Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Mon, 19 Feb 2018 06:37:52 -0500 INDIA: MATRI BHUMI + INTERVIEW WITH SALVADOR ALLENDE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48636 <p>INDIA: MATRI BHUMI<br />(1959, 95 min, 35mm, b&amp;w. In Italian with English subtitles. Archival print courtesy of Istituto Luce Cinecitt&agrave;.)<br />&ldquo;A sublime symbiosis of fable and nonfiction, INDIA: MATRI BHUMI simply and poetically interrelates humans and animals, city and village, and society and nature over four separate stories. This visionary work is especially striking in the way its objective and subjective narrators merge into one another, reflecting not only the idea of reincarnation, but also the greater unity to which all of them belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Jonathan Rosenbaum, CHICAGO READER<br />&amp;<br />INTERVIEW WITH SALVADOR ALLENDE / INTERVISTA CON SALVADOR ALLENDE: LA FORZA E LA RAGIONE<br />(1971, 36 min, 35mm, b&amp;w. Directed in collaboration with Emidio Greco. In Italian with English subtitles. Archival print courtesy of Istituto Luce Cinecitt&agrave;.)<br />Though recorded in 1971, this conversation between Rossellini and Chilean President Salvador Allende first aired on the Italian national network RAI 3 on September 15, 1973, just four days after his death during the right wing coup that ousted him.</p> Monday, February 19 ANTONIO GAUDÍ http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48648 <p>Catalan architect Antonio Gaud&iacute; (1852-1926) designed some of the world&rsquo;s most astonishing buildings, interiors, and parks; Japanese director Hiroshi Teshigahara constructed some of the most aesthetically audacious films ever made. Here their artistry melds in a unique, enthralling cinematic experience. Less a documentary than a visual poem, Teshigahara&rsquo;s ANTONIO GAUD&Iacute; takes viewers on a tour of Gaud&iacute;&rsquo;s truly spectacular architecture, including his massive, still-unfinished masterpiece, the Sagrada Familia cathedral in Barcelona. With camera work as bold and sensual as the curves of his subject&rsquo;s organic structures, Teshigahara immortalizes Gaud&iacute; on film.</p> Monday, February 19 GOD’S COUNTRY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48660 <p>Louis Malle&rsquo;s affair with the documentary genre spans two and a half decades, from 1962-87. His subjects were likewise far-reaching, ranging from the Tour de France in Paris, to the depths of the Mediterranean Sea, to the frenetic streets of Calcutta. In 1979, Malle was sent to the heart of Middle America, to Glencoe, Minnesota, on a PBS-sponsored project. There he made the acquaintance of several proud denizens of a then-prosperous farming community, and filmed their daily rituals and serendipitous moments with an equally genial curiosity. Six years later, Malle returned to the town of his own volition, only to find spirits dampened by the effects of the Reagan-era recession. The film that resulted, GOD&rsquo;S COUNTRY, is a historical yet timeless memento of the American Midwest.</p> Tuesday, February 20 THEATER IN TRANCE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48644 <p>Fassbinder&rsquo;s only documentary film is this record of the Cologne theater festival, Theater of the World 1981. The program encompassed more than 30 groups from 15 countries and more than 100 performances. For two weeks, Fassbinder observed the participants in the festival and filmed their acts, eventually winnowing the selection and marrying the imagery to his own spoken recitation of texts by Antonin Artaud. A fascinating chronicle of the theatrical culture of the era, as well as an illustration of an unfamiliar dimension of Fassbinder&rsquo;s art, it features appearances from Squat Theatre (which originated in Hungary but were ultimately headquartered in a storefront space on Manhattan&rsquo;s West 23<sup>rd</sup> Street), the Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch, and the Kipper Kids, among other groups.</p> Tuesday, February 20 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48677 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, February 21 EC: KINO-EYE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48667 <p>(KINOGLAZ)<br /><br />&ldquo;What do Jean-Luc Godard, Jean Rouch, Peter Kubelka, Stan Brakhage, Allen Funt, and Santiago Alvarez have in common? All of them were anticipated, if not directly influenced, by the genius of Dziga Vertov, one of the half-dozen most important personalities in the history of cinema, and a key figure in 20th century culture as a whole.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE<br /><br />&ldquo;KINOGLAZ is a didactic work, centered on episodes which articulate major preoccupations of the young Soviet regime: it deals with the manufacture and distribution of bread,&hellip;the processing and distribution of meat, celebrates the constructions of youth camps and discusses the problem of alcoholism. It introduces Vertov&rsquo;s formal adoption of the articulation of filmmaking technique as his subject. It begins, as well, to suggest what we may understand by &lsquo;the negative of time&rsquo; as a key &lsquo;to the Communist decoding of reality.&rsquo; Looking for &lsquo;the negative of time,&rsquo; we find it in the use of reverse motion as analytic strategy.&rdquo; &ndash;Annette Michelson, &ldquo;From Magician to Epistemologist&rdquo;</p> Wednesday, February 21 SWISS INSTITUTE PRESENTS: PROGRAM 2: DONNA HARAWAY: STORYTELLING FOR EARTHLY SURVIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48574 <p>NYC PREMIERE!<br /><br />Donna Haraway &amp; Fabrizio Terranova<br />DONNA HARAWAY: STORYTELLING FOR EARTHLY SURVIVAL<br />(2016, 82 min, digital)<br />This film portrays the groundbreaking thinker Donna Haraway&rsquo;s pioneering work in science, technology, gender, and trans-species relationships over the last four decades, all of it marked by her deep commitments to feminism and environmentalism. Refusing to distinguish between humans and animals and machines, she proposes new ways of understanding our world that challenge normative structures and boundaries. Her approach to writing is equally distinct, breaking with prevailing trends in theory by embracing narrative techniques in painting a rebellious and hopeful future. Recognizing her singular talent for storytelling, Terranova spent a few weeks filming Haraway and her dog Cayenne in their California home, exploring their personal universe as well as the development of Haraway&rsquo;s views on kinship and planetary welfare. For the NYC premiere of the film, Donna Haraway will give a video introduction, and Fabrizio Terranova will present a collection of YouTube clips that he and Haraway have selected.</p> Thursday, February 22 EC: FORWARD, SOVIET! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48669 <p>(SHAGHAI, SOVIET!)<br /><br />&ldquo;FORWARD, SOVIET! was commissioned by the Moscow soviet for the 1926 elections. Structurally, the film compares prerevolutionary famine and disease with the dynamism of revolutionary life. Then after a sequence on newborn babies, Vertov&rsquo;s irrepressible futurism bursts forth. Buses and cars hold a political rally without the benefit of their drivers; an extended montage celebrates industrial forms with such gusto as to make L&eacute;ger&rsquo;s contemporaneous BALLET M&Eacute;CANIQUE seem virtually Luddite.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE</p> Thursday, February 22 STARLESS DREAMS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48577 <p>(ROYAHAYE DAME SOBH)<br /><br />&ldquo;The world needs to see this spare, revelatory film and hear these girls&rsquo; pained and sometimes proud confessions. They divulge their crimes, including assaults and murders. They speak of meth addiction and relentless abuse; they ask at group meetings why punishments in Iran are so much harsher for women who commit crimes than for men; they speak of family members in jail or awaiting the death penalty. One girl reports that her father, a robber and mugger, is now facing death after having been caught with meth in jail. &lsquo;I&rsquo;m not as tough as I sound,&rsquo; one admits, her face slight and girlish beneath her black headscarf. She just had to learn to be tough to survive on her own on the streets. In the detention center, addressing the camera, she at last faces someone interested in who she really is, in who she could be. The film follows none of these girls beyond those walls, leaving us to worry over them. When they&rsquo;re released, who will they have to be?&rdquo; &ndash;Alan Scherstuhl, THE VILLAGE VOICE</p> Friday, February 23 EC: A SIXTH OF THE WORLD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48670 <p>(SHESTAIA CHAST MIRA)<br /><br />&ldquo;[A SIXTH OF THE WORLD] was commissioned by the government trade agency, Gostorg. Vertov called [it] a &lsquo;lyrical cine-poem,&rsquo; and he used declamatory titles to address the audience in the manner of Mayakovsky or Whitman. Dramatizing the full expanse of the Soviet Union (as well as demonstrating Vertov&rsquo;s fast cutting), A SIXTH OF THE WORLD proved his first popular success and attracted considerable attention abroad.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE</p> Friday, February 23 THE OTHER SIDE OF BURKA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48580 <p>(AZ PASE BORGHE)<br /><br />Set in a tight-knit, extremely conservative island community off the Southern coast of Iran where all women wear burkas, this film begins as an investigation into the suicide of a woman named Samireh. Her husband callously says that while he cares about the lives of his kids, women&rsquo;s lives are cheap. However, the women Oskouei interviews &ndash; many of whom were married off at age 12 or 13 &ndash; stand up for themselves and discuss their difficult existences. Oskouei relies mostly on close-up or medium-shot interviews, and as usual, displays his gift for framing people dynamically in tight spaces.<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />MY MOTHER&rsquo;S HOME, LAGOON / KHYANEYE MADARIYAM MORDAB<br />(2000, 29 min, digital. In Farsi with English subtitles.)<br />A 67-year-old woman takes care of her 100-year-old mother, who is a complete invalid and talks compulsively about how she expects (and wishes) to die at any minute. But in order to make a living, the daughter, Kobra, goes out every day and works as a fisherwoman. Oskouei depicts the lagoon with a certain amount of lyricism, while simultaneously revealing the backbreaking nature of fishing.</p> Friday, February 23 EC: THE ELEVENTH YEAR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48671 <p>(ODINNADTSAYI)<br /><br />&ldquo;Vertov&rsquo;s ecstatic paean to industrial development was, like Eisenstein&rsquo;s OCTOBER, commissioned to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Bolshevik revolution and was accused of the dread &lsquo;formalism.&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE</p> Saturday, February 24 NOSE, IRANIAN STYLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48583 <p>(DAMAGH BE SABKE IRANI)<br /><br />Starting out by contrasting brutal footage of the Iran-Iraq War with the posh ski resort now standing where many of its battles took place, NOSE, IRANIAN STYLE documents a generation in search of an identity, and often resorting to plastic surgery as a means to express itself. Per capita, Iran is the plastic surgery capital of the world. Oskouei talks to members of the film industry, intellectuals, and ordinary people who are planning to get nose jobs for various reasons. Rather than simply condemning the prevalence of plastic surgery &ndash; although it&rsquo;s clear that the director is alarmed by the phenomenon &ndash; Oskouei suggests that it reflects a void created by an empty pop culture, rigid religious dictates, and a lack of real options for Iranian youth. He focuses on both men and women who have gone under the knife, or wish to do so. In NOSE, IRANIAN STYLE, Oskouei depicts people who are far more privileged than the subjects of his trilogy about teenagers and prison, but whose lives seem just as troubled beneath the surface.<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />MARYAM OF HENGAM ISLAND / MARYAM JAZIREHYE HENGAM<br />(2005, 26 min, digital. In Farsi with English subtitles.)</p> Saturday, February 24 EC: MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48672 <p>(CHELOVEK S KINO-APPARATOM)<br /><br />&ldquo;If Vertov had never made anything other than MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA he would still be among the cinema&rsquo;s greatest masters. A kaleidoscopic city symphony &ndash; conjoining Moscow, Kiev, and Odessa in one dizzying metropolis &ndash; this is Vertov&rsquo;s most complex film, matching the rhythms of a day to the cycle of life (birth, death, marriage, divorce) and the mechanisms of movie-making to the logic of production. Made without titles, the movie is at once a documentary portrait of the Soviet people, a reflexive essay on cinematic representation (as dazzling as it is didactic), and an ode to work itself as a process of transformation.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE</p> Saturday, February 24 IT’S ALWAYS LATE FOR FREEDOM + THE LAST DAYS OF WINTER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48586 <p>IT&rsquo;S ALWAYS LATE FOR FREEDOM / HAMISHE BARAYE AZADI DIR AST<br />(2007, 52 min, digital. In Farsi with English subtitles.)<br />IT&rsquo;S ALWAYS LATE FOR FREEDOM is the first film in Oskouei&rsquo;s trilogy about teenagers and prison. As always, Oskouei excels at developing a rare level of trust with his subjects, who seem completely natural as they discuss profoundly difficult subjects. The film includes images of 12-year-old boys writhing in agony as they suffer through crack withdrawal. Less concerned with the root social causes of his subjects&rsquo; social problems than in the subsequent two films in the trilogy, Oskouei here carefully avoids demonizing prison or the people who work there. His ability to frame teenagers in revealing ways is striking, particularly given the limited space with which he had to work.<br />&amp;<br />THE LAST DAYS OF WINTER / AKHARIN ROUZHAYE ZEMESTAN<br />(2011, 52 min, digital. In Farsi with English subtitles.)<br />The second part of Oskouei&rsquo;s trilogy, THE LAST DAYS OF WINTER depicts a group of shockingly young boys, all apparently drug addicts who wound up in trouble for stealing to support their habits. The film includes elements of cinema v&eacute;rit&eacute;, but the camerawork is closer to neo-realism, and Oskouei calls frequent attention to his own presence: although he never appears on-camera, his voice is heard throughout. He manages to achieve a rare degree of intimacy with his subjects, as they talk to the camera about deeply personal ideas, and when he goes outside with them, he has a knack for picking just the right locations in which to film them.</p> Saturday, February 24 EC: ENTHUSIASM, OR SYMPHONY OF THE DON BASIN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48673 <p>(ENTUZIASM: SIMFONIYA DONBASSA)<br /><br />ENTHUSIASM is Vertov&rsquo;s vision of the transformation of social energies in a progressive society. The film is remarkable for its experimental use of sound and montage. Vertov himself invented special lightweight recording equipment to register the sounds of workers in the mines and factories of the Don Basin in this film. It is the best example of his theory of cinema which brings together &ldquo;the film-eye and the radio-ear.&rdquo; At one point he described the film as a &ldquo;symphony of noises.&rdquo;<br /><br />&ldquo;I would never have believed it possible to assemble mechanical noises to create such beauty. One of the most superb symphonies I have known. Dziga Vertov is a musician.&rdquo; &ndash;Charles Chaplin</p> Sunday, February 25 MEHRDAD OSKOUEI: SHORT FILM PROGRAM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48589 <p>THE ECLIPSE / ROZHGIRAN (2001, 14 min, video. Co-directed by Ebrahim Saeedi.)<br />THE WIDOWER / BIVEH MARD (2002, 19 min, digital)<br />I CAN&rsquo;T REMEMBER ANYTHING ABOUT AFGHANISTAN! / ROO BE JAEI DOOR (2002, 18 min, digital)<br />Total running time: ca. 55 min.</p> Sunday, February 25 EC: THREE SONGS ABOUT LENIN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48674 <p>(TRI PESNI O LENINYE)<br /><br />&ldquo;Vertov&rsquo;s &lsquo;official&rsquo; Soviet masterpiece &ndash; a hagiographic compilation of lyrically edited stock footage and cinema&rsquo;s first direct interviews &ndash; was the most successful (and compromised) movie he ever made.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE</p> Sunday, February 25 NOSE, IRANIAN STYLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48584 <p>(DAMAGH BE SABKE IRANI)<br /><br />Starting out by contrasting brutal footage of the Iran-Iraq War with the posh ski resort now standing where many of its battles took place, NOSE, IRANIAN STYLE documents a generation in search of an identity, and often resorting to plastic surgery as a means to express itself. Per capita, Iran is the plastic surgery capital of the world. Oskouei talks to members of the film industry, intellectuals, and ordinary people who are planning to get nose jobs for various reasons. Rather than simply condemning the prevalence of plastic surgery &ndash; although it&rsquo;s clear that the director is alarmed by the phenomenon &ndash; Oskouei suggests that it reflects a void created by an empty pop culture, rigid religious dictates, and a lack of real options for Iranian youth. He focuses on both men and women who have gone under the knife, or wish to do so. In NOSE, IRANIAN STYLE, Oskouei depicts people who are far more privileged than the subjects of his trilogy about teenagers and prison, but whose lives seem just as troubled beneath the surface.<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />MARYAM OF HENGAM ISLAND / MARYAM JAZIREHYE HENGAM<br />(2005, 26 min, digital. In Farsi with English subtitles.)</p> Sunday, February 25 THE OTHER SIDE OF BURKA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48581 <p>(AZ PASE BORGHE)<br /><br />Set in a tight-knit, extremely conservative island community off the Southern coast of Iran where all women wear burkas, this film begins as an investigation into the suicide of a woman named Samireh. Her husband callously says that while he cares about the lives of his kids, women&rsquo;s lives are cheap. However, the women Oskouei interviews &ndash; many of whom were married off at age 12 or 13 &ndash; stand up for themselves and discuss their difficult existences. Oskouei relies mostly on close-up or medium-shot interviews, and as usual, displays his gift for framing people dynamically in tight spaces.<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />MY MOTHER&rsquo;S HOME, LAGOON / KHYANEYE MADARIYAM MORDAB<br />(2000, 29 min, digital. In Farsi with English subtitles.)<br />A 67-year-old woman takes care of her 100-year-old mother, who is a complete invalid and talks compulsively about how she expects (and wishes) to die at any minute. But in order to make a living, the daughter, Kobra, goes out every day and works as a fisherwoman. Oskouei depicts the lagoon with a certain amount of lyricism, while simultaneously revealing the backbreaking nature of fishing.</p> Monday, February 26 THE ROMANTIC BARBER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48566 <p>(EL PELUQUERO ROM&Aacute;NTICO)<br /><br />NYC PREMIERE!<br /><br />Neighborhood barber Victor&rsquo;s life is rather uneventful. He sticks to a strict daily routine at both work and home, where he spends his nights alongside his mother listening to boleros or watching movies from the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema on TV. His routine is disrupted when his mother suddenly dies. His flirtation with a young waitress and his reunion with an old girlfriend can&rsquo;t fill the void left behind by his mother. That changes, however, when a man claiming to be his father suddenly walks into the shop one day. The encounter will lead him to an unexpected and life-changing trip to Rio de Janeiro. The fifth feature by Mexican director Iv&aacute;n &Aacute;vila Due&ntilde;as, THE ROMANTIC BARBER is a quirky and charming film about an anachronistic character in a vanishing environment.</p> Monday, February 26 STARLESS DREAMS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48578 <p>(ROYAHAYE DAME SOBH)<br /><br />&ldquo;The world needs to see this spare, revelatory film and hear these girls&rsquo; pained and sometimes proud confessions. They divulge their crimes, including assaults and murders. They speak of meth addiction and relentless abuse; they ask at group meetings why punishments in Iran are so much harsher for women who commit crimes than for men; they speak of family members in jail or awaiting the death penalty. One girl reports that her father, a robber and mugger, is now facing death after having been caught with meth in jail. &lsquo;I&rsquo;m not as tough as I sound,&rsquo; one admits, her face slight and girlish beneath her black headscarf. She just had to learn to be tough to survive on her own on the streets. In the detention center, addressing the camera, she at last faces someone interested in who she really is, in who she could be. The film follows none of these girls beyond those walls, leaving us to worry over them. When they&rsquo;re released, who will they have to be?&rdquo; &ndash;Alan Scherstuhl, THE VILLAGE VOICE</p> Monday, February 26 FLAHERTY NYC: PROGRAM 4: FREE JAZZ WITH BODIES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48562 <p><strong>Nadia Granados and Amber Bemak in person.<br /><br /></strong>Rather than focusing on collaboration behind the camera, this screening looks at the ways that literal bodies become incorporated within the field of vision, often in conjunction with movement, sound, landscape, and politics. Alice Anne Parker facilitates a continuous dissolve between 87 nude bodies, whereas Luca Maria Patella&rsquo;s TERRA ANIMATA animates figures within an abstracted landscape. BORDERHOLE expresses the political and spatial implications of an imaginary border between Colombia and the United States through movement and news footage. KwieKulik&rsquo;s experiment on Morel&rsquo;s Hill shows two groups working out a philosophical argument strictly by means of visual communication.<br /><br />Alice Anne Parker RIVERBODY (U.S., 1970, 6 min, 16mm)<br />KwieKulik ACTIVITIES (Poland, 1972, 12 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />Luca Maria Patella TERRA ANIMATA (Italy, 1967, 7 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br />Nadia Granados &amp; Amber Bemak BORDERHOLE (Mexico, 2017, 14 min, digital)<br />Luca Maria Patella SKMP2 (Italy, 1968, 30 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br />KwieKulik GAME ON MOREL&rsquo;S HILL (GROUP ACTION) (Poland, 1971/2006, 15 min, digital)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 90 min.</p> Tuesday, February 27 NYWIFT: PROGRAM 2: THAT WAY MADNESS LIES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48564 <p>Sandra Luckow (Director, Producer)<br />THAT WAY MADNESS LIES<br />(2017, 101 min, digital)<br />One woman navigates the broken mental health system with her family in an effort to save her brother as he descends into madness. Beginning as a testimony of his sanity, his iPhone video diary ultimately becomes an unfiltered look at the mind of an untreated schizophrenic.</p> Tuesday, February 27 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48678 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, February 28 IT’S ALWAYS LATE FOR FREEDOM + THE LAST DAYS OF WINTER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48587 <p>IT&rsquo;S ALWAYS LATE FOR FREEDOM / HAMISHE BARAYE AZADI DIR AST<br />(2007, 52 min, digital. In Farsi with English subtitles.)<br />IT&rsquo;S ALWAYS LATE FOR FREEDOM is the first film in Oskouei&rsquo;s trilogy about teenagers and prison. As always, Oskouei excels at developing a rare level of trust with his subjects, who seem completely natural as they discuss profoundly difficult subjects. The film includes images of 12-year-old boys writhing in agony as they suffer through crack withdrawal. Less concerned with the root social causes of his subjects&rsquo; social problems than in the subsequent two films in the trilogy, Oskouei here carefully avoids demonizing prison or the people who work there. His ability to frame teenagers in revealing ways is striking, particularly given the limited space with which he had to work.<br />&amp;<br />THE LAST DAYS OF WINTER / AKHARIN ROUZHAYE ZEMESTAN<br />(2011, 52 min, digital. In Farsi with English subtitles.)<br />The second part of Oskouei&rsquo;s trilogy, THE LAST DAYS OF WINTER depicts a group of shockingly young boys, all apparently drug addicts who wound up in trouble for stealing to support their habits. The film includes elements of cinema v&eacute;rit&eacute;, but the camerawork is closer to neo-realism, and Oskouei calls frequent attention to his own presence: although he never appears on-camera, his voice is heard throughout. He manages to achieve a rare degree of intimacy with his subjects, as they talk to the camera about deeply personal ideas, and when he goes outside with them, he has a knack for picking just the right locations in which to film them.</p> Wednesday, February 28 MEHRDAD OSKOUEI: SHORT FILM PROGRAM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2018#showing-48590 <p>THE ECLIPSE / ROZHGIRAN (2001, 14 min, video. Co-directed by Ebrahim Saeedi.)<br />THE WIDOWER / BIVEH MARD (2002, 19 min, digital)<br />I CAN&rsquo;T REMEMBER ANYTHING ABOUT AFGHANISTAN! / ROO BE JAEI DOOR (2002, 18 min, digital)<br />Total running time: ca. 55 min.</p> Wednesday, February 28 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48728 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Thursday, March 01 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48729 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Thursday, March 01 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48730 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Friday, March 02 EC: CITIZEN KANE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48744 <p>&ldquo;Welles&rsquo;s first feature is probably the most respected, analyzed, and parodied of all films. Although its archival and historical value are unchallenged, CITIZEN KANE, nevertheless, seems fresh on each new viewing. The film touches on so many aspects of American life &ndash; politics and sex, friendship and betrayal, youth and old age &ndash; that it has become a film for all moods and generations. In its expansive way, it creates a kaleidoscopic panorama of a man&rsquo;s life. Loosely based on the life of the newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, CITIZEN KANE is the saga of the rise to power of a &lsquo;poor little rich boy&rsquo; starved for affection, as Welles himself was after his parents&rsquo; early deaths. It is also a meditation on emotional greed, the ease of amassing wealth, and the difficulty of sustaining love.&rdquo; &ndash;MoMA</p> Friday, March 02 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48731 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Friday, March 02 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48732 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Saturday, March 03 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48733 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Saturday, March 03 EC: CITIZEN KANE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48745 <p>&ldquo;Welles&rsquo;s first feature is probably the most respected, analyzed, and parodied of all films. Although its archival and historical value are unchallenged, CITIZEN KANE, nevertheless, seems fresh on each new viewing. The film touches on so many aspects of American life &ndash; politics and sex, friendship and betrayal, youth and old age &ndash; that it has become a film for all moods and generations. In its expansive way, it creates a kaleidoscopic panorama of a man&rsquo;s life. Loosely based on the life of the newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, CITIZEN KANE is the saga of the rise to power of a &lsquo;poor little rich boy&rsquo; starved for affection, as Welles himself was after his parents&rsquo; early deaths. It is also a meditation on emotional greed, the ease of amassing wealth, and the difficulty of sustaining love.&rdquo; &ndash;MoMA</p> Saturday, March 03 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48734 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Saturday, March 03 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48735 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Sunday, March 04 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48736 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Sunday, March 04 EC: CITIZEN KANE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48746 <p>&ldquo;Welles&rsquo;s first feature is probably the most respected, analyzed, and parodied of all films. Although its archival and historical value are unchallenged, CITIZEN KANE, nevertheless, seems fresh on each new viewing. The film touches on so many aspects of American life &ndash; politics and sex, friendship and betrayal, youth and old age &ndash; that it has become a film for all moods and generations. In its expansive way, it creates a kaleidoscopic panorama of a man&rsquo;s life. Loosely based on the life of the newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, CITIZEN KANE is the saga of the rise to power of a &lsquo;poor little rich boy&rsquo; starved for affection, as Welles himself was after his parents&rsquo; early deaths. It is also a meditation on emotional greed, the ease of amassing wealth, and the difficulty of sustaining love.&rdquo; &ndash;MoMA</p> Sunday, March 04 WEREWOLF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2018#showing-48737 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Andrew Gillis and Bhreagh Macneil. Distributed by Factory 25.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashley McKenzie&rsquo;s feature debut, after a string of sterling shorts, tracks two methadone-swigging wastrels whose chemical dependencies have them eking out a feral existence in small-town Nova Scotia. The narrative materials are generic&hellip;but the filmmaking is vivid and specific. Smart visual choices abound: close-cropped Blaise is introduced as a man literally at the end of his rope; his girlfriend Nessa crumbles Oreos in an ice-cream shop contraption suggesting a Sisyphean cycle; a burdensome bit of equipment lugged to and fro makes the production&rsquo;s debt to ROSETTA (1999) and L&rsquo;ENFANT (2005) clear. What McKenzie is really borrowing from the Dardennes, though, is not the spare, festival-ready aesthetic &ndash; which is actually closer to Lucrecia Martel&rsquo;s stylized sound design and bisected bodies &ndash; but a genuinely materialist sensibility, minus any traces of the brothers&rsquo; redemptive spirituality. There&rsquo;s a bare minimum of junkie poetry here: addiction is not a tragic state of grace but just one more self-destructive compulsion among many, while the finely gradated interactions between the protagonists and different representatives of various institutional establishments place empathy and ambivalence side by side, where they belong.&rdquo; &ndash;Adam Nayman, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />&ldquo;WEREWOLF isn&rsquo;t a horror movie in substance but in spirit. It&rsquo;s a drama about the virtual possession of souls and transformation of bodies caused by drug addiction, and McKenzie&rsquo;s miraculous filming of two young people in its grip is similarly poised at the boundary of bodies and souls. [&hellip;] Filming in a quiet place of rustic isolation, McKenzie narrows her scope of vision to discern and magnify tremors of an involuntary and unconscious power. She looks at Nessa and Blaise with an urgent intimacy that often bypasses facial expressions to isolate aspects of the body &ndash; including facial features, hand gestures, postures, or even tools and articles of clothing &ndash; that transmit emotions without declaring them.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER</p> Sunday, March 04