Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Tue, 27 Sep 2016 06:26:35 -0400 NEW YORK WOMEN IN FILM & TELEVISION PRESENTS: THE OTHER F WORD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=09&year=2016#showing-46301 <p>NYWIFT&rsquo;s Member Screening Series provides members with the opportunity to show their work in a theatrical setting. The screenings are always followed by a Q&amp;A and networking at a nearby bar.<br /><br />NYWIFT programs, screenings, and events are supported, in part, by grants from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.<br /><br />Janet Stilson (Writer, Executive Producer) and Jennifer Wollan (Co-Producer)<br />THE BEAUTY OF DISASTER (2015, 13 min, digital)<br />A psychic swindle tests the love between Claire, an uptight marketing executive who has loopy visions that keep getting her into big trouble, and her sister Cleo, a not-so-gifted actress who pretends to be a fortuneteller. At its core, the film is about the beauty that can occur in moments of utter catastrophe.<br /><br />Caytha Jentis (Writer/Director/Executive Producer) and Susan Ades (Editor)<br />THE OTHER F WORD<br />(2016, 60 min, digital)<br />A character-driven comedic micro-series about four female friends in NYC who deal with the liberating and sobering experiences of mid-life. It&rsquo;s life after SEX AND THE CITY or GIRLS for grown-ups.</p> Tuesday, September 27 WOMAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA: NOBODY’S WIFE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=09&year=2016#showing-46268 <p>(LA MUJER DE NADIE)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the Filmoteca UNAM.<br /><br />&ldquo;Sequeyro (1901-92) started her career very early as a film journalist and an actress in silent films. She became the first woman director of Mexican sound cinema with NOBODY&rsquo;S WIFE. She was also the producer, screenwriter, editor, and beautiful star of this film set in the 19th century, a melodrama that tells the story of a young woman forced to leave home because her stepfather abuses her. She then receives protection from three bohemian men who give her shelter, fall madly in love with her, and believe her to be their muse. She secretly reciprocates the love of one of her admirers, but decides to leave their house in order not to disturb their brotherly harmony, heading toward a destiny that attests to the triumphant independence of the title. A year later Sequeyro directed her second and last film, DIABLILLOS DE ARRABAL (1938). She made both films with her own production company, but their commercial failure led her to abandon directing and return to being a respected film journalist.&rdquo; &ndash;Daniela Michel, &lsquo;The Female Gaze,&rsquo; SIGHT &amp; SOUND, Oct 2015</p> Tuesday, September 27 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=09&year=2016#showing-46299 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, September 28 WOMAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA: GOLDEN GATE GIRLS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=09&year=2016#showing-46265 <p>This documentary tells the story of filmmaker Esther Eng, the first woman to direct Chinese-language films in the U.S., and the most prominent woman director in Hong Kong in the 1930s. A San Francisco native and open lesbian, her contribution to film history is sadly overlooked, and her eleven feature films mostly lost. After the retirement of director Dorothy Arzner in 1943 and before Ida Lupino began directing in 1949, Eng was the only woman directing feature-length films in the U.S. Wei&rsquo;s documentary paints a fascinating picture of how Eng&rsquo;s career in filmmaking broke through gender and racial boundaries in Hollywood and Hong Kong, at a time when opportunities for Chinese women in the industry were few and far between. With a wealth of newly-discovered images and interviews with those who knew Eng, Wei uncovers a rich chapter of film history that challenges both gender hierarchies and national narratives.</p> Wednesday, September 28 WOMAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA: DEATH IS A CARESS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=09&year=2016#showing-46317 <p>(D&Oslash;DEN ER ET KJ&AElig;RTEGN)<br /><br />Print courtesy of the Norwegian Film Institute.<br /><br />&ldquo;DEATH IS A CARESS was the first Norwegian film directed by a woman, and the country&rsquo;s first film noir. It does not look like a noir: flooded with sunlight, the film breathes clean, healthy northern air, scented with pines and seashore brine. For a long time, the story does not follow any expected noir formula either. Erik, a handsome young auto mechanic (Claus Wiese), begins an affair with a wealthy married older woman, Sonja (Bj&oslash;rg Riiser-Larsen). But no murder plot or guilty flight follows; instead there is a matter-of-fact divorce and the lovers marry. Then, gradually, organically, their relationship starts to sour. They come from different worlds. He is callow, she is hysterical; they have fits of jealousy and sulks; their quarrels begin to turn violent. How a healthy, normal relationship that meets few obstacles ends in despair and blood is the dark thread of this unusual film: an everyday melodrama.&rdquo; &ndash;Imogen Sara Smith, &lsquo;The Female Gaze,&rsquo; SIGHT &amp; SOUND, Oct 2015</p> Wednesday, September 28 RE-VISIONS: EROTIC PSYCHE: BRADLEY EROS & ALINE MARE (WORKS: 1983-87) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=09&year=2016#showing-46224 <p>FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />In many ways an animating spirit and catalyzing agent of the NYC underground film scene from the 1980s to the present day, Bradley Eros&rsquo;s work encompasses filmmaking, expanded cinema performances, curating, writing, sound, and collage, among other more uncategorizable activities.<br /><br />Eros first became known as one half of Erotic Psyche, a filmmaking and performance collaboration with artist Aline Mare. Though associated with the Cinema of Transgression movement then emerging from the East Village, the films of Erotic Psyche are notably less pulp and more poetic than the work of other members of that scene, closer in affinity to the queer-feminist sensibility of Naked Eye Cinema. Later, in the late 80s and early 90s, Eros joined forces with filmmaker Jeanne Liotta; their films, released under the name Mediamystics, inhabit &ldquo;an area somewhere between cinema and ritual, finding alchemy in the chemistry of body and film&rdquo; (Owen O&rsquo;Toole, SPOOL).<br /><br />An unflagging champion of New York&rsquo;s experimental film culture (including as a longtime staff member at Anthology), Eros is active as a curator who, among his innumerable projects, co-programmed the Lower East Side microcinema, the Robert Beck Memorial Cinema. He also has served on the board of The Film-Makers&rsquo; Cooperative and, with Liotta, has conducted in-depth research on the films of Joseph Cornell. He exhibits with and is represented by Microscope Gallery, in Brooklyn.<br /><br />These two programs will feature brand-new preservations of the Erotic Psyche works, MUTABLE FIRE! and PYROTECHNICS, alongside additional Erotic Psyche and Mediamystics films, slide projections, and other relevant documents.<br /><br />&ldquo;Out of a fierce decade of exploration (approximately 1983-92), two intense collaborations emerged ~ at times tender, provocative, rapturous, subversive, and full of myth &amp; mystery.<br /><br />In late 1982 began the Quest of the Erotic Psyche (Aline Mare and Bradley Eros), signaling &lsquo;pleasure in resistance &amp; resistance in pleasure&rsquo; through an investigation of desire and its discontents. This partnership thrived, seeking some kind of transmedia metamorphosis among the detritus of New York&rsquo;s Lower East Side.<br /><br />In 1988, a bold third-mind erupted, irrepressibly concentrated as Mediamystics (Jeanne Liotta and Bradley Eros), initiated by the creation of myriad poetic works in film, video, slides, performance, sound &amp; text, all &lsquo;booby-trapped for revelations.&rsquo; They conspired to invent &lsquo;a techgnosis as resilient as love, as exquisite as transformation,&rsquo; evoking a natural philosophy in action.&rdquo; &ndash;Bradley Eros<br /><br />&ldquo;Erotic Psyche&rsquo;s richly layered tapestries of hallucinatory images are riddled with provocative rituals, from sex to science to surgery, that are guaranteed to produce frissions of pleasure.&rdquo; &ndash;Ann-Sargent Wooster, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />&ldquo;They fuse the dynamics of dream, blood, fire &amp; flesh!&rdquo; &ndash;WANGLUNG, Berlin<br /><br />&ldquo;Technologists of the flesh, they create hypnotic and voluptuous montages, reminiscent of Kenneth Anger&rsquo;s mystic incantations.&rdquo; &ndash;Manohla Dargis, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />VENUS TO PENIS (1983, 14 min, video)<br />MUTABLE FIRE! (1984, 7.5 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the National Film Preservation Foundation; special thanks to Bill Brand/BB Optics.)<br />PYROTECHNICS (1985, 10.5 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the National Film Preservation Foundation; special thanks to Bill Brand/BB Optics.)<br />CASSANDRA: SEETHING AT THE MOUTH (1985, 6 min, video)<br />HYST&Egrave;RY (1985, 11 min, Super 8mm-to-video. Soundtrack: Einst&uuml;rzende Neubauten &amp; Psychic TV.)<br />CREATURES OF MYTH-TAKEN IDENTITY IN THE LABORATORY OF HYST&Egrave;RY (1986, 6.5 min, video)<br />ELECTRAMORPHIC (1987, 14 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Thursday, September 29 RE-VISIONS: MEDIAMYSTICS: BRADLEY EROS & JEANNE LIOTTA (WORKS: 1988-92) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=09&year=2016#showing-46226 <p>FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />In many ways an animating spirit and catalyzing agent of the NYC underground film scene from the 1980s to the present day, Bradley Eros&rsquo;s work encompasses filmmaking, expanded cinema performances, curating, writing, sound, and collage, among other more uncategorizable activities.<br /><br />Eros first became known as one half of Erotic Psyche, a filmmaking and performance collaboration with artist Aline Mare. Though associated with the Cinema of Transgression movement then emerging from the East Village, the films of Erotic Psyche are notably less pulp and more poetic than the work of other members of that scene, closer in affinity to the queer-feminist sensibility of Naked Eye Cinema. Later, in the late 80s and early 90s, Eros joined forces with filmmaker Jeanne Liotta; their films, released under the name Mediamystics, inhabit &ldquo;an area somewhere between cinema and ritual, finding alchemy in the chemistry of body and film&rdquo; (Owen O&rsquo;Toole, SPOOL).<br /><br />An unflagging champion of New York&rsquo;s experimental film culture (including as a longtime staff member at Anthology), Eros is active as a curator who, among his innumerable projects, co-programmed the Lower East Side microcinema, the Robert Beck Memorial Cinema. He also has served on the board of The Film-Makers&rsquo; Cooperative and, with Liotta, has conducted in-depth research on the films of Joseph Cornell. He exhibits with and is represented by Microscope Gallery, in Brooklyn.<br /><br />These two programs will feature brand-new preservations of the Erotic Psyche works, MUTABLE FIRE! and PYROTECHNICS, alongside additional Erotic Psyche and Mediamystics films, slide projections, and other relevant documents.<br /><br />&ldquo;Out of a fierce decade of exploration (approximately 1983-92), two intense collaborations emerged ~ at times tender, provocative, rapturous, subversive, and full of myth &amp; mystery.<br /><br />In late 1982 began the Quest of the Erotic Psyche (Aline Mare and Bradley Eros), signaling &lsquo;pleasure in resistance &amp; resistance in pleasure&rsquo; through an investigation of desire and its discontents. This partnership thrived, seeking some kind of transmedia metamorphosis among the detritus of New York&rsquo;s Lower East Side.<br /><br />In 1988, a bold third-mind erupted, irrepressibly concentrated as Mediamystics (Jeanne Liotta and Bradley Eros), initiated by the creation of myriad poetic works in film, video, slides, performance, sound &amp; text, all &lsquo;booby-trapped for revelations.&rsquo; They conspired to invent &lsquo;a techgnosis as resilient as love, as exquisite as transformation,&rsquo; evoking a natural philosophy in action.&rdquo; &ndash;Bradley Eros<br /><br />Investigating living myths &amp; materials of the body and culture, collaborating on film and multi-media work.<br /><br />&ldquo;The films and performances of Eros &amp; Liotta are dark, mysterious, biomorphic, psychedelic and subterranean, while the poetic nature of their work is substantiated by equally haunting soundtracks.&rdquo; &ndash;FILM THREAT<br /><br />SOMA SEMA (1988, 13 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm)<br />OPEN SESAME (1989, 7 min, video)<br />fungus eroticus (1990, 30 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm)<br />DERVISH MACHINE (1992, 10 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm, b&amp;w/color)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.</p> Friday, September 30 EC: LAUREL & HARDY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46328 <p>&ldquo;Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy are the movies&rsquo; greatest comic duo, the quintessential dumb and dumber odd-couple. Though critically overshadowed by Chaplin, Keaton, and Lloyd, they were enormously popular, and proved a major influence on Abbott &amp; Costello, Lucille Ball &amp; Vivian Vance, and Jackie Gleason &amp; Art Carney, not to mention Samuel Beckett (they were an inspiration for WAITING FOR GODOT), Roman Polanski (who paid homage to them in his existentialist short films FAT AND LEAN and TWO MEN AND A WARDROBE), and Ken Jacobs (whose ONTIC ANTICS deconstructs one of their films).&rdquo; &ndash;David Mulkins<br /><br />THEM THAR HILLS (1934, 20 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. Directed by Charley Rogers.)<br />TIT FOR TAT (1935, 20 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. Directed by Charley Rogers.)<br />A CHUMP AT OXFORD (1940, 42 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. Directed by Alfred J. Goulding.)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.<br /><br /></p> Saturday, October 01 EC: LÉGER & MURPHY / CLAIR & PICABIA / MAN RAY & DUCHAMP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46329 <p>Fernand L&eacute;ger &amp; Dudley Murphy<br />BALLET M&Eacute;CANIQUE (1924, 19 min, 35mm, b&amp;w, silent. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br /><br />Ren&eacute; Clair &amp; Francis Picabia<br />ENTR&rsquo;ACTE (1924, 22 min, 35mm, b&amp;w)<br /><br />Man Ray<br />LE RETOUR &Agrave; LA RAISON (1923, 2 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br /><br />&Eacute;TOILE DE MER (1927, 13 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br /><br />EMAK BAKIA (1927, 18 min, 35mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br /><br />Marcel Duchamp &amp; Man Ray<br />ANEMIC CINEMA (1926, 7 min, 35mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Saturday, October 01 EC: CHRISTOPHER MACLAINE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46330 <p>&ldquo;The few facts that are known about Maclaine are, at best, sketchy. He was a published poet, a sort of down and out San Francisco bohemian who later became one of the psychic casualties of that scene. His last years were spent at Sunnyacres, a state mental hospital in Fairfield, California. These films, along with Ron Rice&rsquo;s, are clearly the most significant work to come out of the beat period.&rdquo; &ndash;J.J. Murphy<br /><br />All films preserved by Anthology Film Archives.<br /><br />THE MAN WHO INVENTED GOLD (1957, 14 min, 16mm)<br /><br />BEAT (1958, 6 min, 16mm)<br /><br />SCOTCH HOP (1959, 5.5 min, 16mm)<br /><br />THE END (1953, 35 min, 16mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.<br /><br />[<em><strong>THE MAN WHO INVENTED GOLD, BEAT, and SCOTCH HOP are not part of the Essential Cinema collection, but they are included here as a special bonus.</strong></em>]</p> Sunday, October 02 THE CHELSEA GIRLS - 50TH ANNIVERSARY SCREENING WITH JONAS MEKAS! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46417 <p>50TH ANNIVERSARY SCREENING &ndash; PRESENTED BY JONAS MEKAS!<br />Andy Warhol<br />THE CHELSEA GIRLS<br />1966, ca. 210 min, 16mm double-projection. With Nico, Ondine, Marie Menken, Mary Woronov, Gerard Malanga, International Velvet, Ingrid Superstar, Mario Montez, Eric Emerson, and Brigid Berlin. Special thanks to Kitty Cleary (MoMA).<br /><br />Warhol&rsquo;s double-screen masterpiece &ndash; consisting of 12 unedited reels, shown side-by-side, with only one soundtrack audible at a time &ndash; depicts the Chelsea Hotel as a teeming hive of Superstars, junkies, prostitutes, and generally out-sized personalities. An underground sensation upon its release, it ultimately broke out of the underground cinema circuit, invading a &lsquo;respectable&rsquo; uptown theater and leading uptight NEW YORK TIMES critic Bosley Crowther to declare, &ldquo;now that [the] underground has surfaced on West 57th Street and taken over a theater with carpets&hellip;it is time for permissive adults to stop winking at their too-precious pranks&hellip;.&rdquo;<br /><br />Before having the gall to blow uptown minds, however, THE CHELSEA GIRLS premiered in 1966 at Jonas Mekas&rsquo;s Film-Makers&rsquo; Cinematheque at 125 West 41st Street (apparently far enough downtown for Crowther), where it sold out many of its initial screenings and enjoyed several return engagements, before moving to the Cinema Rendezvous on 57th. To celebrate its 50th anniversary, we present this special screening (safely downtown), hosted by Jonas Mekas himself, who will share stories of how THE CHELSEA GIRLS was let loose on the world.<br /><br /></p> Sunday, October 02 FLAHERTY NYC: WILD SOUNDS, PROGRAM 1: VOICES FROM BEYOND http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46368 <p><em><strong>Carolyn Lazard, Sara Magenheimer, Courtney Stephens, and Aura Satz in person.</strong></em><br /><br />Technology often &ldquo;speaks&rdquo; in the voices of women, from virtual assistants like Siri and Alexa to the affectless tones of automated phone services. The various technological devices in this program, in turn, reshape what a woman&rsquo;s voice sounds like, from the Ruben&rsquo;s tube that visualizes sound in Aura Satz&rsquo;s IN AND OUT OF SYNC, to the hypnotically looped 16mm optical track in Gunvor Nelson&rsquo;s MY NAME IS OONA, and the text-to-speech computer applications in Sara Magenheimer&rsquo;s SEVEN SIGNS THAT MEAN SILENCE. In Martine Syms&rsquo;s A PILOT FOR A SHOW ABOUT NOWHERE, Courtney Stephens&rsquo;s IDA WESTERN EXILE, and Carolyn Lazard&rsquo;s GET WELL SOON, the voices of technology and mass media alternately torment, inspire, and indelibly shape the lives of the filmmakers.<br /><br />Aura Satz IN AND OUT OF SYNC (2012, 20 min, 16mm)<br />Martine Syms A PILOT FOR A SHOW ABOUT NOWHERE (2015, 24 min, digital)<br />Courtney Stephens IDA WESTERN EXILE (2014, 7 min, digital)<br />Sara Magenheimer SEVEN SIGNS THAT MEAN SILENCE (2013, 11 min, digital)<br />Carolyn Lazard GET WELL SOON (2015, 13.5 min, digital)<br />Gunvor Nelson MY NAME IS OONA (1969, 13 min, 16mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.<br /><br /></p> Monday, October 03 EC: GEORGE LANDOW, AKA OWEN LAND http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46326 <p>&ldquo;His remarkable faculty is as maker of images.... [T]he images he photographs are among the most radical, super-real and haunting images the cinema has ever given us.&rdquo; &ndash;P. Adams Sitney, VISIONARY FILM<br /><br />FILM IN WHICH..., INSTITUTIONAL QUALITY, and FILM OF THEIR 1973 SPRING TOUR have been preserved by Anthology Film Archives through the National Film Preservation Foundation's Avant-Garde Masters Grant program and The Film Foundation. Funding provided by the George Lucas Family Foundation.<br /><br />FLEMING FALOON (1963, 6 min, 16mm)<br /><br />FILM IN WHICH THERE APPEAR SPROCKET HOLES, EDGE LETTERING, DIRT PARTICLES, ETC. (1965/66, 5 min, 16mm, silent)<br /><br />DIPLOTERATOLOGY (1967/78, 7 min, 16mm, silent)<br />A revised edit and re-ordering of material from Landow's earlier film, BARDO FOLLIES.<br /><br />THE FILM THAT RISES TO THE SURFACE OF CLARIFIED BUTTER (1968, 9 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br /><br />INSTITUTIONAL QUALITY (1969, 5 min, 16mm)<br /><br />REMEDIAL READING COMPREHENSION (1970, 5 min, 16mm)<br /><br />WHAT&rsquo;S WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE? 1 (1971, 4 min, 16mm)<br /><br />WHAT'S WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE? 2 (1972, 7 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br /><br />THANK YOU JESUS FOR THE ETERNAL PRESENT (1973, 6 min, 16mm)<br /><br />A FILM OF THEIR 1973 SPRING TOUR COMMISSIONED BY CHRISTIAN WORLD LIBERATION FRONT OF BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA (1974, 11.5 min, 16mm)<br />This film was originally listed or subtitled as THANK YOU JESUS FOR THE ETERNAL PRESENT &ndash; 2.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 70 min.</p> Monday, October 03 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46423 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, October 05 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46334 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong><br /><br /></p> Thursday, October 06 GERALD O'GRADY'S 'FILM-MAKERS', PROG. 1: JONAS MEKAS / STAN BRAKHAGE / PETER KUBELKA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46394 <p>PROGRAM 1: JONAS MEKAS / STAN BRAKHAGE / PETER KUBELKA<br />Total running time: ca. 90 min.<br /><br />&ldquo;Developed and directed by Gerald O&rsquo;Grady &ndash; scholar and founder of the legendary Center for Media Study at SUNY Buffalo in the early 1970s &ndash; the series, FILM-MAKERS, was broadcast on American public television channels from 1976-77 and geared to the independent and experimental film world. It helped to promote marginal artistic practices that were generally misunderstood by the public at large. O&rsquo;Grady would talk with his guests, filmmakers and artists such as Stan Vanderbeek, Peter Kubelka, Paul Sharits, Robert Breer, and Jonas Mekas. [Today] FILM-MAKERS constitutes invaluable archival material for the history of independent and experimental cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;CIN&Eacute;MA DU R&Eacute;EL<br /><br />&ldquo;In l975, the regional media center, Media Study/Buffalo, which I had founded in 1973, entered into a cooperative project with our local public broadcasting station, WNED-Channel 17, to produce thirteen 30-minute segments of a program called FILM-MAKERS. At that time, no public television station was screening the films of what had become known as underground, experimental, art, independent, or personal cinema. The attempt was to explain to the widest possible audience how these new media worked. Channel 17 provided its audio equipment and cameras, the three cameramen, the Producer, the Director, and a Sound Recordist. The programs were unrehearsed and the filmmakers received $300 each for the rights to show their work. Within the next three years, the series was aired by more than 100 other public television stations in the U.S. Despite the relatively low ratings, these broadcasts reached an audience more than 100 times larger than that for all previous screenings of these works in regional centers, classrooms, museums, etc.&rdquo; &ndash;Gerald O&rsquo;Grady<br /><br />Special thanks to Gerald O&rsquo;Grady, and to Dr. Dorcas M&uuml;ller (ZKM, Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe).<br /><br /><em><strong>Gerald O&rsquo;Grady will be here in person to present each program!</strong></em><br /><br /></p> Thursday, October 06 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46342 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong></p> Thursday, October 06 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46343 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong></p> Friday, October 07 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46335 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong><br /><br /></p> Friday, October 07 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46336 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong><br /><br /></p> Saturday, October 08 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46344 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong></p> Saturday, October 08 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46337 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong><br /><br /></p> Sunday, October 09 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46345 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong></p> Sunday, October 09 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46338 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong><br /><br /></p> Monday, October 10 GERALD O'GRADY'S 'FILM-MAKERS', PROG. 2: ROBERT BREER / HILARY HARRIS / PAUL SHARITS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46393 <p>PROGRAM 2: ROBERT BREER / HILARY HARRIS / PAUL SHARITS<br />Total running time: ca. 90 min.<br /><br />&ldquo;Developed and directed by Gerald O&rsquo;Grady &ndash; scholar and founder of the legendary Center for Media Study at SUNY Buffalo in the early 1970s &ndash; the series, FILM-MAKERS, was broadcast on American public television channels from 1976-77 and geared to the independent and experimental film world. It helped to promote marginal artistic practices that were generally misunderstood by the public at large. O&rsquo;Grady would talk with his guests, filmmakers and artists such as Stan Vanderbeek, Peter Kubelka, Paul Sharits, Robert Breer, and Jonas Mekas. [Today] FILM-MAKERS constitutes invaluable archival material for the history of independent and experimental cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;CIN&Eacute;MA DU R&Eacute;EL<br /><br />&ldquo;In l975, the regional media center, Media Study/Buffalo, which I had founded in 1973, entered into a cooperative project with our local public broadcasting station, WNED-Channel 17, to produce thirteen 30-minute segments of a program called FILM-MAKERS. At that time, no public television station was screening the films of what had become known as underground, experimental, art, independent, or personal cinema. The attempt was to explain to the widest possible audience how these new media worked. Channel 17 provided its audio equipment and cameras, the three cameramen, the Producer, the Director, and a Sound Recordist. The programs were unrehearsed and the filmmakers received $300 each for the rights to show their work. Within the next three years, the series was aired by more than 100 other public television stations in the U.S. Despite the relatively low ratings, these broadcasts reached an audience more than 100 times larger than that for all previous screenings of these works in regional centers, classrooms, museums, etc.&rdquo; &ndash;Gerald O&rsquo;Grady<br /><br />Special thanks to Gerald O&rsquo;Grady, and to Dr. Dorcas M&uuml;ller (ZKM, Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe).<br /><br /><em><strong>Gerald O&rsquo;Grady will be here in person to present each program!</strong></em><br /><br /></p> Monday, October 10 HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO - Part 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46346 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Distributed by Kino Lorber. Special thanks to Graham Swon (Kino Lorber), and to Mathieu Fournet and Amelie Garin-Davet (Cultural Services of the French Embassy).<br /><br />In February 2002 &ndash; about a year before the U.S. invasion &ndash; Iraqi filmmaker Abbas Fahdel traveled home from France to capture everyday life as his country prepared for war. He concentrated on family and friends, including his 12-year-old nephew, Haider, as they went about their daily lives, which had come to include planning for shortages of food, water, and power. No strangers to war, the Iraqis thought they understood what was coming, and could even manage to be grimly humorous about what they felt would likely be a major and lengthy inconvenience. And then, the war began.<br /><br />When Fahdel resumed filming in 2003, two weeks after the invasion, daily activities have come to a near standstill, the city is overrun with foreign soldiers, and many areas of Baghdad have been closed off to ordinary citizens. Iraqis endure, seemingly as unwitting as Americans themselves about what further tragedy awaits. Among the most essential documents in recent cinema, Fahdel&rsquo;s epic yet intimate film paints a compelling portrait of people struggling to survive while their civilization, dating back to ancient times, is destroyed around them. This is a pinnacle of documentary filmmaking in the 21st century, and truly a work that should be seen by any and every concerned American citizen.<br /><br />&ldquo;What would you do if the world&rsquo;s most fearsome military presence threatened to invade where you live? How does one even begin to prepare for that kind of assault? In HOMELAND, Fahdel offers world audiences an extraordinary opportunity to identify with the &lsquo;enemy&rsquo; in the Iraq War &ndash; conveniently faceless in most Western coverage, but humanized here by members of Fahdel&rsquo;s own family. &hellip;[T]his transformative verite glimpse into the lives of everyday Iraqis demands both patience and empathy, but the reward is worth every second.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Debruge, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;The most significant work of art to come out of the Iraq war.&rdquo; &ndash;Jeffrey Ruoff, HUFFINGTON POST<br /><br />&ldquo;A mesmerizing and deeply moving portrayal of the Iraq War as seen by Iraqis, Fahdel&rsquo;s six-hour masterpiece is essential viewing for anyone hoping to understand the devastating implications of the U.S.-led invasion.&rdquo; &ndash;FRANCE24<br /><br />&ldquo;HOMELAND represents a window into a world we would never be able to see through our own lenses. The film capsizes our preconceptions, both benevolent and prejudiced, to illustrate first and foremost that the daily reality of war is something that media, regardless of their political orientation, hardly touch upon. While journalism manipulates facts in its professional duty to craft a version of reality and toe an editorial line, Fahdel&rsquo;s film immerses the spectator into the flux of everyday uncertainty. If stereotypes deny subtleties in order to corroborate fears, HOMELAND attempts to mirror the complexity of Iraqi society by capturing its nuances, be they political, cultural or religious.&rdquo; &ndash;Celluloid Liberation Front, MUBI<br /><br />HOMELAND: IRAQ YEAR ZERO will be shown in two parts, which can be seen together or on separate days for the price of a single admission.<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Abbas Fahdel will be here in person on opening day, Thursday, October 6!</em></strong></p> Monday, October 10 GERALD O'GRADY'S 'FILM-MAKERS', PROG. 3: STAN VANDERBEEK / ED EMSHWILLER / GUNVOR NELSON http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2016#showing-46396 <p>PROGRAM 3: STAN VANDERBEEK / ED EMSHWILLER / GUNVOR NELSON<br />Total running time: ca. 90 min.<br /><br />&ldquo;Developed and directed by Gerald O&rsquo;Grady &ndash; scholar and founder of the legendary Center for Media Study at SUNY Buffalo in the early 1970s &ndash; the series, FILM-MAKERS, was broadcast on American public television channels from 1976-77 and geared to the independent and experimental film world. It helped to promote marginal artistic practices that were generally misunderstood by the public at large. O&rsquo;Grady would talk with his guests, filmmakers and artists such as Stan Vanderbeek, Peter Kubelka, Paul Sharits, Robert Breer, and Jonas Mekas. [Today] FILM-MAKERS constitutes invaluable archival material for the history of independent and experimental cinema.&rdquo; &ndash;CIN&Eacute;MA DU R&Eacute;EL<br /><br />&ldquo;In l975, the regional media center, Media Study/Buffalo, which I had founded in 1973, entered into a cooperative project with our local public broadcasting station, WNED-Channel 17, to produce thirteen 30-minute segments of a program called FILM-MAKERS. At that time, no public television station was screening the films of what had become known as underground, experimental, art, independent, or personal cinema. The attempt was to explain to the widest possible audience how these new media worked. Channel 17 provided its audio equipment and cameras, the three cameramen, the Producer, the Director, and a Sound Recordist. The programs were unrehearsed and the filmmakers received $300 each for the rights to show their work. Within the next three years, the series was aired by more than 100 other public television stations in the U.S. Despite the relatively low ratings, these broadcasts reached an audience more than 100 times larger than that for all previous screenings of these works in regional centers, classrooms, museums, etc.&rdquo; &ndash;Gerald O&rsquo;Grady<br /><br />Special thanks to Gerald O&rsquo;Grady, and to Dr. Dorcas M&uuml;ller (ZKM, Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe).<br /><br /><em><strong>Gerald O&rsquo;Grady will be here in person to present each program!</strong></em></p> Monday, October 10