Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Mon, 21 Jan 2019 05:23:14 -0500 CITY SYMPHONIES: THOROUGHFARES AND NEIGHBORHOODS, PROGRAM 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50355 <p>Boris Kaufman LES HALLES CENTRALES (1927, 22 min, 35mm. Restored print courtesy of CNC &ndash; Direction du patrimoine.)<br />Andor von Barsy HIGH STREET / HOOGSTRAAT (1929, 12 min, 35mm, silent. Print courtesy of EYE Filmmuseum.)<br />Friedrich Kuplent PRATER (1929, 14 min, 35mm, silent. Restored print courtesy of the Austrian Film Museum.)<br />Eug&egrave;ne Deslaw MONTPARNASSE, PO&Egrave;ME DU CAF&Eacute; CR&Egrave;ME (1930, 15 min, 35mm, silent. Restored print courtesy of CNC &ndash; Direction du patrimoine.)<br />Total running time: ca. 70 min.<br /><br /><em><strong>The 35mm print of HIGH STREET that we arranged to borrow did not arrive - as a result, we'll be screening that film from a digital transfer courtesy of the EYE Filmmuseum. The other three films in the program WILL be screening from imported 35mm prints restored by the CNC and Austrian Film Museum, as originally announced.<br /></strong></em></p> Monday, January 21 MERCE CUNNINGHAM CENTENNIAL: PROGRAM 3 - CHARLES ATLAS IN PERSON! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50247 <p>In FRACTIONS I, four video monitors share the screen space with the dancers, displaying close-ups of the performers throughout the dance. The images mediated by the monitors share the same &ldquo;tense&rdquo; as the live dancers, calling attention to the limited frame imposed by video recording, and provoking the boundaries of perception. To create CHANNELS/INSERTS, Cunningham and Atlas divided the Company&rsquo;s Westbeth studio into sixteen possible areas for dancing and used chance methods based on the I Ching to determine the order in which these spaces would be used, the number of dancers to be seen, and the events that would occur in each space. Atlas employed cross-cutting and animated mattes or wipes to indicate a simultaneity of dance events occurring in different spaces, as well as to allow for diversity in the continuity of the image.<br /><br />Charles Atlas<br />FRACTIONS I<br />1978, 32 min, 16mm. Dancers: Karole Armitage, Louise Burns, Graham Conley, Ellen Cornfield, Meg Eginton, Lisa Fox, Chris Komar &amp; Robert Kovich. Music: Jon Gibson, &ldquo;Equal Distribution.&rdquo;<br /><br />Charles Atlas<br />CHANNELS/INSERTS<br />1982, 32 min, 16mm. Dancers: Karole Armitage, Louise Burns, Ellen Cornfield, Susan Emery, Lise Friedman, Alan Good, Neil Greenberg, Catherine Kerr, Chris Komar, Judy Lazaroff, Joseph Lennon, Rob Remley, Robert Swinston &amp; Megan Walker. Music: David Tudor, &ldquo;PHONEMES.&rdquo;<br /><br />Both prints are courtesy of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.<br /><br /><em><strong>Charles Atlas will be here in person to present the program!</strong></em></p> Monday, January 21 CITY SYMPHONIES: THOROUGHFARES AND NEIGHBORHOODS, PROGRAM 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50358 <p>Jay Leyda A BRONX MORNING (1931, 11 min, 16mm. Preserved by The Museum of Modern Art with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Film Foundation.)<br />Jan Teunissen BARREL ORGAN / PIEREMENT (1931, 11 min, 35mm-to-digital, silent. Courtesy of EYE Filmmuseum.)<br />Jan Koelinga THE ALLEY / DE STEEG (1932, 12 min, 35mm-to-digital, silent. Courtesy of EYE Filmmuseum.)<br />Conrad Friberg HALSTED STREET (1934, 11 min, 16mm, silent)<br />Paul Schuitema DE MAASBRUGGEN (1937, 14 min, 35mm-to-digital. Courtesy of EYE Filmmuseum.)<br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.<br /><br /><em><strong>We regret to announce that the 35mm prints we arranged to borrow for BARREL ORGAN, THE ALLEY, and DE MAASBRUGGEN did not arrive - as a result, we'll be screening those three films from digital transfers courtesy of the EYE Filmmuseum.</strong></em></p> Monday, January 21 NYWIFT: EMPOWERED DAMES + TAKE MY NOSE…PLEASE! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50304 <p>Claudine Marrotte (Director/Producer/NYWIFT Member) EMPOWERED DAMES (2018, 10 min, digital)<br />A short documentary that brings a positive message of women successfully working in the film and television business.<br /><br />Joan Kron (Director/Producer/NYWIFT Member), Andrea Miller (Producer/NYWIFT Member) &amp; Judy Twersky (PR Consultant/NYWIFT Member)<br />TAKE MY NOSE&hellip;PLEASE!<br />(2017, 99 min, digital)<br />A wickedly subversive look at the role of comedy in exposing society&rsquo;s ambivalence toward cosmetic surgery, this film follows two comedians &ndash; Emily Askin and Jackie Hoffman &ndash; as they consider going under the knife. As we follow their surprisingly emotional stories, we meet others who have taken the leap &ndash; or held out. Putting it all in perspective are psychologists, sociologists, and cultural critics. And for comic relief and the profundity only comedians can supply, there are cameos by, among others, Judy Gold, Julie Halston, Lisa Lampanelli, Giulia Rozzi, Bill Scheft, and Adrianne Tolsch.</p> Tuesday, January 22 EC: SUNRISE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50170 <p>Script by Carl Meyer based on the story &ldquo;A Trip to Tilsit&rdquo; by Herman Sudermann. Photographed by Charles Rosher and Karl Strauss. With George O&rsquo;Brien and Janet Gaynor.<br /><br />Murnau&rsquo;s first American film is an allegory set in no particular time or place, about a man who is temporarily overruled by his passions, inflamed by the power of evil as personified by the city woman, and who finally returns to his senses and the orderly family life of the country. It is a virtuoso exercise representing the expressiveness of the silent film as it neared its end.</p> Tuesday, January 22 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50214 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, January 23 EC: GEORGES MÉLIÈS, PROGRAM #1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50175 <p>All films in this program are b&amp;w and silent.<br /><br />THE CONJUROR / L&rsquo;ILLUSIONISTE FIN DE SI&Egrave;CLE (1899, 1 min, 35mm)<br />TRIP TO THE MOON / VOYAGE DANS LA LUNE (1902, 12 min, 35mm)<br />THE PALACE OF THE ARABIAN NIGHTS / LE PALAIS DES MILLE ET UNE NUITS (1905, 21 min, 35mm)<br />DELIRIUM IN A STUDIO / ALI BARBOUYOU ALI BOUF &Agrave; L&rsquo;HUILE (1907, 5 min, 35mm)<br />MERRY FROLICS OF SATAN / LES QUATRES CENT FARCES DU DIABLE (1906, 18 min, 35mm)<br /><br />Magician, master of special effects, M&eacute;li&egrave;s broke with the realistic (Lumi&egrave;re) mode of cinema and celebrated unlimited fantasy and artificiality (in its best sense).<br /><br />Total running time:&nbsp;ca. 60 min.</p> Wednesday, January 23 EC: GEORGES MÉLIÈS, PROGRAM #2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50176 <p>The films on this program are hand-tinted and silent.<br /><br />THE CASCADE OF FIRE / LA CASCADE DE FEU (1904, 3 min, 35mm)<br />A DIABOLICAL TENANT / UN LOCATAIRE DIABOLIQUE (1909, 8 min, 35mm)<br />THE HUNCHBACK FAIRY / LA F&Eacute;E CARABOSSE (1906, 13 min, 35mm)<br />VOYAGE ACROSS THE IMPOSSIBLE / LE VOYAGE &Agrave; TRAVERS L&rsquo;IMPOSSIBLE (1904, 20 min, 35mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 50 min.</p> Wednesday, January 23 SHOW & TELL: LEARNING FROM BUFFALO http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50311 <p>Rima Yamazaki&rsquo;s body of work consists of a series of unusually patient and perceptive portraits of artists of many different kinds, including painter Rackstraw Downes, sculptor and photographer James Casebere, and video and performance artist Joan Jonas, as well as a film about Tokyo&rsquo;s extraordinary Nakagin Capsule Tower, a rare built example of the Japanese Metabolist architectural movement, designed by Kisho Kurokawa. Her latest and in some ways most ambitious film is a typically meditative but larger scale investigation of the city of Buffalo, NY. In keeping with Yamazaki&rsquo;s past interest in individual artists, much of LEARNING FROM BUFFALO consists of beautifully photographed cinematic encounters with the various architectural masterpieces &ndash; both celebrated and under-recognized &ndash; that grace the city&rsquo;s landscape, including Frank Lloyd Wright&rsquo;s Darwin D. Martin House, Louis Sullivan&rsquo;s Guaranty Building, Eliel and Eero Saarinen&rsquo;s Kleinhans Music Hall, and many others. But she also racks focus to take in more vernacular forms of architecture, and to tease out weighty questions of urban planning, the rise and fall of an American city, and the social and cultural struggles that haunt Buffalo &ndash; and so many similar cities &ndash; to this day. Moving back and forth between architectural documentation, historical testimony, and interviews with Buffalo residents of varying classes, she depicts the many dimensions of a city plagued by departing industries, a plethora of vacant properties, and great economic and racial disparities. Exploring the architecture and cityscape of the post-industrial American city, LEARNING FROM BUFFALO meditates on the relationship between architecture, city, society, and history.</p> Thursday, January 24 EC: GEORGES MÉLIÈS, PROGRAM #3 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50177 <p>All films in this program are b&amp;w and silent.<br /><br />EXTRAORDINARY ILLUSIONS / ILLUSIONS FUNAMBULESQUES (1903, 3 min, 16mm)<br />THE ENCHANTED WELL / LE PUITS FANTASTIQUE (1903, 3 min, 16mm)<br />THE APPARITION / LE REVENANT (1903, 3 min, 16mm)<br />TUNNEL UNDER THE CHANNEL / LE TUNNEL SOUS LA MANCHE (1907, 25 min, 35mm)<br />SIGHTSEEING THROUGH WHISKY / PAUVRE JEAN OU LES MESAVENTURES D&rsquo;UN BUVEUR (1909, 5 min, 35mm)<br />THE DOCTOR&rsquo;S SECRET / HYDROTH&Eacute;RAPIE FANTASTIQUE (1909, 11 min, 35mm)<br />Total running time: ca. 55 min.</p> Thursday, January 24 SHOW & TELL: LEARNING FROM BUFFALO http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50312 <p>Rima Yamazaki&rsquo;s body of work consists of a series of unusually patient and perceptive portraits of artists of many different kinds, including painter Rackstraw Downes, sculptor and photographer James Casebere, and video and performance artist Joan Jonas, as well as a film about Tokyo&rsquo;s extraordinary Nakagin Capsule Tower, a rare built example of the Japanese Metabolist architectural movement, designed by Kisho Kurokawa. Her latest and in some ways most ambitious film is a typically meditative but larger scale investigation of the city of Buffalo, NY. In keeping with Yamazaki&rsquo;s past interest in individual artists, much of LEARNING FROM BUFFALO consists of beautifully photographed cinematic encounters with the various architectural masterpieces &ndash; both celebrated and under-recognized &ndash; that grace the city&rsquo;s landscape, including Frank Lloyd Wright&rsquo;s Darwin D. Martin House, Louis Sullivan&rsquo;s Guaranty Building, Eliel and Eero Saarinen&rsquo;s Kleinhans Music Hall, and many others. But she also racks focus to take in more vernacular forms of architecture, and to tease out weighty questions of urban planning, the rise and fall of an American city, and the social and cultural struggles that haunt Buffalo &ndash; and so many similar cities &ndash; to this day. Moving back and forth between architectural documentation, historical testimony, and interviews with Buffalo residents of varying classes, she depicts the many dimensions of a city plagued by departing industries, a plethora of vacant properties, and great economic and racial disparities. Exploring the architecture and cityscape of the post-industrial American city, LEARNING FROM BUFFALO meditates on the relationship between architecture, city, society, and history.</p> Friday, January 25 PENNY SLINGER – OUT OF THE SHADOWS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50380 <p><br /><strong>PENNY SLINGER &amp; RICHARD KOVITCH IN PERSON FOR BOTH SHOWS!</strong></p> <p>Penny Slinger (b. 1947, London) is a Los Angeles-based artist who has been exploring the connection between eroticism, mysticism, feminism, and art for over fifty years. During her studies at the Chelsea College of Art in late 1960s London, Slinger became interested in the world of dreams and myths, which deeply influenced her own practice, mining Surrealist imagery to plumb the depths of the feminine psyche and subconscious. This led her to discover the toolkit of Tantra and to examine and express the more liberated realms of superconsciousness. Using a range of media including photographic collage, 16mm film, and sculpture, Slinger&rsquo;s lexicon of symbols examines how a woman is seen and how she sees herself &ndash; woman as goddess, woman as object of desire, and other lenses. In these works Slinger presents the body (often her own) and its parts as vehicles for expressing states of consciousness. Her bodies are not passive, but instead actively investigate all aspects of the psychological and sensual worlds of the awakening feminine. In these ways Slinger boldly unveils the taboo, the transgressive, the sacred, and the profane.<br /><br />This new documentary unfolds the untold story of Penny Slinger and the traumatic events that led to the creation of her masterpiece, the 1977 photo-romance, &ldquo;An Exorcism.&rdquo; Coming of age against a backdrop of post-war austerity and the subsequent explosion of color that characterized the 1960s counter-culture, Slinger embraced her generation&rsquo;s quest for personal freedom and sexual liberation, and channeled these desires into her groundbreaking collages, films, and sculptures. So powerful was her vision that fifty years later her work is still influencing contemporary artists. Propelled by an original, hypnotic soundtrack by Psychological Strategy Board, Richard Kovitch&rsquo;s film finally brings Penny Slinger &ldquo;Out of the Shadows,&rdquo; immersing us in her extraordinary body of work, and presenting it anew for a contemporary audience.<br /><br /><em><strong>Fri, Jan 25 at 7:30: Penny Slinger, Richard Kovitch &amp; Alison Gingeras in conversation</strong></em><br /><em><strong>Tues, Jan 29 at 6:45: Penny Slinger &amp; Richard Kovitch in person</strong></em></p> Friday, January 25 EC: MARIE MENKEN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50178 <p>All films preserved by Anthology Film Archives.<br /><br />GLIMPSE OF THE GARDEN (1957, 5 min, 16mm)<br />NOTEBOOK (1962-63, 10 min, 16mm, silent)<br />ARABESQUE FOR KENNETH ANGER (1961, 4 min, 16mm)<br />EYE MUSIC IN RED MAJOR (1961, 4 min, 16mm, silent)<br />GO! GO! GO! (1962-64, 12 min, 16mm, silent)<br />LIGHTS (1964-66, 7 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />ANDY WARHOL (1965, 17 min, 16mm)<br /><br />&ldquo;Marie Menken pioneered the radical transformation of the handheld, somatic camera into a formal matrix that would underpin an entire work in the films she made between 1945 and 1965. [&hellip;] The extraordinary cinematic style that I have been calling Menken&rsquo;s somatic camera has been her most influential gift to the American avant-garde cinema. It is an embodiment of the Emersonian invention of a pictorial air, the spiritual emancipation automatically brought about by &lsquo;certain mechanical changes, a small alteration in our local position.&rsquo; It is also analogous to the equally Emersonian somatic theory of poesis Charles Olson was developing at nearly the same time: his emphasis on breath and proprioception corresponds to Menken&rsquo;s identification of the camera with her body in motion and her cultivation of the respiratory and nervous agitation of the handheld camera even in its quietest moments.&rdquo; &ndash;P. Adams Sitney, EYES UPSIDE DOWN<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.</p> Saturday, January 26 THE EARLY FILMS OF PENNY SLINGER - Penny Slinger in person! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50383 <p><br /><em><strong>PENNY SLINGER IN PERSON, FOR A Q&amp;A WITH CURATORS ALISON GINGERAS &amp; NICOLETTA BEYER!</strong></em><br /><br />Penny Slinger (b. 1947, London) is a Los Angeles-based artist who has been exploring the connection between eroticism, mysticism, feminism, and art for over fifty years. During her studies at the Chelsea College of Art in late 1960s London, Slinger became interested in the world of dreams and myths, which deeply influenced her own practice, mining Surrealist imagery to plumb the depths of the feminine psyche and subconscious. This led her to discover the toolkit of Tantra and to examine and express the more liberated realms of superconsciousness. Using a range of media including photographic collage, 16mm film, and sculpture, Slinger&rsquo;s lexicon of symbols examines how a woman is seen and how she sees herself &ndash; woman as goddess, woman as object of desire, and other lenses. In these works Slinger presents the body (often her own) and its parts as vehicles for expressing states of consciousness. Her bodies are not passive, but instead actively investigate all aspects of the psychological and sensual worlds of the awakening feminine. In these ways Slinger boldly unveils the taboo, the transgressive, the sacred, and the profane.<br /><br />The first four titles presented here are short films created by Slinger in 1969, some directly related to her thesis presentation at Chelsea College of Art. Incorporating her visual art and other projects of that time &ndash; drawings, sculpture, installation, and performance &ndash; these short works explore the young artist&rsquo;s burgeoning interests in dreams, myths, the feminine psyche, and the patriarchal consumption of the female form.<br /><br />Shot in a derelict mansion in Northamptonshire, LILFORD HALL is a collaboration with filmmaker Peter Whitehead, featuring Slinger and Suzanka Fraey. Never finished, the uncut footage documents the artists experimenting with themes of the unconscious and the metaphysical, imagery that would later serve as material for the hauntingly surreal series of collages in Slinger&rsquo;s seminal publication, &ldquo;An Exorcism&rdquo; (1977). Slinger stated of this series, &ldquo;the images and accompanying captions present a record of the &lsquo;unraveling&rsquo; of the Self from dualistic limitations and the projections of others. It sets an example for psychic confrontation and transformation.&rdquo;<br /><br />1969 EXHIBIT (1969, 3.5 min, 16mm-to-digital, silent)<br />MOUTHS AND MASKS (1969, 5 min, 16mm-to-digital, silent)<br />STAIRS, TUNNELS AND MIRRORS (1969, 11 min, 16mm-to-digital, silent)<br />MAX ERNST, UNE SEMAINE DE BONTE (1969, 12.5 min, 16mm-to-digital, silent)<br />LILFORD HALL (1969, ca. 30-min excerpt, 16mm-to-digital, silent)<br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.</p> Saturday, January 26 EC: ROBERT NELSON http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50179 <p>THE GREAT BLONDINO<br />(1967, 42 min, 16mm. Preservation print, with thanks to the Academy Film Archive.)<br /><br />&ldquo;The original Blondino was a 19th-century tightrope artist who among other feats crossed Niagara Falls trundling a wheelbarrow. In this film, Nelson sees Blondino as a metaphor for those who still try. Too subtle to be allegorical, the picture is in the shape of a quixotic search in which the goal is the journey and the means is the end.&rdquo; &ndash;MUSEUM OF MODERN ART<br /><br />&ldquo;It is&hellip;difficult to get at the rich visual texture that is the film&rsquo;s most striking attribute. Long stretches are concerned with Blondino&rsquo;s visions, dreams, and dreams within dreams. The film unfolds in brief recurring patterns of imagery. Even the more straightforward sections are dense with interpolated newsreel and TV commercial footage, visual gags, and homemade special effects. The net effect is funny, seamless, and elusive.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, &ldquo;A Filmmakers Filming Monograph&rdquo;<br /><br />&amp;<br /><br />BLEU SHUT<br />(1970, 33 min, 16mm. Preservation print, with thanks to the Academy Film Archive.)<br /><br />&ldquo;Boat-name quizzes, dogs, cuts from Dreyer&rsquo;s JOAN OF ARC in montage with a sultry whore, a car running up a ramp and crashing, pornography, a passionate embrace by a thirties hero and heroine; all somehow implicating Dreyer and Joan in the perverse synthesis of sex and technology. What&rsquo;s happening here? Basically Nelson is leaving things unsaid.&rdquo; &ndash;Leo Regan<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Saturday, January 26 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50385 <p>The unsung legacy of Jane Arden (1927-82) traverses the reaches of film and theater, encompassing film direction, screenwriting, playwriting, acting, as well as poetry and songwriting. After years spent working in television and theater, in the mid 1960s Arden became increasingly focused on feminism and the anti-psychiatry movement, shifting her output to stories centered on women and their societally imposed psycho-emotional burdens. Arden&rsquo;s reputation as a leading voice in the UK women&rsquo;s liberation movement solidified in the late 1960s and early 70s &ndash; she established the radical feminist theater group Holocaust, with Penny Slinger as a member, and wrote &ldquo;A New Communion for Freaks, Prophets and Witches,&rdquo; a play that would soon be adapted into the psychedelic arthouse film THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH. Her film work has been described as a sort of self-induced alternate form of therapy, her storylines quasi-biographical tales of unfolding psychological turmoil. Following her untimely death, her longtime lover and collaborator Jack Bond chose to suppress their films and twenty-five years passed before they were rereleased to the public. A prolific underground icon of radical feminist cinema and theater, Arden&rsquo;s books are long out of print, her plays unperformed, and her films rarely screened.<br /><br />The only British feature film of the 1970s to be solely directed by a woman, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH functions as a particularly revealing portrait of Arden&rsquo;s vision of a tortured inner life. Dressed in Victorian garb, the Holocaust theater group actors (including Penny Slinger) portray asylum inmates in the Welsh countryside. Reality and performance continually blur, as these horror-filled scenes variously incorporate non-actors such as local mentally-ill children.</p> Saturday, January 26 SEPARATION + VIBRATION http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50388 <p>The unsung legacy of Jane Arden (1927-82) traverses the reaches of film and theater, encompassing film direction, screenwriting, playwriting, acting, as well as poetry and songwriting. After years spent working in television and theater, in the mid 1960s Arden became increasingly focused on feminism and the anti-psychiatry movement, shifting her output to stories centered on women and their societally imposed psycho-emotional burdens. Arden&rsquo;s reputation as a leading voice in the UK women&rsquo;s liberation movement solidified in the late 1960s and early 70s &ndash; she established the radical feminist theater group Holocaust, with Penny Slinger as a member, and wrote &ldquo;A New Communion for Freaks, Prophets and Witches,&rdquo; a play that would soon be adapted into the psychedelic arthouse film THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH. Her film work has been described as a sort of self-induced alternate form of therapy, her storylines quasi-biographical tales of unfolding psychological turmoil. Following her untimely death, her longtime lover and collaborator Jack Bond chose to suppress their films and twenty-five years passed before they were rereleased to the public. A prolific underground icon of radical feminist cinema and theater, Arden&rsquo;s books are long out of print, her plays unperformed, and her films rarely screened.<br /><br />Jack Bond<br />SEPARATION<br />(1968, 93 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />Written by and starring Arden, SEPARATION was her feature film after her politically-geared graduation into the realms of feminism and anti-psychiatry. SEPARATION follows the decline of the fractured mental state of protagonist &ldquo;Jane&rdquo; as she navigates the loss of a child and the dissolution of her marriage.<br /><br />Jane Arden &amp; Jack Bond<br />VIBRATION<br />(1975, 36 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />A directorial collaboration between Arden and Bond, this film explores the unconscious and the mystical system of Sufism via experimental video techniques and the journeys of two Western protagonists (one of which is played by Penny Slinger).</p> Sunday, January 27 DADDY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50394 <p>The films of Niki de Saint Phalle (1930-2002) exist within a multi-faceted oeuvre that encompasses grand scale sculpture, action painting, theater performance, and even a commercial endeavor as an artist-perfumer. The self-taught French-American artist is primarily recognized for her jubilant female figures known as &ldquo;Nanas,&rdquo; but her filmic works reveal the depths of trauma latently buried within a seemingly innocent creative output. Until recently, Niki de Saint Phalle&rsquo;s revolutionary practice as a filmmaker has remained shrouded in obscurity. Her two films &ndash; DADDY (1973) and UN R&Ecirc;VE PLUS LONG QUE LA NUIT (1976) &ndash; confront psychosexual themes such as incest, orgiastic sex, and apocalyptic rebellion. In offering these rare screenings, this program looks to recast Saint Phalle in her true light as one of the most radical feminist artists of the 20th century.<br /><br />For more information regarding Niki de Saint Phalle visit: nikidesaintphalle.org.<br /><br />A coming of age narrative made in collaboration with renowned documentary filmmaker Peter Whitehead, DADDY depicts an incestuous relationship between father and daughter, which Saint Phalle modeled on her own real life Oedipal trauma. When DADDY was released in 1973, the Village Voice called it &ldquo;a wildly uneven succession of images, of black and white and color photography, cartoons, collage, sculpture, action desecration, deconstructivist art, charades and masquerades, with a look that falls between avant-garde decadence and softcore pornography.&rdquo; While critics may not have welcomed Saint Phalle&rsquo;s transgression of structural orthodoxies, her unique contribution to cinema can be celebrated today for its entwinement of female sexual and artistic empowerment. DADDY transcends autobiographical confessional to become an anti-Oedipal, anarchafeminist manifesto that places sexual agency as the fulcrum of Niki de Saint Phalle&rsquo;s artistic practice.<br /><br /><em><strong>CAST MEMBER CLARICE RIVERS IN CONVERSATION WITH ALISON GINGERAS FOLLOWING THE SCREENING ON SUNDAY, JANUARY 27!</strong></em></p> Sunday, January 27 UN RÊVE PLUS LONG QUE LA NUIT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50397 <p>The films of Niki de Saint Phalle (1930-2002) exist within a multi-faceted oeuvre that encompasses grand scale sculpture, action painting, theater performance, and even a commercial endeavor as an artist-perfumer. The self-taught French-American artist is primarily recognized for her jubilant female figures known as &ldquo;Nanas,&rdquo; but her filmic works reveal the depths of trauma latently buried within a seemingly innocent creative output. Until recently, Niki de Saint Phalle&rsquo;s revolutionary practice as a filmmaker has remained shrouded in obscurity. Her two films &ndash; DADDY (1973) and UN R&Ecirc;VE PLUS LONG QUE LA NUIT (1976) &ndash; confront psychosexual themes such as incest, orgiastic sex, and apocalyptic rebellion. In offering these rare screenings, this program looks to recast Saint Phalle in her true light as one of the most radical feminist artists of the 20th century.<br /><br />For more information regarding Niki de Saint Phalle visit: nikidesaintphalle.org.<br /><br />In this heady, phantasmagoric fairy tale, a young girl comes face to face with a friendly dragon and a magnanimous witch. Upon the witch granting the girl&rsquo;s wish to become a young woman, this surrealist chronicle follows the precocious Cam&eacute;lia on a series of quests in pursuit of love. Niki de Saint Phalle&rsquo;s sophomore film revels in the sexual decadence that defined the 1970s zeitgeist, showcasing scenes of debauched harems and totemic worship of phallic sculptures. An astounding piece of directorial bravery, UN R&Ecirc;VE PLUS LONG QUE LA NUIT confirms Saint Phalle&rsquo;s wicked yet earnest pleasure in excavating the underlying perversions at play within the romantic quiet of fairy tales.</p> Sunday, January 27 ANTI-CLOCK http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50391 <p>The unsung legacy of Jane Arden (1927-82) traverses the reaches of film and theater, encompassing film direction, screenwriting, playwriting, acting, as well as poetry and songwriting. After years spent working in television and theater, in the mid 1960s Arden became increasingly focused on feminism and the anti-psychiatry movement, shifting her output to stories centered on women and their societally imposed psycho-emotional burdens. Arden&rsquo;s reputation as a leading voice in the UK women&rsquo;s liberation movement solidified in the late 1960s and early 70s &ndash; she established the radical feminist theater group Holocaust, with Penny Slinger as a member, and wrote &ldquo;A New Communion for Freaks, Prophets and Witches,&rdquo; a play that would soon be adapted into the psychedelic arthouse film THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH. Her film work has been described as a sort of self-induced alternate form of therapy, her storylines quasi-biographical tales of unfolding psychological turmoil. Following her untimely death, her longtime lover and collaborator Jack Bond chose to suppress their films and twenty-five years passed before they were rereleased to the public. A prolific underground icon of radical feminist cinema and theater, Arden&rsquo;s books are long out of print, her plays unperformed, and her films rarely screened.<br /><br />Written and co-directed by Arden, this sci-fi psychodrama was her final film before her death. ANTI-CLOCK showcases experimental blends of cinema and video techniques, and tells the fragmented tale of Joseph Sapha (played by Arden&rsquo;s eldest son, Sebastian Saville), a suicidal young man who is made the subject of a psychological experiment in memory manipulation.</p> Monday, January 28 MERCE CUNNINGHAM CENTENNIAL: PROGRAM 4 - ELLIOT CAPLAN IN PERSON! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50249 <p>ELLIOT CAPLAN IN PERSON!<br /><br />Elliot Caplan<br />POINTS IN SPACE<br />(1986, 55 min, video. Dancers: Helen Barrow, Merce Cunningham, Victoria Finlayson, Alan Good, Catherine Kerr, Chris Komar, David Kulick, Patricia Lent, Karen Radford, Rob Remley, Kristy Santimyer, Kevin Schroder, Carol Teitelbaum, Megan Walker &amp; Susan Quinn. Music: John Cage, &ldquo;Voiceless Essay.&rdquo;)<br /><br />Elliot Caplan&rsquo;s documentary for the BBC offers a rare behind-the-scenes perspective on the complexities and exhilarations of bringing a new dance to television. Cunningham, Cage, and members of the company are interviewed alongside scenes from rehearsals in New York and London. The documentary culminates in a full staging of the POINTS IN SPACE dance.</p> Monday, January 28 DADDY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50395 <p>The films of Niki de Saint Phalle (1930-2002) exist within a multi-faceted oeuvre that encompasses grand scale sculpture, action painting, theater performance, and even a commercial endeavor as an artist-perfumer. The self-taught French-American artist is primarily recognized for her jubilant female figures known as &ldquo;Nanas,&rdquo; but her filmic works reveal the depths of trauma latently buried within a seemingly innocent creative output. Until recently, Niki de Saint Phalle&rsquo;s revolutionary practice as a filmmaker has remained shrouded in obscurity. Her two films &ndash; DADDY (1973) and UN R&Ecirc;VE PLUS LONG QUE LA NUIT (1976) &ndash; confront psychosexual themes such as incest, orgiastic sex, and apocalyptic rebellion. In offering these rare screenings, this program looks to recast Saint Phalle in her true light as one of the most radical feminist artists of the 20th century.<br /><br />For more information regarding Niki de Saint Phalle visit: nikidesaintphalle.org.<br /><br />A coming of age narrative made in collaboration with renowned documentary filmmaker Peter Whitehead, DADDY depicts an incestuous relationship between father and daughter, which Saint Phalle modeled on her own real life Oedipal trauma. When DADDY was released in 1973, the Village Voice called it &ldquo;a wildly uneven succession of images, of black and white and color photography, cartoons, collage, sculpture, action desecration, deconstructivist art, charades and masquerades, with a look that falls between avant-garde decadence and softcore pornography.&rdquo; While critics may not have welcomed Saint Phalle&rsquo;s transgression of structural orthodoxies, her unique contribution to cinema can be celebrated today for its entwinement of female sexual and artistic empowerment. DADDY transcends autobiographical confessional to become an anti-Oedipal, anarchafeminist manifesto that places sexual agency as the fulcrum of Niki de Saint Phalle&rsquo;s artistic practice.<br /><br /><em><strong>CAST MEMBER CLARICE RIVERS IN CONVERSATION WITH ALISON GINGERAS FOLLOWING THE SCREENING ON SUNDAY, JANUARY 27!</strong></em></p> Monday, January 28 PENNY SLINGER – OUT OF THE SHADOWS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50381 <p><br /><strong>PENNY SLINGER &amp; RICHARD KOVITCH IN PERSON FOR BOTH SHOWS!</strong></p> <p>Penny Slinger (b. 1947, London) is a Los Angeles-based artist who has been exploring the connection between eroticism, mysticism, feminism, and art for over fifty years. During her studies at the Chelsea College of Art in late 1960s London, Slinger became interested in the world of dreams and myths, which deeply influenced her own practice, mining Surrealist imagery to plumb the depths of the feminine psyche and subconscious. This led her to discover the toolkit of Tantra and to examine and express the more liberated realms of superconsciousness. Using a range of media including photographic collage, 16mm film, and sculpture, Slinger&rsquo;s lexicon of symbols examines how a woman is seen and how she sees herself &ndash; woman as goddess, woman as object of desire, and other lenses. In these works Slinger presents the body (often her own) and its parts as vehicles for expressing states of consciousness. Her bodies are not passive, but instead actively investigate all aspects of the psychological and sensual worlds of the awakening feminine. In these ways Slinger boldly unveils the taboo, the transgressive, the sacred, and the profane.<br /><br />This new documentary unfolds the untold story of Penny Slinger and the traumatic events that led to the creation of her masterpiece, the 1977 photo-romance, &ldquo;An Exorcism.&rdquo; Coming of age against a backdrop of post-war austerity and the subsequent explosion of color that characterized the 1960s counter-culture, Slinger embraced her generation&rsquo;s quest for personal freedom and sexual liberation, and channeled these desires into her groundbreaking collages, films, and sculptures. So powerful was her vision that fifty years later her work is still influencing contemporary artists. Propelled by an original, hypnotic soundtrack by Psychological Strategy Board, Richard Kovitch&rsquo;s film finally brings Penny Slinger &ldquo;Out of the Shadows,&rdquo; immersing us in her extraordinary body of work, and presenting it anew for a contemporary audience.<br /><br /><em><strong>Fri, Jan 25 at 7:30: Penny Slinger, Richard Kovitch &amp; Alison Gingeras in conversation</strong></em><br /><em><strong>Tues, Jan 29 at 6:45: Penny Slinger &amp; Richard Kovitch in person</strong></em></p> Tuesday, January 29 FLAHERTY NYC: PROGRAM 2: TESTING A SUBJECT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50286 <p><strong>Lilli Carr&eacute; &amp; Kenneth Tam in person.<br /><br /></strong>&ldquo;Testing a Subject&rdquo; is populated by willing participants, domesticated animals, inert bodies, disobedient creations, robotic performers, and incidental actors. Through the revealing and often humorous process of testing these varied subjects, this program frames agency and control as central concerns. The social constructions of masculinity unravel in ways both amusing and revealing; the human and the artificial entwine in a curious and sensual blurring of authority. Confused, inarticulate, and debased, sometimes barely clearing the threshold of sentience, the subjects being tested also reveal themselves, in telling and poignant moments, to be stand-ins for their masters and creators.<br /><br />Mark Toscano RATING DOGS ON A SCALE OF 1-10 (2012, 2.5 min, 16mm)<br />Jeanne Dunning GETTING DRESSED (1999, 5 min, digital)<br />Daria Martin SOFT MATERIALS (2004, 10.5 min, 16mm)<br />Karl Sims EVOLVED VIRTUAL CREATURES (1994, 4 min, digital)<br />Lilli Carr&eacute; JILL (2016, 7 min, digital)<br />Joe Gibbons HIS MASTER&rsquo;S VOICE (1994, 6 min, digital)<br />Kenneth Tam BREAKFAST IN BED (2016, 32 min, digital)<br />Total running time: ca. 70 min.</p> Tuesday, January 29 UN RÊVE PLUS LONG QUE LA NUIT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50398 <p>The films of Niki de Saint Phalle (1930-2002) exist within a multi-faceted oeuvre that encompasses grand scale sculpture, action painting, theater performance, and even a commercial endeavor as an artist-perfumer. The self-taught French-American artist is primarily recognized for her jubilant female figures known as &ldquo;Nanas,&rdquo; but her filmic works reveal the depths of trauma latently buried within a seemingly innocent creative output. Until recently, Niki de Saint Phalle&rsquo;s revolutionary practice as a filmmaker has remained shrouded in obscurity. Her two films &ndash; DADDY (1973) and UN R&Ecirc;VE PLUS LONG QUE LA NUIT (1976) &ndash; confront psychosexual themes such as incest, orgiastic sex, and apocalyptic rebellion. In offering these rare screenings, this program looks to recast Saint Phalle in her true light as one of the most radical feminist artists of the 20th century.<br /><br />For more information regarding Niki de Saint Phalle visit: nikidesaintphalle.org.<br /><br />In this heady, phantasmagoric fairy tale, a young girl comes face to face with a friendly dragon and a magnanimous witch. Upon the witch granting the girl&rsquo;s wish to become a young woman, this surrealist chronicle follows the precocious Cam&eacute;lia on a series of quests in pursuit of love. Niki de Saint Phalle&rsquo;s sophomore film revels in the sexual decadence that defined the 1970s zeitgeist, showcasing scenes of debauched harems and totemic worship of phallic sculptures. An astounding piece of directorial bravery, UN R&Ecirc;VE PLUS LONG QUE LA NUIT confirms Saint Phalle&rsquo;s wicked yet earnest pleasure in excavating the underlying perversions at play within the romantic quiet of fairy tales.</p> Tuesday, January 29 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50215 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, January 30 SEPARATION + VIBRATION http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50389 <p>The unsung legacy of Jane Arden (1927-82) traverses the reaches of film and theater, encompassing film direction, screenwriting, playwriting, acting, as well as poetry and songwriting. After years spent working in television and theater, in the mid 1960s Arden became increasingly focused on feminism and the anti-psychiatry movement, shifting her output to stories centered on women and their societally imposed psycho-emotional burdens. Arden&rsquo;s reputation as a leading voice in the UK women&rsquo;s liberation movement solidified in the late 1960s and early 70s &ndash; she established the radical feminist theater group Holocaust, with Penny Slinger as a member, and wrote &ldquo;A New Communion for Freaks, Prophets and Witches,&rdquo; a play that would soon be adapted into the psychedelic arthouse film THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH. Her film work has been described as a sort of self-induced alternate form of therapy, her storylines quasi-biographical tales of unfolding psychological turmoil. Following her untimely death, her longtime lover and collaborator Jack Bond chose to suppress their films and twenty-five years passed before they were rereleased to the public. A prolific underground icon of radical feminist cinema and theater, Arden&rsquo;s books are long out of print, her plays unperformed, and her films rarely screened.<br /><br />Jack Bond<br />SEPARATION<br />(1968, 93 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />Written by and starring Arden, SEPARATION was her feature film after her politically-geared graduation into the realms of feminism and anti-psychiatry. SEPARATION follows the decline of the fractured mental state of protagonist &ldquo;Jane&rdquo; as she navigates the loss of a child and the dissolution of her marriage.<br /><br />Jane Arden &amp; Jack Bond<br />VIBRATION<br />(1975, 36 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />A directorial collaboration between Arden and Bond, this film explores the unconscious and the mystical system of Sufism via experimental video techniques and the journeys of two Western protagonists (one of which is played by Penny Slinger).</p> Wednesday, January 30 ANTI-CLOCK http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50392 <p>The unsung legacy of Jane Arden (1927-82) traverses the reaches of film and theater, encompassing film direction, screenwriting, playwriting, acting, as well as poetry and songwriting. After years spent working in television and theater, in the mid 1960s Arden became increasingly focused on feminism and the anti-psychiatry movement, shifting her output to stories centered on women and their societally imposed psycho-emotional burdens. Arden&rsquo;s reputation as a leading voice in the UK women&rsquo;s liberation movement solidified in the late 1960s and early 70s &ndash; she established the radical feminist theater group Holocaust, with Penny Slinger as a member, and wrote &ldquo;A New Communion for Freaks, Prophets and Witches,&rdquo; a play that would soon be adapted into the psychedelic arthouse film THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH. Her film work has been described as a sort of self-induced alternate form of therapy, her storylines quasi-biographical tales of unfolding psychological turmoil. Following her untimely death, her longtime lover and collaborator Jack Bond chose to suppress their films and twenty-five years passed before they were rereleased to the public. A prolific underground icon of radical feminist cinema and theater, Arden&rsquo;s books are long out of print, her plays unperformed, and her films rarely screened.<br /><br />Written and co-directed by Arden, this sci-fi psychodrama was her final film before her death. ANTI-CLOCK showcases experimental blends of cinema and video techniques, and tells the fragmented tale of Joseph Sapha (played by Arden&rsquo;s eldest son, Sebastian Saville), a suicidal young man who is made the subject of a psychological experiment in memory manipulation.</p> Wednesday, January 30 EC: SIDNEY PETERSON http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50180 <p>THE POTTED PSALM and THE PETRIFIED DOG have been preserved by Anthology Film Archives through the Avant-Garde Masters program funded by The Film Foundation and administered by the National Film Preservation Foundation. MR. FRENHOFFER AND THE MINOTAUR and THE LEAD SHOES have been preserved by Anthology with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation.<br /><br />THE POTTED PSALM (1946, 19 min, 16mm)<br />THE PETRIFIED DOG (1948, 19 min, 16mm)<br />MR. FRENHOFFER AND THE MINOTAUR (1949, 21 min, 16mm)<br />THE LEAD SHOES (1949, 17 min, 16mm)<br /><br />&ldquo;These images are meant to play not on our rational senses, but on the infinite universe of ambiguity within us.&rdquo; &ndash;Sidney Peterson<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Thursday, January 31 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=01&year=2019#showing-50386 <p>The unsung legacy of Jane Arden (1927-82) traverses the reaches of film and theater, encompassing film direction, screenwriting, playwriting, acting, as well as poetry and songwriting. After years spent working in television and theater, in the mid 1960s Arden became increasingly focused on feminism and the anti-psychiatry movement, shifting her output to stories centered on women and their societally imposed psycho-emotional burdens. Arden&rsquo;s reputation as a leading voice in the UK women&rsquo;s liberation movement solidified in the late 1960s and early 70s &ndash; she established the radical feminist theater group Holocaust, with Penny Slinger as a member, and wrote &ldquo;A New Communion for Freaks, Prophets and Witches,&rdquo; a play that would soon be adapted into the psychedelic arthouse film THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH. Her film work has been described as a sort of self-induced alternate form of therapy, her storylines quasi-biographical tales of unfolding psychological turmoil. Following her untimely death, her longtime lover and collaborator Jack Bond chose to suppress their films and twenty-five years passed before they were rereleased to the public. A prolific underground icon of radical feminist cinema and theater, Arden&rsquo;s books are long out of print, her plays unperformed, and her films rarely screened.<br /><br />The only British feature film of the 1970s to be solely directed by a woman, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE UNDERNEATH functions as a particularly revealing portrait of Arden&rsquo;s vision of a tortured inner life. Dressed in Victorian garb, the Holocaust theater group actors (including Penny Slinger) portray asylum inmates in the Welsh countryside. Reality and performance continually blur, as these horror-filled scenes variously incorporate non-actors such as local mentally-ill children.</p> Thursday, January 31 CLOSE-UP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50401 <p>The critical force of in-person reenactment is on full display in CLOSE-UP&rsquo;s structure and unique use of v&eacute;rit&eacute; address. Kiarostami&rsquo;s masterpiece focuses on Hossein Sabzian, who impersonated the famous filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf in order to ingratiate himself into the Ahankan family. As the film follows the actual trial initiated by the aggrieved family, it strategically intercuts reenacted scenes of the impersonator in &ldquo;action&rdquo; as evidence of sorts. Multiple levels of acting and mimetic passing are subject to Kiarostami&rsquo;s filmic modulation, as he charts Sabzian&rsquo;s progression from a passive resemblance to Makhmalbaf to active impersonation, from adopting the air of a director to achieving an actual position of authority over those who occupy a higher rung on the social ladder. For Kiarostami, reenactment is an instrument by which to sift through and set in relief the fluid, social dimensions of individual identity.</p> Friday, February 01 SHOW & TELL: DOWN CLAIBORNE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50314 <p><br /><em><strong>Big Chief Kevin Goodman will be here in person with filmmaker Moira Tierney for a Q&amp;A after all 3 screenings!</strong></em><br /><br />One of the most striking aspects of New Orleans&rsquo;s topography is a highway that cuts right through the city, slicing through, among others, the historic 7th Ward. Built in 1968, it dismantled one of the most active Black neighborhoods, which still operates under the shadows of the &ldquo;freeway.&rdquo; The local community reclaims their neighborhood using a variety of tactics: mural painting, represented by the frescoes painted onto the concrete pillars supporting the highway overpass, and collective masking traditions, as evidenced by the Mardi Gras Indians, in the neighborhoods surrounding the highway.<br /><br />These two elements of local culture share an insistence on the importance of history, highlighting its role in the perpetuation of the culture and in the ongoing resistance to its displacement. Their content often overlaps (the highway frescoes reference the Mardi Gras Indians as well as the Maroon tradition of runaway slaves and Native Americans forming independent communities) and both operate within the post-colonial &ldquo;profession of hybridization,&rdquo; as defined by Haitian poet René Depestre.<br /><br />DOWN CLAIBORNE zooms in on the Mississippi and down into the Treme, slides under the highway overpass and moves down Claiborne Avenue from pillar to pillar, building to a celebratory and cathartic climax with the Comanche Hunter and Hard Head Hunter tribes of the Mardi Gras Indians meeting in ceremonial battle on Mardi Gras.<br /><br />&ldquo;I shot on Super 8mm and 16mm silent film, editing in camera as much as possible. I wanted the sound track to add layers of information to the image, without providing an authoritative &lsquo;explanation.&rsquo; It was necessary to fill in the gaps in the official histories and I had the idea of the exchange of information via less linear circuitry. I constructed the &lsquo;scenario&rsquo; as a collage of voices: excerpts from New Orleans radio stations; spoken word (composed for the film by John Lacarbiere III); two jazz tracks contributed by Mario Abney; extracts from archival material or contemporary event listings; songs of the Mardi Gras Indians, courtesy of B.C. Goodman and B.C. Melancon; and the final voice-over, which was recorded impromptu by B.C. Goodman as we watched a cut of the film together.&rdquo; &ndash;Moira Tierney<br /><br /><strong>Advance tickets are now available <a href="https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4055343">here</a>!</strong></p> Friday, February 01 TORERO! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50404 <p>Archival print courtesy of the Filmoteca Espa&ntilde;ola.<br /><br />This Mexican biopic, which dramatizes famous bullfighter Luis Procuna&rsquo;s return to the arena after a long bout of anxiety, received a special mention for &ldquo;its contribution to the renewal of cinematic realism through the integration of real documents with reenactment&rdquo; at the Venice Film Festival, from a jury composed of none other than Luchino Visconti, Andre Bazin, and John Grierson. Velo, a renowned Spanish director exiled in Mexico in the 1930s, worked several years in newsreel production alongside Manuel Barbachano Ponce, a major producer of cine-verdad projects in Mexico, and his expertise shows in the veritable orgy of bullfight montages. TORERO!&rsquo;s hybrid texture, mixing documentary and fiction, as well as different film stocks, could not fail to impress Bazin, who marveled about the film&rsquo;s seamless editing of reenacted life with existing footage of Procuna&rsquo;s public appearances &ndash; his wedding, contract signing, and brushes with death.</p> Saturday, February 02 EC: MOTHER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50181 <p>(MAT)<br /><br />Based on the novel by Maxim Gorky.<br /><br />With the simple theme of a working-class mother growing in political consciousness through participation in revolutionary activity, this film established Pudovkin as one of the major figures of the Soviet cinema. A student of Kuleshov and an admirer of Griffith&rsquo;s films, he was writing his first book of film theory at the same time he was making MOTHER. His expert cutting on movement and his associated editing of unrelated scenes to form what he called a &ldquo;plastic synthesis&rdquo; are amply demonstrated here. Although in direct opposition to Eisenstein&rsquo;s shock montage, Pudovkin used a linkage method advanced far beyond Kuleshov&rsquo;s theories.</p> Saturday, February 02 THE GREATEST http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50407 <p>With Muhammad Ali.<br /><br />For the &ldquo;In-Person Reenactment&rdquo; series, we will be pairing two performances by Muhammad Ali, one in direct style (William Klein&rsquo;s MUHAMMAD ALI, THE GREATEST), the other a dramatized reenactment (Tom Gries&rsquo;s THE GREATEST). Pairing the two works brings Ali&rsquo;s brilliantly improvised verbal riffs even more into relief. Films in which athletes appear as themselves form a strange mini-genre within popular cinema, and unavoidably prove self-reflexive. They provide an extended encounter with their protagonists&rsquo; physical abilities and body image, and encourage scrutiny of aspects of performance that resist theatrical disguise: the effects of age, personal style, gestural idiosyncrasies, and tone of voice. Celebrity biopics also enhance a reflexive awareness of the multiple levels of repetition threading through one&rsquo;s life and body. Invariably, we try to discern being from acting. A typical trope of self-reenacted biopics is the &ldquo;entrance in scene,&rdquo; and Ali reenacts himself from the moment the footage of his fight with Liston has flashed on the screen. The historical record of the passage into celebrity &ndash; his first major win &ndash; is repurposed as a literal threshold for him to enter in scene as himself.</p> Saturday, February 02 SHOW & TELL: DOWN CLAIBORNE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50315 <p><br /><em><strong>Big Chief Kevin Goodman will be here in person with filmmaker Moira Tierney for a Q&amp;A after all 3 screenings!</strong></em><br /><br />One of the most striking aspects of New Orleans&rsquo;s topography is a highway that cuts right through the city, slicing through, among others, the historic 7th Ward. Built in 1968, it dismantled one of the most active Black neighborhoods, which still operates under the shadows of the &ldquo;freeway.&rdquo; The local community reclaims their neighborhood using a variety of tactics: mural painting, represented by the frescoes painted onto the concrete pillars supporting the highway overpass, and collective masking traditions, as evidenced by the Mardi Gras Indians, in the neighborhoods surrounding the highway.<br /><br />These two elements of local culture share an insistence on the importance of history, highlighting its role in the perpetuation of the culture and in the ongoing resistance to its displacement. Their content often overlaps (the highway frescoes reference the Mardi Gras Indians as well as the Maroon tradition of runaway slaves and Native Americans forming independent communities) and both operate within the post-colonial &ldquo;profession of hybridization,&rdquo; as defined by Haitian poet René Depestre.<br /><br />DOWN CLAIBORNE zooms in on the Mississippi and down into the Treme, slides under the highway overpass and moves down Claiborne Avenue from pillar to pillar, building to a celebratory and cathartic climax with the Comanche Hunter and Hard Head Hunter tribes of the Mardi Gras Indians meeting in ceremonial battle on Mardi Gras.<br /><br />&ldquo;I shot on Super 8mm and 16mm silent film, editing in camera as much as possible. I wanted the sound track to add layers of information to the image, without providing an authoritative &lsquo;explanation.&rsquo; It was necessary to fill in the gaps in the official histories and I had the idea of the exchange of information via less linear circuitry. I constructed the &lsquo;scenario&rsquo; as a collage of voices: excerpts from New Orleans radio stations; spoken word (composed for the film by John Lacarbiere III); two jazz tracks contributed by Mario Abney; extracts from archival material or contemporary event listings; songs of the Mardi Gras Indians, courtesy of B.C. Goodman and B.C. Melancon; and the final voice-over, which was recorded impromptu by B.C. Goodman as we watched a cut of the film together.&rdquo; &ndash;Moira Tierney<br /><br /><strong>Advance tickets are now available <a href="https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4055343">here</a>!</strong></p> Saturday, February 02 MUHAMMAD ALI, THE GREATEST (aka FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY, STING LIKE A BEE) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50410 <p>Print courtesy of the Walker Art Center.<br /><br />&ldquo;How to film one of the most explosive figures of the 20th century? If you&rsquo;re William Klein of street photography fame, you brace the camera against the crook of your neck and plunge into the frenzy, aiming right at the boxer&rsquo;s always agape mouth as the refrain, &lsquo;Rumble young man, rumble!&rsquo; blasts out from it. Favoring blistering close-ups, Klein&rsquo;s jazzy chronicle follows &lsquo;The Louisville Lip&rsquo; for a blazing 10-year period starting from the two Sonny Liston fights to &lsquo;The Rumble in the Jungle,&rsquo; his Zaire superfight with George Foreman. Ali was something of a lightning rod for seemingly all the major events of his day &ndash; Vietnam, civil rights, the Beatles &ndash; and it&rsquo;s a credit to Klein&rsquo;s prescience that he put his nose to the ground and sought to capture the zeitgeist, from the rowdy streets of Miami Beach to a Harlem classroom. &lsquo;Who is Muhammad Ali?,&rsquo; Klein records a gentleman asking rhetorically, &lsquo;He is the independent hipster, the jazzman turned boxer!&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;Sean Nam</p> Saturday, February 02 FOUR MEN ON A RAFT + MAN OF ARAN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50413 <p>Orson Welles<br />FOUR MEN ON A RAFT (aka JANGADEIROS)<br />(1942, 46 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />A projected episode in Welles&rsquo;s unfinished IT&rsquo;S ALL TRUE (1942, reconstructed 1993 by Richard Wilson, Myron Meisel, and Bill Krohn), FOUR MEN IN A RAFT illustrates how the real protagonist&rsquo;s body serves as a conduit and extension of an event&rsquo;s original activist impulse. In Welles&rsquo;s film, four fishermen reenact the trip they undertook eight months earlier to request social benefits from the Brazilian Government. They traveled along the northeast coast of Brazil for several weeks in a political mission, stopping along the way to gather support from other fishing communities, before the voyage culminated with their arrival in Rio de Janeiro and a meeting with President Get&uacute;lio Vargas. As Welles was preparing to shoot the first take of the fishermen&rsquo;s arrival in the Guanabara Bay, the raft overturned and the fishermen&rsquo;s leader, Jacar&eacute;<strong>,</strong> drowned. Welles&rsquo;s decision to complete the film with a relative of the dead fisherman raises the question of whether one fisherman&rsquo;s image is as good as another for example&rsquo;s sake. The extreme, almost literal conception of genetic continuity tying the actors to Jacar&eacute; contrasts starkly with the reenactment-logic typical of thirties social documentary, exemplified by Robert Flaherty&rsquo;s MAN OF ARAN (1933).<br />&amp;<br />Robert Flaherty<br />MAN OF ARAN<br />(1934, 76 min, 35mm)<br />For MAN OF ARAN Flaherty composed an onscreen family out of unrelated people of the same ethnic and social group. He freely selected the father, son, and mother, as well as the anecdotes and habits the film would present. For more than half a century, Aran inhabitants had employed paraffin for lighting instead of oil obtained from shark livers. Nevertheless, Flaherty recreated scenes of hunting basking sharks with harpoons &ndash; a practice in disuse for more than fifty years. Flaherty brought a consultant to train islanders, reconstituted their harpoons, and anxiously shot enormous amounts of film. Disregarding present conditions and economic relations, he produced a vision of the Aran islander mired in a romantic notion of men&rsquo;s struggles with the elements.</p> Sunday, February 03 EC: O’NEILL / RICHTER / SHARITS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50182 <p>Pat O&rsquo;Neill<br />SAUGUS SERIES (1974, 19 min, 16mm)&nbsp;<strong><span>New print!</span></strong><br />SAUGUS SERIES is actually seven short films, one-and-a-half to six minutes long, united by a common soundtrack. Each is an evolving &ldquo;still life&rdquo; made up of meticulously assembled but spatially contradictory elements.<br /><br />Hans Richter<br />RHYTHMUS 21 (1921, 3 min, 35mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />&ldquo;Its content is essentially rhythm, the formal vocabulary is elemental geometry, and the structural principle is counterpoint of contrasting opposites.&rdquo; &ndash;Standish Lawder<br /><br />TWO PENNY MAGIC / ZWEIGROSCHENZAUBER (1929, 2 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />Produced as a commercial for a German illustrated magazine, this film is an experiment with visual rhymes.<br /><br />EVERYTHING REVOLVES, EVERYTHING TURNS / ALLES DREHT SICH, ALLES BEWEGT SICH (1929, 9 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />&ldquo;Richter&rsquo;s unique and fascinating view of magic and cruelty in a carnival side-show.&rdquo; &ndash;Cecile Starr<br /><br />Paul Sharits<br />N:O:T:H:I:N:G<br />(1968, 36 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation.)<br />&ldquo;Based in part on the Tibetan Mandala of the Five Dhyani Buddhas/a journey toward the center of pure consciousness (Dharma-Dhatu Wisdom)/space and motion generated rather than illustrated/time-color energy create virtual shape/in negative time, growth is inverse decay.&rdquo; &ndash;Paul Sharits<br /><br />T,O,U,C,H,I,N,G (1969, 12 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />&ldquo;Starring poet David Franks whose voice appears on the soundtrack/an uncutting and unscratching mandala.&rdquo; &ndash;Paul Sharits<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Sunday, February 03 TWENTY YEARS LATER: A MAN MARKED TO DIE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50416 <p>(CABRA MARCADO PARA MORRER)<br /><br />Coutinho&rsquo;s masterpiece rescues a history doubly interrupted by the brutal military coup of 1964 in Brazil: that of Peasant League activism and of Coutinho&rsquo;s project, A MAN MARKED TO DIE, a film that was meant to reenact the story of Agrarian Reform struggles leading to the assassination of the Peasant League leader Jo&atilde;o Pedro Teixeira in 1962. Featuring the leader&rsquo;s widow and their children, as well as people from a similar community, the film was never finished, and the crew had to flee. In 1981, Coutinho set about locating the actors, in order finally to narrate the history of the Peasant League up to 1964. The 1984 film radiates centripetally from the absence at the core of the interrupted film: its dead protagonist, the assassinated leader. Coutinho was haunted for years by the rushes hidden in a suitcase at a friend&rsquo;s. He admitted that the original film patronized and idealized the people but claimed to value the unfinished A MAN MARKED TO DIE precisely because of the participation of the organized rural movement. Besides its inordinate value as a record of a traumatic history, the film marks the passage from an idealized documentary representation to a testimonial, reflexive mode incorporating memory and commentary.</p> Sunday, February 03 SHOW & TELL: DOWN CLAIBORNE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50316 <p><br /><em><strong>Big Chief Kevin Goodman will be here in person with filmmaker Moira Tierney for a Q&amp;A after all 3 screenings!</strong></em><br /><br />One of the most striking aspects of New Orleans&rsquo;s topography is a highway that cuts right through the city, slicing through, among others, the historic 7th Ward. Built in 1968, it dismantled one of the most active Black neighborhoods, which still operates under the shadows of the &ldquo;freeway.&rdquo; The local community reclaims their neighborhood using a variety of tactics: mural painting, represented by the frescoes painted onto the concrete pillars supporting the highway overpass, and collective masking traditions, as evidenced by the Mardi Gras Indians, in the neighborhoods surrounding the highway.<br /><br />These two elements of local culture share an insistence on the importance of history, highlighting its role in the perpetuation of the culture and in the ongoing resistance to its displacement. Their content often overlaps (the highway frescoes reference the Mardi Gras Indians as well as the Maroon tradition of runaway slaves and Native Americans forming independent communities) and both operate within the post-colonial &ldquo;profession of hybridization,&rdquo; as defined by Haitian poet René Depestre.<br /><br />DOWN CLAIBORNE zooms in on the Mississippi and down into the Treme, slides under the highway overpass and moves down Claiborne Avenue from pillar to pillar, building to a celebratory and cathartic climax with the Comanche Hunter and Hard Head Hunter tribes of the Mardi Gras Indians meeting in ceremonial battle on Mardi Gras.<br /><br />&ldquo;I shot on Super 8mm and 16mm silent film, editing in camera as much as possible. I wanted the sound track to add layers of information to the image, without providing an authoritative &lsquo;explanation.&rsquo; It was necessary to fill in the gaps in the official histories and I had the idea of the exchange of information via less linear circuitry. I constructed the &lsquo;scenario&rsquo; as a collage of voices: excerpts from New Orleans radio stations; spoken word (composed for the film by John Lacarbiere III); two jazz tracks contributed by Mario Abney; extracts from archival material or contemporary event listings; songs of the Mardi Gras Indians, courtesy of B.C. Goodman and B.C. Melancon; and the final voice-over, which was recorded impromptu by B.C. Goodman as we watched a cut of the film together.&rdquo; &ndash;Moira Tierney<br /><br /><strong>Advance tickets are now available <a href="https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4055343">here</a>!</strong></p> Sunday, February 03 THE HILLS OF DISORDER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2019#showing-50419 <p>(SERRAS DA DESORDEM)<br /><br />Andrea Tonacci&rsquo;s work spans some of the key moments of Brazilian cinema: he was an exponent of the 1970s Marginal Cinema, an early proponent of handing cameras to indigenous tribes in the 1980s, and ultimately the creator of THE HILLS OF DISORDER, a brilliant allegory on ruptured continuities and cinema&rsquo;s reflexive role in mediating contact between indigenous populations and Brazilian institutions and normative order. Voted the best Brazilian film of the past twenty years, THE HILLS OF DISORDER tells the story of Carapiru, an un-contacted Aw&aacute;-Guaj&aacute; Indian, who reenacts events from twenty to thirty years earlier, including his first contact with nonindigenous Brazilians, after his family group was massacred in 1977. The film mixes news footage with reenacted and documentary scenes from 1988 and 2006, expeditionary films from the 1910s and 20s, as well as an extended montage referencing the &ldquo;Brazilian miracle&rdquo; coinciding with the dictatorship&rsquo;s exploration of the Trans-Amazon highway. The film&rsquo;s hybrid texture, its abrupt shifts between time-periods, black-and-white and color, and various filmic formats, keeps its protagonist Carapiru unanchored, lost in a forest of images. A melodramatic turn of events poignantly drives home the personal side of this violent history of eradication.</p> Sunday, February 03