Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Sat, 31 Jan 2015 23:05:24 -0500 TRIAL ON THE ROAD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2015#showing-43723 <p>35mm print from the collection of George Eastman House.<br />&ldquo;Banned for fifteen years, Guerman&rsquo;s solo directorial debut, set during WWII, marries the muscular dynamics of the war film with a more searing, philosophical approach to the thin line between official &lsquo;heroes&rsquo; and &lsquo;traitors.&rsquo; A former Nazi collaborator rejoins his Russian brethren to fight against the Germans; for some partisans, he is and always will be a traitor, but others allow him to prove himself &ndash; and his commitment &ndash; on the battlefield. For Guerman, basic human concepts like loyalty, decency, and trust underline the film&rsquo;s train-like narrative force and breathtaking black-and-white images; government censors, however, angered over the &lsquo;immorality&rsquo; of portraying a former traitor as a hero, accused him of de-heroicizing Soviet history. [&hellip;] Filmed in 1971, the film was finally released in 1986, during a political thaw.&rdquo; &ndash;Jason Sanders, Pacific Film Archive</p> Saturday, January 31 UNE SI JOLIE PETITE PLAGE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2015#showing-43788 <p>With Madeleine Robinson, G&eacute;rard Philipe, and Jean Servais.<br /><br />A deeply melancholy, bleak, but gorgeously photographed noir (the cinematographer is the great Henri Alekan, perhaps best known for Cocteau&rsquo;s BEAUTY AND THE BEAST), UNE SI JOLIE PETITE PLAGE stars G&eacute;rard Philipe as a haunted young man, harboring a dark secret, who returns to the godforsaken coastal village of his childhood. Welcomed by the local townsfolk with suspicion and hostility, and treated to perhaps the most relentless rainfall in the history of cinema, he finds his past catching up with him. This is one of the greatest films by Yves All&eacute;gret, yet another remarkable director from a generation of French filmmakers whose work is ripe for rediscovery.</p> Saturday, January 31 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2015#showing-43834 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Saturday, January 31 MARIUS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2015#showing-43778 <p>With Raimu, Pierre Fresnay, and Orane Demazis. Archival print courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.<br /><br />Having gained fame as a playwright, Marcel Pagnol soon became intoxicated by the possibilities of sound cinema, a fascination that would ultimately lead him to create his own production studios, and to write, produce, and direct numerous films. He began his film career by adapting his own play to create MARIUS, the first in a Marseilles-set trilogy that would later include FANNY (also adapted from the stage-play) and C&Eacute;SAR (which was written directly for the screen). In MARIUS, C&eacute;sar (Raimu) is a cafe owner whose son Marius (Pierre Fresnay) loves Fanny (Orane Demazis), the daughter of a fishmonger, but also longs to live the adventurous life of a sailor. Even though the young couple become lovers and plan to marry, Fanny realizes that she cannot hold Marius from his dreams.<br /><br />&ldquo;Pagnol directed only one of his &lsquo;Fanny Trilogy,&rsquo; as the films MARIUS, FANNY, and C&Eacute;SAR are affectionately known, but he is the true auteur of all three films about the inhabitants of the old port of Marseilles. See one or see all three &ndash; each is a gem on its own.&rdquo; &ndash;Judy Bloch, PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE</p> Saturday, January 31 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2015#showing-43835 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Saturday, January 31 FANNY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2015#showing-43781 <p>With Raimu, Pierre Fresnay, and Orane Demazis. Archival print courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.<br /><br />In the second part of the trilogy, the young and beautiful Fanny discovers that she is pregnant after her lover, Marius, has deserted her to follow the adventurous life of the sea. After finding succor in the kindness of the equally bereaved C&eacute;sar, Fanny reluctantly accepts the marriage offer of an older wealthy suitor Panisse (Charpin), in order to make the child legitimate. Unaware that he is now a father, Marius returns to marry Fanny, but is sent away by his father C&eacute;sar in order to prevent further unhappiness.<br /><br />&ldquo;Orson Welles once called Raimu the greatest actor of the cinema, and it is Raimu&rsquo;s presence that pulls the threads of this twenty-year saga into a beautiful whole. The second film in the trilogy may be Fanny&rsquo;s tragedy, but it is C&eacute;sar&rsquo;s story, as he asserts his strange wisdom and his mad love to create something marvelous &ndash; a family &ndash; out of characters who are all &lsquo;at sea.&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;Judy Bloch, PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE</p> Saturday, January 31 HÔTEL DU NORD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-44032 <p>With Annabella, Jean-Pierre Aumont, Louis Jouvet, and Arletty.<br /><br />This rarely-screened film by Marcel Carn&eacute; (CHILDREN OF PARADISE), made in-between his poetic-realist classics, PORT OF SHADOWS (1938) and LE JOUR SE L&Egrave;VE (1939), takes place at the eponymous Parisian hotel which, thanks to legendary production designer Alexandre Trauner, becomes a major character in its own right. A romantic melodrama featuring Annabella and Jean-Pierre Aumont as star-crossed lovers who have formed a suicide pact, and Louis Jouvet and Arletty as the underworld figures with whom the lovers become entangled, it&rsquo;s an undervalued gem.<br /><br />&ldquo;[A] masterpiece of production design and performance, as exemplified by the fidelity of Trauner&rsquo;s sets and Arletty&rsquo;s role as the &lsquo;tart with the heart&rsquo;. Like PORT OF SHADOWS, H&Ocirc;TEL DU NORD resonates with themes of imprisonment, disillusionment, and the impossibility of escape.&rdquo; &ndash;Ben McCann, SENSES OF CINEMA<br /><br /><strong>PLEASE NOTE: THE JANUARY 23RD SCREENING (WHICH WAS CANCELLED DUE TO THE SNOWSTORM) HAS BEEN RE-SCHEDULED FOR SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1 AT 2:00PM.</strong></p> Sunday, February 01 MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43726 <p>(MOY DRUG IVAN LAPSHIN)<br /><br />Set in provincial Russia in 1935, MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN was banned for fourteen years for its evocative dramatization of one of the darkest periods in Soviet history. A police investigator relentlessly and mercilessly pursues a gang of criminals, but in the process comes to realize the distance between the idealism of the revolutionaries and the grim, frightening reality of the Stalinist era.</p> Sunday, February 01 CÉSAR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43784 <p>With Raimu, Pierre Fresnay, and Orane Demazis. Archival print courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.<br /><br />The final film in Pagnol&rsquo;s trilogy begins with the death of C&eacute;sar&rsquo;s best friend, old Panisse, the town merchant who has devoted his wealth and love to the happiness of his young wife, Fanny, and their son. After the death of Panisse, the son is told by his mother that his real father is the legendary Marius, C&eacute;sar&rsquo;s son, who left Marseilles twenty years earlier to travel the world. Feeling betrayed, the son sets out to find Marius, who is living quietly in a nearby town. The only film in the trilogy that Pagnol directed himself, C&Eacute;SAR is a deeply moving finale to a series of films that is one of the great accomplishments of 1930s French cinema.</p> Sunday, February 01 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43705 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Sunday, February 01 DOUCE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43775 <p>With Odette Joyeux, Madeleine Robinson, and Marguerite Moreno.<br /><br />&ldquo;Autant-Lara was one of the principal figures of the French &lsquo;tradition of quality&rsquo; that flourished during the Nazi occupation, and this 1943 masterpiece, which also introduced the writing team of Pierre Bost and Jean Aurenche, is the first of several great films he made. The radiant Odette Joyeux stars as the title heroine, a socialite who seeks to flee her lavish but suffocating environs with the handsome family caretaker, only to discover that the relationship is doomed. Autant-Lara&rsquo;s exquisite blend of social commentary, lush romanticism, and opulent sets and costumes &ndash; he began his career as a designer &ndash; vividly re-creates France&rsquo;s belle epoque and recalls Orson Welles&rsquo;s THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS both thematically and in its deep-focus exploration of interior space.&rdquo; &ndash;Joshua Katzman, CHICAGO READER</p> Sunday, February 01 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43706 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Sunday, February 01 THE STORY OF A CHEAT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43767 <p>(LE ROMAN D&rsquo;UN TRICHEUR)<br /><br />With Sacha Guitry, Marguerite Moreno, Jacqueline Delubac, and Roger Duchesne.<br /><br />&ldquo;Widely regarded as Guitry&rsquo;s masterpiece&hellip;this 1936 tour de force can be regarded as a kind of concerto for the writer-director-performer&rsquo;s special brand of brittle cleverness. After a credits sequence that introduces us to the film&rsquo;s cast and crew, Guitry settles into a flashback account of how the title hero learned to benefit from cheating over the course of his life. A notoriously anticinematic cineaste whose first love was theater, Guitry nevertheless had a flair for cinematic high jinks when it came to adapting his plays (or in this case a novel) to film, and most of this movie registers as a rather lively and stylishly inventive silent film, with Guitry&rsquo;s character serving as offscreen lecturer. Fran&ccedil;ois Truffaut was sufficiently impressed to dub Guitry a French brother of Lubitsch, though Guitry clearly differs from this master of continental romance in that his own personality invariably overwhelms his characters.&rdquo; &ndash;Jonathan Rosenbaum, CHICAGO READER</p> Sunday, February 01 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43707 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Monday, February 02 LES VISITEURS DU SOIR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43763 <p>With Arletty, Marie D&eacute;a, Fernand Ledoux, and Alain Cuny.<br /><br />LES VISITEURS DU SOIR marked Carn&eacute;&rsquo;s third straight collaboration with both lead actress Arletty and art designer Alexandre Trauner, but it&rsquo;s distinctly different than the poetic realist H&Ocirc;TEL DU NORD and LE JOUR SE L&Egrave;VE: a medieval fable, LES VISITEURS centers on two mysterious strangers who are revealed to be emissaries of the devil. Sent to earth to spread suffering and despair, their mission is foiled by the redemptive power of love. Though Carn&eacute;&rsquo;s retreat from the contemporary settings of his previous films into the distant past (and the realm of lyrical fantasy) may be attributable to the onset of the German occupation, many critics have interpreted the film as an allegory of the Nazi incursion and of the survival of the French spirit during these years.</p> Monday, February 02 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43708 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Monday, February 02 THE RAVEN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43771 <p>(LE CORBEAU)<br /><br />With Pierre Fresnay, Ginette Leclerc, and Micheline Francey.<br /><br />Made during the German occupation, THE RAVEN almost brought Clouzot&rsquo;s career to a halt when it was misinterpreted following the war as anti-French propaganda. But <em>au contraire</em>: it is in fact a withering attack on the collaborationist bourgeois society of Vichy-era France. Upon the appearance of a series of anonymous letters exposing a small town&rsquo;s dirty secrets, the polite veneer of society crumbles as suspicion, hatred, and paranoia rage out of control. A deeply unsettling, unsparing glimpse into the dark heart of human nature, THE RAVEN is one of Clouzot&rsquo;s finest films.</p> Monday, February 02 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43709 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Tuesday, February 03 FLAHERTY NYC: PROGRAM 2: AMERICANA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43802 <p>Mobility. Eccentricity. Entrepreneurship. This program delivers a delightfully haphazard portrait of the United States as viewed through quintessential artifacts: Kevin T. Allen takes us on a tour of repurposed ghost towns; Jean-Fran&ccedil;ois Caissy turns his camera on the audience at a demolition derby; and Steve Wetzel captures the beautifully cracked inventions of a midwestern man trying to turn his house into the future. Tying it all together, the American Road: J&oslash;rgen Leth&rsquo;s motion picture postcards from his journey across America.<br /><br />J&oslash;rgen Leth 66 SCENES FROM AMERICA (1981, 42 min, digital)<br />Jean-Fran&ccedil;ois Caissy DERBY (2014, 11 min, digital)<br />Kevin T. Allen REAL WEST (2014, 29 min, digital)<br />Steve Wetzel FROM THE ARCHIVES OF AN INVENTOR (2009, 18 min, digital)<br />Total running time: ca. 105 min.<br /><br /><strong><em>Allen, Caissy, and Wetzel will be here in person.<br /></em></strong><br />This project is a collaboration with Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts, and made possible with generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and The Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation.<br />This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. <br /><strong><em></em></strong></p> Tuesday, February 03 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43710 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Tuesday, February 03 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43711 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Wednesday, February 04 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43712 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Wednesday, February 04 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43713 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Thursday, February 05 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43714 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Thursday, February 05 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43715 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Friday, February 06 EC: THE MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43844 <p>(CHELOVEK S KINO-APPARATOM)<br />&ldquo;Little introduction is needed for one of the great masterpieces of world cinema, Vertov&rsquo;s extraordinary meditation on then-contemporary Soviet Russian society and the place of filmmakers within it. A kind of &lsquo;city symphony,&rsquo; cataloguing the sights and sounds of urban life, the film is structured across a day, beginning with citizens waking up while machines are revved up. As Vertov shows us, among the first heading off to work is the &lsquo;man with the movie camera,&rsquo; played in the film by his brother and cameraman Mikhail Kaufman. For Vertov, the camera was a kind of infinitely more perfect eye: it could offer details and aspects of the world that might be missed otherwise.&rdquo; &ndash;FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER</p> Friday, February 06 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43716 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Friday, February 06 EC: KINO-EYE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43845 <p>(KINOGLAZ)</p> Saturday, February 07 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43717 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Saturday, February 07 EC: FORWARD, SOVIET! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43843 <p>(SHAGHAI, SOVIET!)</p> Saturday, February 07 EC: ENTHUSIASM, OR SYMPHONY OF THE DON BASIN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43842 <p>(ENTUZIASM: SIMFONIYA DONBASSA)</p> Saturday, February 07 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43718 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Saturday, February 07 EC: A SIXTH OF THE WORLD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43841 <p>(SHESTAIA CHAST MIRA)</p> Sunday, February 08 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43719 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Sunday, February 08 EC: THE ELEVENTH YEAR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43840 <p>(ODINNADTSAYI)</p> Sunday, February 08 EC: THREE SONGS ABOUT LENIN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43839 <p>(TRI PESNI O LENINYE)</p> Sunday, February 08 HARD TO BE A GOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43720 <p>(TRUDNO BYT BOGOM)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Adapted from the novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Distributed by Kino Lorber; special thanks to Gary Palmucci &amp; Rodrigo Brand&atilde;o.<br /><br />When legendary Russian auteur Aleksei Guerman died last year at the age of 74, he left behind a body of work that ranks among the most extraordinary of the last half-century, despite encompassing only six feature films as director. Following his 1967 debut, THE SEVENTH COMPANION, the space between successive Guerman features grew progressively longer, thanks both to political and censorship battles and to his own increasingly extravagant ambition and perfectionism. Thirteen years would elapse between the seminal MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN (1985) and the astounding KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! (1998), a triumphant accomplishment that is one of the most delirious, disorienting, and immersive films in modern cinema.<br /><br />Difficult as it may be to believe, KHRUSTALYOV was not a terminal point &ndash; before his death Guerman created one final film, both longer in gestation and (if possible) even more stupefyingly ambitious. A phantasmagoric adaptation of the revered sci-fi novel by the Strugatsky brothers (authors of the source novel for Tarkosvky&rsquo;s STALKER), HARD TO BE A GOD began percolating in Guerman&rsquo;s consciousness in the mid-1960s, and would actively consume him for the last 15 years of his life. Many Guerman devotees despaired of its ever reaching a final form, and indeed he obsessively edited and tweaked it up until his death. Happily, he brought it close enough to completion for his wife and son to apply the finishing touches immediately after his passing, and the result unmistakably extends the cacophonous, unrestrained maximalism of KHRUSTALYOV.<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD takes place on the planet Arkanar, which is in the midst of its own Middle Ages, a period of violence, filth, and crudeness into which Guerman thrusts viewers without a net. A group of Earth scientists have been sent to Arkanar, but with the proviso that they must not interfere in the planet&rsquo;s political or historical development. Moving through this nightmarish society, in which all those who can read and write are brutally persecuted, one of these scientists, Don Rumata, struggles to remain detached. Treated by the planet&rsquo;s natives as a kind of divinity, he is both godlike and impotent in the face of the planet&rsquo;s chaos and brutality.<br /><br />&ldquo;HARD TO BE A GOD is like stepping into a panoramic Bruegel painting and putting your foot right into a shit-stained corpse&hellip;in a good way. [&hellip;] Guerman retains so little of the science-fiction frame that his black-and-white film becomes the closest thing medieval times may get to a verit&eacute; documentary portrait &ndash; warts, mud, guts, and all. [&hellip;] Its vigor and openness to multiple allegorical readings will endure for years to come.&rdquo; &ndash;Nicolas Rapold, FILM COMMENT<br /><br />&ldquo;Guerman was a Russian filmmaker, but the artists to whom his style here seems most strongly indebted are Dutch: the harried sprawl of Bruegel, the group portraiture effects of Frans Hals, and especially the fantasy horrors imagined by Hieronymus Bosch. Watching HARD TO BE A GOD often feels like wading into the Hell panel of Bosch&rsquo;s Garden of Earthly Delights&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Calum Marsh, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />HARD TO BE A GOD will be having a preview screening as part of the Museum of the Moving Image&rsquo;s &ldquo;First Look&rdquo; festival in early January; visit movingimage.us for more details.<br /><br /><em><strong>In conjunction with the run of HARD TO BE A GOD, we'll be screening three earlier films by Guerman; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/43721">here</a> for more details. <br /><br /></strong></em><strong>A new translation of the Strugatsky brothers&rsquo; novel, Hard to Be a God, is available now from Chicago Review Press; click <a href="http://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/hard-to-be-a-god-products-9781613748282.php?page_id=21">here</a> for more details.</strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> Sunday, February 08 KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43729 <p>(KHRUSTALYOV, MASHINU!)<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Khrustalyov, my car!&rsquo; is supposedly the excited cry for his chauffeur uttered by the infamous Soviet security chief Beria as he hurried from Stalin&rsquo;s deathbed. Guerman&rsquo;s film is a feverish, frantic evocation of Moscow in January 1953 as Stalin lay dying. Consistent with Guerman&rsquo;s habit of observing history indirectly, KHRUSTALYOV follows the itinerary of a surgeon whose life, and that of his family, is thrown into turmoil by the infamous &lsquo;Doctor&rsquo;s Plot,&rsquo; in which a group of predominately Jewish Moscow doctors were fingered as members of a conspiracy to assassinate Soviet leaders. Guerman creates a consistently amazing visual and aural rendition of the charged atmosphere of those sad times, in which no point of view is ever fixed, no shadow devoid of possible danger, nor any stray remark free from potentially lethal consequences.&rdquo; &ndash;HARVARD FILM ARCHIVE</p> Monday, February 09 MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43727 <p>(MOY DRUG IVAN LAPSHIN)<br /><br />Set in provincial Russia in 1935, MY FRIEND IVAN LAPSHIN was banned for fourteen years for its evocative dramatization of one of the darkest periods in Soviet history. A police investigator relentlessly and mercilessly pursues a gang of criminals, but in the process comes to realize the distance between the idealism of the revolutionaries and the grim, frightening reality of the Stalinist era.</p> Monday, February 09 TRIAL ON THE ROAD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43724 <p>35mm print from the collection of George Eastman House.<br />&ldquo;Banned for fifteen years, Guerman&rsquo;s solo directorial debut, set during WWII, marries the muscular dynamics of the war film with a more searing, philosophical approach to the thin line between official &lsquo;heroes&rsquo; and &lsquo;traitors.&rsquo; A former Nazi collaborator rejoins his Russian brethren to fight against the Germans; for some partisans, he is and always will be a traitor, but others allow him to prove himself &ndash; and his commitment &ndash; on the battlefield. For Guerman, basic human concepts like loyalty, decency, and trust underline the film&rsquo;s train-like narrative force and breathtaking black-and-white images; government censors, however, angered over the &lsquo;immorality&rsquo; of portraying a former traitor as a hero, accused him of de-heroicizing Soviet history. [&hellip;] Filmed in 1971, the film was finally released in 1986, during a political thaw.&rdquo; &ndash;Jason Sanders, Pacific Film Archive</p> Tuesday, February 10 KHRUSTALYOV, MY CAR! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43730 <p>(KHRUSTALYOV, MASHINU!)<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Khrustalyov, my car!&rsquo; is supposedly the excited cry for his chauffeur uttered by the infamous Soviet security chief Beria as he hurried from Stalin&rsquo;s deathbed. Guerman&rsquo;s film is a feverish, frantic evocation of Moscow in January 1953 as Stalin lay dying. Consistent with Guerman&rsquo;s habit of observing history indirectly, KHRUSTALYOV follows the itinerary of a surgeon whose life, and that of his family, is thrown into turmoil by the infamous &lsquo;Doctor&rsquo;s Plot,&rsquo; in which a group of predominately Jewish Moscow doctors were fingered as members of a conspiracy to assassinate Soviet leaders. Guerman creates a consistently amazing visual and aural rendition of the charged atmosphere of those sad times, in which no point of view is ever fixed, no shadow devoid of possible danger, nor any stray remark free from potentially lethal consequences.&rdquo; &ndash;HARVARD FILM ARCHIVE</p> Tuesday, February 10 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-44010 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, February 11 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-44011 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, February 11 SHOW & TELL: NAM JUNE PAIK & TV LAB: LICENSE TO CREATE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43815 <p>This feature-length documentary chronicles the role of seminal video artist Nam June Paik in the formation of the TV LAB, the experimental division of New York public television station Channel 13/WNET. Between 1972-84 the TV LAB represented an invaluable resource for artists, experimental filmmakers, and documentarians, providing access to equipment, fostering a collaborative community, and nurturing innovative imagery on television. Boasting a blue-screen ChromaKey studio, video synthesizers, and a digital time base corrector, the TV LAB played a huge role in the development of video art, as well as independent media journalism. Influencing the creation of both MTV and &lsquo;reality television,&rsquo; TV LAB changed the way we see television and the world. Exploring the collaborative collisions of the TV LAB, this documentary sheds light on a fascinating era in the history of television, through the prism of one of the giants of 20<sup>th</sup> century video art.<br /><br />Howard Weinberg is a veteran documentary filmmaker who was Founding Producer of The MacNeil/Lehrer Report and Executive Producer of THE DICK CAVETT SHOW. He has produced series and segments for numerous programs including BILL MOYERS&rsquo; JOURNAL, ASSIGNMENT AMERICA WITH STUDS TERKEL, and 60 MINUTES. Weinberg previously directed TOPLESS CELLIST: CHARLOTTE MOORMAN (1995), a documentary profile of the performance artist who was Paik&rsquo;s longtime collaborator.</p> Thursday, February 12 EC: WARHOL / WATSON & WEBBER / WHITNEY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43846 <p>Andy Warhol<br />EAT (1963, 35 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br /><br />James Sibley Watson &amp; Melville Webber<br />FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER (1928, 13 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br /><br />John &amp; James Whitney<br />FILM EXERCISES 1-5 (1943-45, 18 min, 16mm)<br /><br />James Whitney<br />LAPIS (1963-66, 10 min, 16mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Thursday, February 12 WE WON’T GROW OLD TOGETHER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43883 <p>(NOUS NE VIEILLIRONS PAS ENSEMBLE)<br />With Jean Yanne &amp; Marlene Joubert.<br />&ldquo;Far from viewer-friendly, [this film] tells the story of the endless breakups and makeups of a highly unstable yet apparently indissoluble couple. It&rsquo;s a sort of love story told in inverted terms, depicting the protracted end of a five-year affair, with its arbitrary disagreements, sudden mood shifts, moments of irrational anger, and displays of stinging contempt, presented with a genuine, unmeasured violence. &lsquo;You&rsquo;ve never succeeded at anything and you never will&rsquo;, says Jean, a 40-year-old married filmmaker, to his younger, working-class lover Catherine. &lsquo;And do you know why? Because you are vulgar, irremediably vulgar, and not only are you vulgar, you are ordinary.&rsquo; These are the film&rsquo;s most celebrated lines&hellip;a sort of brutalist alternative to the famous line from LOVE STORY: &lsquo;Love means never having to say you&rsquo;re sorry.&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;Dave Kehr, FILM COMMENT</p> Friday, February 13 COSTA DA MORTE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43856 <p>NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />The first feature-length work by Spanish experimental filmmaker Lois Pati&ntilde;o &ndash; whose short films and installations have been exhibited in cinemas, film festivals, galleries, and museums around the world over the last ten years &ndash; COSTA DA MORTE is a stunningly photographed landscape film that works wonders with digital video. It&rsquo;s a portrait of the eponymous coastal region of Galicia, which, thanks to its treacherously rocky shore and frequent storms, is famed for the numerous shipwrecks it has seen over the years &ndash; the name translates as &ldquo;Coast of Death,&rdquo; or in Galician, &ldquo;Fisterra&rdquo;: &ldquo;end of the world.&rdquo; Made in collaboration with photographer Carla Andrade, Pati&ntilde;o&rsquo;s film consists of a series of fixed, beautifully composed takes, which taken together form a mosaic-like portrait of the region. Many of these takes are extreme long-shots of figures in the landscape, but with the voices recorded (and heard from) up-close. This unusual and strangely disorienting effect, a cognitively dissonant fusion of distance and intimacy, lends COSTA DA MORTE a perceptually challenging dimension that distinguishes it from many superficially similar films. Combined with the locals&rsquo; recounting of some of the area&rsquo;s historical and mythical tales, it adds up to an exquisite and fascinating essay film on the sights, sounds, people, and folklore of the Costa da Morte.<br /><br />&ldquo;Each of the film&rsquo;s segments focuses on one specific piece of Costa da Morte&rsquo;s oceanic, forested, and cliff-strewn region as small human figures move through it, narrating its history to one another. [&hellip;] The cumulative experience of witnessing all these different locations is that of coming to know Costa da Morte as though the region itself were a living character.&rdquo; &ndash;Aaron Cutler, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;Shots of the sea in its more turbulent moods recall such landmark works in the genre as Robert Flaherty&rsquo;s MAN OF ARAN (1934) and Jean Epstein&rsquo;s LE TEMPESTAIRE (1947) &ndash; although Pati&ntilde;o exhibits a lighter touch, as when the idle chatter of the locals is at odds with their miniscule presence within the vastness of the land and seascapes.&rdquo; &ndash;Tony Pipolo, ARTFORUM<br /><br />Special thanks to Graham Swindoll.&nbsp;</p> Friday, February 13 MODERN ROMANCE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2015#showing-43886 <p>With Albert Brooks, Kathryn Harrold, Bruno Kirby, George Kennedy, and James L. Brooks. Mint condition print courtesy of Sony Pictures.<br />MODERN ROMANCE may be Albert Brooks&rsquo;s least-known film, but arguably it&rsquo;s his greatest &ndash; the most uncompromising and consistent, and, as restrained as it is on the surface, ultimately the most personal and unforgiving in its self-criticism. Brooks is Robert Cole, a film editor who breaks up with his girlfriend only to spend the rest of the movie desperately trying to erase his mistake, and even more desperately trying to contain his jealousy, neediness, and paranoia. Still the great comic portrait of male neurosis, and of emotional and psychological dysfunction, MODERN ROMANCE lays bare its protagonist&rsquo;s insecurities with an honesty few dramatic films have achieved. Only Brooks could make a deadpan comedy about a man who&rsquo;s very nearly psychotic. Painfully funny, with the emphasis on &lsquo;funny&rsquo;.</p> Friday, February 13