropriation,&rdquo; has particular resonance in the region, where outsiders&rsquo; misrepresentations often dominate the local cinematic productions on screens. For &lsquo;COWBOY&rsquo; AND &lsquo;INDIAN&rsquo; FILM (1958), Nuyorican artist Raphael Monta&ntilde;ez Ortiz took a print of Anthony Mann&rsquo;s WINCHESTER &rsquo;73 and hacked the reels to pieces with a tomahawk &ldquo;to release their evil.&rdquo; Placing the film fragments in a medicine bag, he performed a ritual exorcism inspired by his Yaqui grandfather before splicing together the random fragments, some upside down and others right side up. A Cuban newsreel from 1960 shows the triumphant supporters of the Revolution taking over the former offices of major Hollywood studios, and repurposes the reels found within. The progeny of these forerunners are diverse in their strategies and aims, ranging from Ricardo Nicolayevsky&rsquo;s mile-a-minute cinematic sprint to Artemio&rsquo;s mash-up of Walt Disney&rsquo;s adaptations of WINNIE THE POOH and Francis Ford Coppola&rsquo;s APOCALYPSE NOW.<br /><br />Alfredo Salom&oacute;n NO D.R. (Mexico, 2002, 1 min, digital)<br />Instituto Cubano del Arte e Industria Cinematogr&aacute;ficos NEWSREEL 49 (Cuba, 1960, 1 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />Rafael Monta&ntilde;ez Ortiz &lsquo;COWBOY&rsquo; AND &lsquo;INDIAN&rsquo; FILM (USA, 1958, 2 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />Nicol&aacute;s Guill&eacute;n Landri&aacute;n DESDE LA HAVANA &iexcl;1969! RECORDAR (Cuba, 1969, 17 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />Ricardo Nicolayevsky THE BIG WACK (Mexico, 2002, 2.5 min, digital)<br />Marisol Trujillo, Miriam Talavera, and Pep&iacute;n Rodriguez ORACI&Oacute;N POR MARILYN MONROE (Cuba, 1983, 8 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />Artemio APOOHCALYPSE NOW (Mexico, 2002, 8 min, digital)<br />Eduardo Menz LAS MUJERES DE PINOCHET (Canada/Chile, 2004, 12 min, digital)<br />Nicolas Testoni LAS RUINAS DE BAH&Iacute;A BLANCA (Argentina, 2012, 5.5 min, digital)<br />Taller Independiente de Cine Experimental POBRE DEL CANTOR (Mexico, 1978, 2 min, Super-8mm-to-digital)<br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.</p> Thursday, November 29 ISM, ISM, ISM: EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA IN LATIN AMERICA, PGM 3: META: CINEMA CRITIQUES CINEMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50085 <p>Working in a reflexive mode, the filmmakers in this program contemplate their chosen medium, its history, defining characteristics, and iconic movements. If there exists any specifically Latin American mode of meta-cinema, THE VAMPIRES OF POVERTY (1977), by Luis Ospi&ntilde;a and Carlos Mayolo, is one of the starting points of that tradition, a reflection on the representation of poverty in Latin America. Ospi&ntilde;a and Mayolo accompanied the 1978 Parisian premiere with a manifesto entitled &ldquo;What is Poverty Porn?&rdquo;, which marked a new level of self-awareness and critique surrounding the foreign perception of Latin American film. CINEPOLIS, THE FILM CAPITAL (2003) presents an insider&rsquo;s unsettling perspective on the everyday world of image-making and image consumption. The cinematic apparatus is foregrounded in Enrique Colina Barnet&rsquo;s CHAPUCER&Iacute;AS (1987), a Cuban critique of flawed and careless production, while the Brazilian short DUEL (1973), by Daniel Santiago, is a conceptual game that represents the tensions between Super 8 and 16mm filmmakers.<br /><br />Luis Ospi&ntilde;a &amp; Carlos Mayolo THE VAMPIRES OF POVERTY / AGARRANDO PUEBLO (Colombia, 1977, 29 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />Daniel Santiago DUEL / DUELO (Brazil, 1979, 3 min, Super-8mm/16mm-to-digital)<br />Ximena Cuevas CINEPOLIS, THE FILM CAPITAL / CINEPOLIS, LA CAPITAL DEL CINE (Mexico, 2003, 22 min, digital)<br />Teo Hernandez SOUVENIR DE CANNES (Mexico/France, 1982, 12 min, Super-8mm-to-digital)<br />Enrique Colina CHAPUCER&Iacute;AS (Cuba, 1987, 11 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Friday, November 30 ELECTRO-PYTHAGORAS (A PORTRAIT OF MARTIN BARTLETT) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-49986 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With ELECTRO-PYTHAGORAS, Luke Fowler pays tribute to the work and musical ideas of Martin Bartlett (1939-93), a proudly gay Canadian composer who during the 1970s and 80s pioneered the use of the &lsquo;microcomputer.&rsquo; Bartlett is hardly recognized, never mind canonized, in cultural life. He researched relationships with technology and was particularly interested in handmade electronics where, as he states in one of his performances, &ldquo;the intimacy of handcraftedness softens the technological anonymity creating individual difference making each instrument a topography of uncertainties with which we become acquainted through practice.&rdquo; Far from a staid, conventional documentary portrait, ELECTRO-PYTHAGORAS utilizes a wealth of archival materials to form a dense, ingeniously edited and layered film, a rigorous orchestration of sound and image that channels Bartlett&rsquo;s creative experiments as much as it documents them.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fowler may be applying his skills of assemblage to suggest a homology between Bartlett&rsquo;s creative and sexual life. It would be glib to push the idea too far, but one can&rsquo;t entirely deny that, as we learn from Bartlett&rsquo;s correspondence, he enjoyed being gay, refusing to accept marginality. And if just intonation entails bringing the marginalized forward &ndash; &lsquo;queering the pitch,&rsquo; as it were &ndash; then why assume some kind of mind/body compartmentalization?&rdquo; &ndash;Michael Sicinski, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />Luke Fowler FOR CHRISTIAN (2016, 7 min, 16mm)<br />A portrait of composer Christian Wolff, Fowler&rsquo;s FOR CHRISTIAN comprises excerpts from a long interview and footage shot at Wolff and his wife&rsquo;s Vermont farm, and is bookended by two of Wolff&rsquo;s compositions, one dedicated to Alvin Lucier and the other to David Tudor.<br /><br />Luke Fowler COUNTRY GRAMMAR (WITH SUE TOMPKINS) (2017, 18.5 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />This film focuses on artist and musician Sue Tompkins&rsquo;s performance &ldquo;Country Grammar,&rdquo; created in 2003, one of her earliest pieces performed within a gallery context.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Friday, November 30 ISM, ISM, ISM: EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA IN LATIN AMERICA, PGM 4: ESTRELLAS DEL AYER: LATIN CAMP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=11&year=2018#showing-50087 <p>If nostalgia signals the impossibility of a return to origins, queer nostalgia is the salvaging of a symbolic past. The filmmakers featured here borrow an alternative origin from Hollywood stars; these figures are also a site for mining, appropriation, and excess, forming private and collective mythologies that work against linear conceptions of time or history. This program proposes a new constellation of Latin/o-American fascination with Hollywood glamour, starlets, and performative extravagance: Ecuadorian artist Eduardo Sol&aacute; Franco&rsquo;s recreation of Hollywood&rsquo;s Herculean heroes and mythological fantasies; Jos&eacute; Rodr&iacute;guez Soltero&rsquo;s classic LUPE; Teo Hernandez&rsquo;s homage to Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, Lupe V&eacute;lez, and Marlene Dietrich, replete with campy nods to the star system; and a raunchy and provocative interpretation of Olga Guillot, &ldquo;the Queen of the Bolero,&rdquo; in Horacio Vallereggio&rsquo;s A OLGA.<br /><br />Teo Hernandez ESTRELLAS DEL AYER (Mexico/France, 1969, 9 min, Super-8mm-to-digital)<br />Eduardo Sol&aacute; Franco ENCUENTROS IMPOSIBLES (Ecuador/Spain, 1959, 7.5 min, 8mm-to-digital, silent)<br />Horacio Vallereggio A OLGA (Argentina, 1975, 7 min, Super-8mm-to-digital)<br />Jos&eacute; Rodr&iacute;guez Soltero LUPE (USA, 1966, 49 min, 16mm)<br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Friday, November 30 EC: CHRISTOPHER MACLAINE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50109 <p>&ldquo;The few facts that are known about Maclaine are, at best, sketchy. He was a published poet, a sort of down and out San Francisco bohemian who later became one of the psychic casualties of that scene. His last years were spent at Sunnyacres, a state mental hospital in Fairfield, California. These films, along with Ron Rice&rsquo;s, are clearly the most significant work to come out of the beat period.&rdquo; &ndash;J.J. Murphy<br /><br />All films preserved by Anthology Film Archives.<br /><br />THE MAN WHO INVENTED GOLD (1957, 14 min, 16mm)<br />BEAT (1958, 6 min, 16mm)<br />SCOTCH HOP (1959, 5.5 min, 16mm)<br />THE END (1953, 35 min, 16mm)<br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.<br /><br />[<em><strong>THE MAN WHO INVENTED GOLD, BEAT, and SCOTCH HOP are not part of the Essential Cinema collection, but they are included here as a special bonus.</strong></em>]</p> Saturday, December 01 BOLÍVAR, TROPICAL SYMPHONY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50091 <p>(BOL&Iacute;VAR, SINFON&Iacute;A TROPIKAL)<br /><br />In the 1980s, the multifaceted Venezuelan artist, painter, and filmmaker Diego R&iacute;squez (who passed away in January 2018) undertook the daunting project of creating a trilogy of films about the real and mythical histories of the Latin American continent. The first part of the trilogy, and R&iacute;squez&rsquo;s feature debut, was BOL&Iacute;VAR, TROPICAL SYMPHONY, which became the first Super 8 film to be selected for the Directors&rsquo; Fortnight at the Cannes Film Festival. R&iacute;squez here foregoes dialogue to create an unconventional and highly allusive cinematic exploration of the life and death of South America&rsquo;s famed libertador, Sim&oacute;n Bol&iacute;var, in which two separate actors embody dueling conceptions of this historical figure.<br /><br />&ldquo;With stunningly rich and complex visual images, R&iacute;squez&rsquo;s films eschew all dialogue yet present a coherent and critical reinterpretation of Venezuelan history.&rdquo; &ndash;Ana M. L&oacute;pez</p> Saturday, December 01 ELECTRO-PYTHAGORAS (A PORTRAIT OF MARTIN BARTLETT) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-49987 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With ELECTRO-PYTHAGORAS, Luke Fowler pays tribute to the work and musical ideas of Martin Bartlett (1939-93), a proudly gay Canadian composer who during the 1970s and 80s pioneered the use of the &lsquo;microcomputer.&rsquo; Bartlett is hardly recognized, never mind canonized, in cultural life. He researched relationships with technology and was particularly interested in handmade electronics where, as he states in one of his performances, &ldquo;the intimacy of handcraftedness softens the technological anonymity creating individual difference making each instrument a topography of uncertainties with which we become acquainted through practice.&rdquo; Far from a staid, conventional documentary portrait, ELECTRO-PYTHAGORAS utilizes a wealth of archival materials to form a dense, ingeniously edited and layered film, a rigorous orchestration of sound and image that channels Bartlett&rsquo;s creative experiments as much as it documents them.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fowler may be applying his skills of assemblage to suggest a homology between Bartlett&rsquo;s creative and sexual life. It would be glib to push the idea too far, but one can&rsquo;t entirely deny that, as we learn from Bartlett&rsquo;s correspondence, he enjoyed being gay, refusing to accept marginality. And if just intonation entails bringing the marginalized forward &ndash; &lsquo;queering the pitch,&rsquo; as it were &ndash; then why assume some kind of mind/body compartmentalization?&rdquo; &ndash;Michael Sicinski, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />Luke Fowler FOR CHRISTIAN (2016, 7 min, 16mm)<br />A portrait of composer Christian Wolff, Fowler&rsquo;s FOR CHRISTIAN comprises excerpts from a long interview and footage shot at Wolff and his wife&rsquo;s Vermont farm, and is bookended by two of Wolff&rsquo;s compositions, one dedicated to Alvin Lucier and the other to David Tudor.<br /><br />Luke Fowler COUNTRY GRAMMAR (WITH SUE TOMPKINS) (2017, 18.5 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />This film focuses on artist and musician Sue Tompkins&rsquo;s performance &ldquo;Country Grammar,&rdquo; created in 2003, one of her earliest pieces performed within a gallery context.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Saturday, December 01 ORINOKO, NEW WORLD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50094 <p>(ORINOKO, NUEVO MUNDO)<br /><br />Surreal and multi-faceted, ORINOKO presents a speechless vision of the history of Venezuela and the Orinoco River basin before and after conquest. Among the participating figures are Europeans such as Columbus, Walter Raleigh, and Alexander von Humboldt, but seen through the eyes of the indigenous peoples whose lives were upended by colonization.<br /><br />&ldquo;ORINOKO inverts the logic seen in illustrations that appear in books documenting the expeditions of the 16th century, such as those by Theodor de Bry, whose frontispieces featured images of indigenous people. The frontispieces of ORINOKO feature the colonizers and their myths. America, represented in the form of its landscape (the Amazonian jungle), collects European myths and objects. Conceptual art, performance, and Super 8 reverse the structures of power, giving us an image of Europe as seen from America.&rdquo; &ndash;Isabel Arredondo, &ldquo;The Performative in Venezuelan Experimental Film,&rdquo; from ISM, ISM, ISM: EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA IN LATIN AMERICA</p> Saturday, December 01 ELECTRO-PYTHAGORAS (A PORTRAIT OF MARTIN BARTLETT) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-49988 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With ELECTRO-PYTHAGORAS, Luke Fowler pays tribute to the work and musical ideas of Martin Bartlett (1939-93), a proudly gay Canadian composer who during the 1970s and 80s pioneered the use of the &lsquo;microcomputer.&rsquo; Bartlett is hardly recognized, never mind canonized, in cultural life. He researched relationships with technology and was particularly interested in handmade electronics where, as he states in one of his performances, &ldquo;the intimacy of handcraftedness softens the technological anonymity creating individual difference making each instrument a topography of uncertainties with which we become acquainted through practice.&rdquo; Far from a staid, conventional documentary portrait, ELECTRO-PYTHAGORAS utilizes a wealth of archival materials to form a dense, ingeniously edited and layered film, a rigorous orchestration of sound and image that channels Bartlett&rsquo;s creative experiments as much as it documents them.<br /><br />&ldquo;Fowler may be applying his skills of assemblage to suggest a homology between Bartlett&rsquo;s creative and sexual life. It would be glib to push the idea too far, but one can&rsquo;t entirely deny that, as we learn from Bartlett&rsquo;s correspondence, he enjoyed being gay, refusing to accept marginality. And if just intonation entails bringing the marginalized forward &ndash; &lsquo;queering the pitch,&rsquo; as it were &ndash; then why assume some kind of mind/body compartmentalization?&rdquo; &ndash;Michael Sicinski, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />Luke Fowler FOR CHRISTIAN (2016, 7 min, 16mm)<br />A portrait of composer Christian Wolff, Fowler&rsquo;s FOR CHRISTIAN comprises excerpts from a long interview and footage shot at Wolff and his wife&rsquo;s Vermont farm, and is bookended by two of Wolff&rsquo;s compositions, one dedicated to Alvin Lucier and the other to David Tudor.<br /><br />Luke Fowler COUNTRY GRAMMAR (WITH SUE TOMPKINS) (2017, 18.5 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />This film focuses on artist and musician Sue Tompkins&rsquo;s performance &ldquo;Country Grammar,&rdquo; created in 2003, one of her earliest pieces performed within a gallery context.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Saturday, December 01 AMÉRIKA, TERRA INCÓGNITA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50097 <p>The final part in the trilogy, AM&Eacute;RIKA, TERRA INC&Oacute;GNITA comprises a series of tableaux vivants offering a visual journey into the reverse perspective of European colonialism &ndash; the journey of a captive Indian into the Spanish court.<br /><br />&ldquo;R&iacute;squez eschews (not without humor) the hagiographic dimension of the &lsquo;myth of the noble savage&rsquo; to focus on the mutual fascination between two different cultures, two different ways of seeing and understanding the world. Rather than a humanist, progressive work, filled with good intentions, AM&Eacute;RIKA is a long waking dream, baroque, flamboyant, and uncannily astonishing&hellip; R&iacute;squez achieves a strange surreal synthesis &ndash; of colors and movement, with a powerful &lsquo;return of the past&rsquo; (accentuated by a tilted, increasingly oneiric framing).&rdquo; &ndash;CAHIERS DU CIN&Eacute;MA<br /><br />&ldquo;From one scene to the next, the film oscillates between a kitsch version of M&eacute;li&egrave;s and a lyrical vision that often reaches real greatness, with breathtaking flashes of beauty.&rdquo; &ndash;Alain Bergala</p> Saturday, December 01