Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Wed, 16 Aug 2017 23:32:41 -0400 SCUM (theatrical version) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47844 <p>A landmark expos&eacute; of Britain&rsquo;s violent reform schools, SCUM was originally made for TV in 1977. But when the BBC withheld the program from release, due to its intense depictions of suicide, rape, and racism, Clarke defiantly reshot the film as a theatrical feature in 1979, making his attack on the Borstal system even more scathing. Like the TV version, SCUM tells the story of Carlin (Ray Winstone), a new reform school inmate with a reputation as a hard case. The authorities encourage gang leader Pongo (John Blundell) to humble Carlin, but he beats Pongo down and takes over the mantle of Daddy. The guards institute a reign of terror and neglect, with Carlin emerging as an unlikely leader. One of the most important British features of the last 35 years, SCUM is a work whose impact is undimmed.</p> Wednesday, August 16 JACKASS: THE MOVIE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47750 <p>15<sup>TH</sup> ANNIVERSARY SCREENINGS!<br /><br />Coming in the wake of the golden age of skate videos and underground tape trading while anticipating the global explosion of reality television and YouTube Fail videos, JACKASS represents a major epochal body of work, and Jeff Tremaine&rsquo;s big-time motion picture is as perfect an encapsulation &ndash; or introduction &ndash; as one could ask for. JACKASS: THE MOVIE is basically the TV show, but bigger, nastier, and (relatively) uncensored. Before BORAT, the JACKASS crew created a revealing, nuanced portrait of America by simply pointing consumer-grade cameras at themselves (and sometimes unsuspecting loved ones), and their transgressive representation of the body often earnestly recalls maverick video performance artists like Chris Burden and Vito Acconci. The whole thing remains genuinely shocking, disturbing, and hilarious &ndash; and is perhaps to date still the most radical film you could see in a shopping mall. &ndash;Jon Dieringer</p> Wednesday, August 16 JULIEN DONKEY-BOY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47762 <p>Harmony Korine followed his universally reviled debut, GUMMO, with the slightly-less-reviled JULIEN DONKEY-BOY, a more focused family melodrama of shared trauma. Ewen Bremmer is Julien, a schizophrenic protected by his sister (Chlo&euml; Sevigny) from the brutalities of their father, played by Werner Herzog. Julien may be a murderer and in-breeder &ndash; Korine doesn&rsquo;t definitively say &ndash; but he is also a soul in search of love. Korine and Bremmer strip all sentimentality from mental illness, revealing its brute force and fragility. Continuing GUMMO&rsquo;s relentless formal experimentation, JULIEN DONKEY-BOY also introduced Korine the dramatist, capable of Sirkian pitch amid albino rappers, garbage bin wrestlers, and saturated video images every bit as warm as Technicolor. &ndash;Patrick Dahl</p> Wednesday, August 16 THE FIRM - FREE SCREENING! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47850 <p>Written by Al Hunter.<br /><br />&ldquo;THE FIRM was Clarke&rsquo;s last film and in many ways it is one of his most personal: a vicious attack on both Thatcher&rsquo;s Britain &ndash; a regular target for Clarke&rsquo;s ire &ndash; and the hooligan minority who were destroying the reputation of football, a sport he had loved since his childhood. Al Hunter&rsquo;s script focuses on Bexy, the leader of a notorious hooligan &lsquo;firm.&rsquo; Although a nasty and violent individual, Bexy is also charismatic, thanks in no small part to a career-defining performance by Gary Oldman. And it is the ambiguity with which the film treats its protagonists that caused the predictable newspaper panic after its first screening in 1989. Released at a time when Thatcher&rsquo;s government &ndash; openly dismissive of football fans in general &ndash; was pushing for a nationwide football supporters&rsquo; ID card scheme, THE FIRM succinctly demonstrates the futility of this idea, when, in a discussion of the proposed scheme, one of Bexy&rsquo;s gang says, &lsquo;If they stop us at football, we&rsquo;ll just go to boxing or snooker.&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;Justin Hobday, BFI SCREENONLINE</p> Wednesday, August 16 STRANGE DAYS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47799 <p>(D&Iacute;AS EXTRA&Ntilde;OS)<br /><br />U.S. PREMIERE!<br /><br />Juan and Luna, two young Colombians living in the suburbs of Buenos Aires, are infatuated with each other. Their relationship oscillates between tender gestures and violent explosions. But when Luna meets a woman named Federica and brings her home, something changes, setting into crisis the fragile nature of their relationship. Quebrada&rsquo;s auspicious debut feature, shot in a stylized black-and-white, was hailed by Sergio Wolf, former director of the Buenos Aires Independent Film Festival (BAFICI) as &ldquo;one of the best Colombian films in decades.&rdquo;</p> Thursday, August 17 INLAND EMPIRE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47779 <p>David Lynch recently stated that INLAND EMPIRE was his last feature film, and in effect it was a swan song in the making, for it is a movie about movies, specifically about a dying culture for making them &ndash; it bids farewell to the sights and sounds, the indelible texture, of studio genre pictures before the Marvel universe took over. The framework around this interior film is not a film at all &ndash; Lynch shot the entire feature with a humble SONY PD-150, and his use of the medium is brilliant, exploiting blown-out and muddy images, kinetic camera movements, and extreme close-ups to expressive effect. The first feature he shot without a script, it&rsquo;s distinguished by Laura Dern&rsquo;s bravura performance, which strikes every emotional chord. The result is arguably Lynch&rsquo;s greatest achievement, finding freedom in the form of video and television while maintaining the sensorial erotics of cinema. &ndash;Rebecca Cleman</p> Thursday, August 17 JULIEN DONKEY-BOY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47763 <p>Harmony Korine followed his universally reviled debut, GUMMO, with the slightly-less-reviled JULIEN DONKEY-BOY, a more focused family melodrama of shared trauma. Ewen Bremmer is Julien, a schizophrenic protected by his sister (Chlo&euml; Sevigny) from the brutalities of their father, played by Werner Herzog. Julien may be a murderer and in-breeder &ndash; Korine doesn&rsquo;t definitively say &ndash; but he is also a soul in search of love. Korine and Bremmer strip all sentimentality from mental illness, revealing its brute force and fragility. Continuing GUMMO&rsquo;s relentless formal experimentation, JULIEN DONKEY-BOY also introduced Korine the dramatist, capable of Sirkian pitch amid albino rappers, garbage bin wrestlers, and saturated video images every bit as warm as Technicolor. &ndash;Patrick Dahl</p> Friday, August 18 THE SET-UP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47711 <p>A classic noir, THE SET-UP plays to all the sinister impulses of boxing: crooked promoters and backstabbing managers in cahoots with the mob, all venturing to squeeze a few more bucks out of an aging fighter who unwisely clings to the belief that a meritocracy exists in the flesh peddling business. Robert Ryan (who in his youth had reigned as heavyweight champion all four years he studied at Dartmouth) plays creaky heavyweight Bill &ldquo;Stoker&rdquo; Thompson. His manager arranges a deal with the mob to have Thompson &ldquo;take a dive.&rdquo; When he eventually learns of his manager&rsquo;s dirty dealing, he must quickly make a choice with no good outcomes: kowtow to the capos and live with the fact that he is another palooka, or fight on in the hopes of snatching that last bit of dignity from a sport that never gave much in return. Tense, efficient, and pitch-perfect, THE SET-UP is one of Wise&rsquo;s most meticulously crafted films &ndash; a vision of boxing, and of life, that offers only the bleakest alternatives.<br /><br /><em><strong>Steve Farhood, Boxing Hall of Fame analyst and journalist, will be here in person to introduce the screening on Friday, August 18!</strong></em></p> Friday, August 18 FAT CITY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47715 <p>That old studio lion John Huston was a perfect fit to adapt Leonard Gardner&rsquo;s novel about down-and-out boxers hanging out in Skid Row in Stockton, CA: he knew the milieu, having boxed himself as a teenager and even amassed a lightweight amateur record of 23-2; and he had a long track record for empathizing &ndash; perhaps to a fault &ndash; with losers and misfits. FAT CITY focuses on the relationship between former prizefighter and alcoholic Billy Tully (Stacy Keach, who was trained by middleweight champion Jose Torres for the film) and young and impressionable Ernie Munger (Jeff Bridges), who Tully determines to mold into the fighter he failed to become himself. FAT CITY peers harrowingly into the lives of gimlet-eyed no-hopers long past their prime. But it&rsquo;s in its evocative conjuring of place (via cinematographer Conrad Hall) that FAT CITY distinguishes itself from its boxing film peers. That Huston rounds out the cast with actual former prizefighters suggests the attention to detail that helps the film achieve its gritty and accurate realism.<br /><br /><em><strong>Steve Farhood, Boxing Hall of Fame analyst and journalist, will be here in person to introduce the screening on Friday, August 18!</strong></em></p> Friday, August 18 BAMBOOZLED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47776 <p>Spike Lee&rsquo;s most righteous film wages scorched-earth warfare against an Entertainment Industrial Complex undergirded by its appropriation of &ldquo;blackness.&rdquo; Under network pressure, Damon Wayans&rsquo;s token television producer pitches a satire of black stereotypes as a &ldquo;New Millennium Minstrel Show.&rdquo; The show takes off, its satiric ambitions made hollow as audiences white and black eagerly devour images of grease-painted coonery. Savion Glover and Tommy Davidson play the tap-dancing stars of the show, forced to weigh moral complicity against the spoils of stardom. Featuring beautifully muted images, courtesy of director of photography Ellen Kuras, and shattering montages culled from the torturous history of black representation, BAMBOOZLED may be Lee&rsquo;s definitive statement on race in America.&rdquo; &ndash;Patrick Dahl</p> Friday, August 18 CONTACT - FREE SCREENING! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47816 <p>Written by AFN Clarke.<br /><br />&ldquo;CONTACT is a war film that might have been made by Anthony Mann in its depiction of a platoon of English soldiers patrolling the border between Northern and Southern Ireland. There are no real characters (though Sean Chapman is riveting as the demoralized officer), and very little talk. Instead, we see the implacable prowling in idyllic terrain, searching for guns, trouble, or mines. It is as if the &ldquo;Irish problem&rdquo; had been filmed by a shell-shocked bird in a blasted tree, equipped with infrared night-sight vision.&rdquo; &ndash;David Thomson</p> Saturday, August 19 COLOSSAL YOUTH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47753 <p>COLOSSAL YOUTH is the final film in Pedro Costa&rsquo;s loose &ldquo;Fountainhas trilogy,&rdquo; for which he worked with and documented the inhabitants of a since-demolished slum on the outskirts of Lisbon. Like much of his work, it&rsquo;s wandering and contradictory. Costa takes cues from Straub/Huillet and political cinema, but also makes grand gestures towards the later John Ford pictures, Jacques Tourneur, and the transcendental stylistics of Ozu and Dreyer. COLOSSAL YOUTH is a perfect example of the type of cinema only possible with digital video &ndash; the film&rsquo;s actor, Ventura, dictated much of the film&rsquo;s form, Costa worked with an on-set crew of only two or three people, and the shooting ratio was allegedly nearly 200:1. &ndash;Tyler Maxin</p> Saturday, August 19 ON THE ROPES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47719 <p>&ldquo;ON THE ROPES follows the lives of a weatherworn Brooklyn trainer, Harry Keitt, and three of his fighters &ndash; Tyrene Manson, George Walton, and Noel Santiago &ndash; over a span of two tumultuous years. Filmed long before gentrification struck Bed-Stuy, it is set mostly against a high-rise background of housing projects, graffiti-scrawled bodegas, courtrooms, and, naturally, the dingy confines of the New Bed-Stuy Boxing Gym. In the most riveting moment, Manson, arrested on trumped-up drug charges, is sentenced to prison on the day of her Golden Gloves matchup; instead of donning a pair of Everlasts in the ring, she wears a set of handcuffs out of the courtroom. Against her biggest opponent &ndash; a catastrophic criminal justice system &ndash; Manson is helpless; and her defiance, which served her so well in the ring and in battling the bleak circumstances of her life, backfires on the witness stand. While ON THE ROPES bears comparison to HOOSIERS, it should be noted that basketball is no match for boxing as an instrument of false hope. A largely unregulated pursuit with lawless roots, boxing remains a moral wasteland on the fringes of the collective sporting psyche. Its promise of self-invention is, for most, little more than a painful mirage.&rdquo; &ndash;Carlos Acevedo</p> Saturday, August 19 DANCER IN THE DARK http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47767 <p>The combination of handheld, close-up-heavy DV cinematography and pop icon Bj&ouml;rk&rsquo;s original score and breakout performance makes DANCER IN THE DARK one dispiriting elixir. As Selma, Bj&ouml;rk shines as a Czech immigrant struggling to maintain her unflagging optimism against failing eyesight, financial crises, and single motherhood in a small, postwar industrial town. The resulting film earned a Palme d&rsquo;Or for Von Trier, an Oscar nomination for Bj&ouml;rk, and considerable controversy upon release. Ostensibly a period piece, the natively digital look gives the story, and film, a perpetually transitional feeling. Like its protagonist, DANCER keeps one foot in the past, one in the present, and its weary sights on an uncertain future. &ndash;Caroline Golum</p> Saturday, August 19 GENTLEMAN JIM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47722 <p>When Errol Flynn took the role of 19<sup>th</sup>-century banker-turned-prizefighter &ldquo;Gentleman&rdquo; James J. Corbett, he was, to say the least, no longer in his prime. But this didn&rsquo;t stop him from exerting himself to the fullest during the intricate boxing scenes, leading to a mild on-set heart attack. Corbett was famous for popularizing the modern elements of prizefighting &ndash; the Queensbury rules, with three-minutes rounds separated by one-minute breaks. His hopscotch footwork, paired with his blue-blood mannerisms, made him a bona fide celebrity in an age before mass media. Flynn was right at home in the role, and his athletic performance is no trick of the eye &ndash; he was a skilled amateur boxer. In an effort to duplicate Corbett&rsquo;s famed footwork, Flynn enlisted the help of Mushy Callahan, a former light-welterweight champion and trainer to many Hollywood stars. The film&rsquo;s final fight scene bears the evidence of Flynn&rsquo;s hard work as Corbett puts on a boxing clinic against the crude Sullivan.<br /><br /><em><strong>Film critic Nicholas Elliott will introduce the screening of GENTLEMAN JIM on Friday, August 25!</strong></em></p> Saturday, August 19 THE FIGHT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47725 <p>When it comes to Muhammad Ali, biographical books and films alike tend towards hagiography. William Greaves takes a more disinterested, barebones approach in THE FIGHT, which follows all the proceedings leading up to and after the first Ali-Joe Frazier fight, one of the greatest of all sports spectacles. In documenting so many different aspects of the fight, from the behind-closed-doors business dealings to the vested fans on the street, Greaves offers a stirring portrait of prizefighting. But what makes THE FIGHT perhaps the most distinctive Ali documentary is Greaves&rsquo;s decision to present the entire fight unadorned. Per Richard Brody: &ldquo;The movie shows all fifteen three-minute-long rounds, forty-five minutes in all, punctuated between rounds only by snippets of action in the fighters&rsquo; corners or in the audience. Filmed with an analytical expertness and a devout attention to the continuity of action in long takes at discerning angles, the fight is also presented in its existential purity &ndash; there&rsquo;s no television-style commentary accompanying it, no music added, no slow-motion or instant replay, nothing but the live sound of the fight and the crowd. For a little more than forty-five minutes, you are there.&rdquo;</p> Saturday, August 19 24 HOUR PARTY PEOPLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47756 <p>24 HOUR PARTY PEOPLE follows frustrated TV reporter Tony Wilson through the creation and collapse of Factory Records, one of the most influential, least profitable labels in music history, home to acts such as Joy Division and the Happy Mondays. Starting with the spark of a sparsely attended Sex Pistols show, the film plows through Manchester, England&rsquo;s music scenes, foregoing history for a giddy sense of being there. A full Richard Lester playbook of fourth-wall asides, non-sequitur callbacks, and self-aware references are deployed, with the insubordinate glee extending to director Winterbottom and DP M&uuml;ller&rsquo;s choice to shoot on MiniDV (at the time the theatrical release equivalent of a middle finger). Aside from making interiors look great and exteriors (where the music wasn&rsquo;t) look pixilated and miserable, DV gave them freedom to focus on performance, and the realistic looseness shows up other biopics&rsquo; forced cool. &ndash;Danielle Burgos</p> Saturday, August 19 ROAD - FREE SCREENING! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47847 <p>Written by Jim Cartwright.<br /><br />ROAD is an adaptation of Jim Cartwright&rsquo;s stage play, which comprised a series of interconnected glimpses into the lives of the residents of a single street in an unnamed Lancashire town over the course of a single evening. Though the original play &ndash; consisting largely of soliloquies and very little action &ndash; might not have seemed a natural for cinematic adaptation, Clarke transformed it into another of his Steadicam-saturated masterpieces (which to Clarke aficionados have come to be known as his &ldquo;walking films&rdquo;). Freely mixing effects both patently cinematic and patently theatrical &ndash; the constantly roving camera on the one hand, and occasional direct-to-camera soliloquies on the other &ndash; ROAD is a typically shattering depiction of the tragic consequences of social and economic stagnation.</p> Sunday, August 20 BAMBOOZLED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47777 <p>Spike Lee&rsquo;s most righteous film wages scorched-earth warfare against an Entertainment Industrial Complex undergirded by its appropriation of &ldquo;blackness.&rdquo; Under network pressure, Damon Wayans&rsquo;s token television producer pitches a satire of black stereotypes as a &ldquo;New Millennium Minstrel Show.&rdquo; The show takes off, its satiric ambitions made hollow as audiences white and black eagerly devour images of grease-painted coonery. Savion Glover and Tommy Davidson play the tap-dancing stars of the show, forced to weigh moral complicity against the spoils of stardom. Featuring beautifully muted images, courtesy of director of photography Ellen Kuras, and shattering montages culled from the torturous history of black representation, BAMBOOZLED may be Lee&rsquo;s definitive statement on race in America.&rdquo; &ndash;Patrick Dahl</p> Sunday, August 20 RAGING BULL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47729 <p>In her autobiography, Vicki LaMotta shares one of the entries in the diary her husband kept in his last days as a credible prizefighter: &ldquo;Ate bad, drank bad, gained eight pounds in one day.&rdquo; Indeed, Jake LaMotta, one of the top middleweights of the 1940s and 50s, led nothing if not a life dictated by sheer excess &ndash; of both mind and body. Scorsese&rsquo;s biopic of the &ldquo;Bronx Bull&rdquo; opens to the lilting, plangent notes of Pietro Mascagni&rsquo;s Intermezzo, as a hooded LaMotta (De Niro) is captured shadowboxing in a ring in slow motion. The stylized introduction suggests that the film will be nothing less than a poetic reimagining of prizefighting. In many respects, though, there is nothing poetic about LaMotta. He is a relentless brawler, an entertainer in the ring with a scary habit for self-abandon &ndash; who, as the saying goes, will take two punches to land one. But LaMotta&rsquo;s life at the top of the boxing food chain starts to crack when he finds himself unable to keep his emotions in check in real life. The career comes to a close, and ultimately the boxer sits bloated, reciting the words of Budd Schulberg&rsquo;s Terry Malloy: &ldquo;I could&rsquo;ve been a contender. I could&rsquo;ve been somebody, instead of a bum which is what I am.&rdquo; The boxer, then, as redeemed sinner.</p> Sunday, August 20 THE FOREST FOR THE TREES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47782 <p>Before the comparatively sprawling TONI ERDMANN, Maren Ade debuted with this awkward and hilarious portrayal of a young woman adjusting to an unfamiliar milieu. Eva L&ouml;bau is a 27-year-old who moves from the country to a small city to become a teacher. Once there, she finds herself unable to control her unruly students, undermined by her colleagues, and at a loss to make friends. She begins spending time with a neighbor, but her indiscrete amateur voyeurism throws a monkey-wrench into their budding association. Like TONI ERDMANN, Ade based FOREST on stories shared by her own parents, and it similarly comes across as a tender, personal, and sometimes painfully relatable film. &ndash;Jon Dieringer</p> Sunday, August 20 BOXING GYM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47733 <p>Named after its rattail-sporting owner Richard Lord, a former amateur standout and professional, Lord&rsquo;s Gym in Austin, Texas, isn&rsquo;t so distinctive that you couldn&rsquo;t find its like scattered across the country, in cities as far flung as Choctaw and Salinas. And that &ndash; the gym&rsquo;s quotidian nature &ndash; is why Frederick Wiseman, one imagines, decided to settle on Lord&rsquo;s as the stand-in for an entire ecosystem, which in its diversity of people and fundamental sense of equality, mirrors something like America&rsquo;s ideal vision of itself: a glorious melting pot. One thing the ROCKY movies got right is that the idea of self-improvement remains as attractive as anything else in the pantheon of human ideals. With editing that rhymes with the percussive sounds and swift movements in the gym, BOXING GYM offers a vision of beauty only possible in a diverse social order, even if it might be closer to utopia than reality.</p> Sunday, August 20 INLAND EMPIRE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47780 <p>David Lynch recently stated that INLAND EMPIRE was his last feature film, and in effect it was a swan song in the making, for it is a movie about movies, specifically about a dying culture for making them &ndash; it bids farewell to the sights and sounds, the indelible texture, of studio genre pictures before the Marvel universe took over. The framework around this interior film is not a film at all &ndash; Lynch shot the entire feature with a humble SONY PD-150, and his use of the medium is brilliant, exploiting blown-out and muddy images, kinetic camera movements, and extreme close-ups to expressive effect. The first feature he shot without a script, it&rsquo;s distinguished by Laura Dern&rsquo;s bravura performance, which strikes every emotional chord. The result is arguably Lynch&rsquo;s greatest achievement, finding freedom in the form of video and television while maintaining the sensorial erotics of cinema. &ndash;Rebecca Cleman</p> Sunday, August 20 THE BOXER AND DEATH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47736 <p>(BOXER A SMRŤ)<br /><br />Two fists and a tucked-in chin: that&rsquo;s all you take inside a ring. It&rsquo;s little surprise then that boxing, a sport that requires no fancy gear and courts death, finds itself the subject of this Nazi concentration camp film. Here, boxing is the great equalizer. As a former boxer, camp inmate Jan Kominek earns the goodwill of the camp&rsquo;s commandant, Kraft. A former boxer himself, Kraft is in search of a sparring partner who might curb the onset of ennui and prepare him for a postwar boxing life, and so he makes Kominek his hobby. Thus a moral quandary is born: how does Kominek reconcile his privilege in the face of sure death? Solan sticks to the master-servant drama between Kraft and Kominek, but the horrors of the camps, while unseen, are constantly implied to devastating effect.</p> Sunday, August 20 THE GLEANERS & I http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47759 <p>Shot with a tiny crew (made up of only herself at times), Varda&rsquo;s documentary captures themes of waste, consumption, and poverty with the filmmaker&rsquo;s singular warmth and curiosity. Gleaning, the act of collecting what is left behind or discarded, takes on a different tone depending on the context that Varda chooses to document &ndash; from heaps of potatoes in the countryside and dumpsters of the urban landscape, to the recycled bits of material used in art, and even, as the title suggests, the process of filmmaking with which Varda engages. What remains constant is Varda&rsquo;s dedication to sharing the practices of her subjects in an attentive and considered way. The result is a drifting visual essay that explores the tensions between those who must stoop and gather in order to survive and those who gather to create. &ndash;Brittany Stigler</p> Monday, August 21 THE MILKY WAY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47740 <p>Preservation print courtesy of the UCLA Film &amp; Television Archive.<br /><br />Though the bulk of Leo McCarey&rsquo;s early education in filmmaking and comedy came from his stint at the Hal Roach Studio, his penchant for theatrics is perhaps inborn: McCarey&rsquo;s father was none other than the fight impresario, &ldquo;Uncle Tom&rdquo; McCarey, who at the turn-of-the-century helped transform L.A. into a prizefighting destination. Prizefighting is nothing if not a realm of show business that relies heavily on the canny, relentless art of promotion, a point that McCarey elaborates to great effect in THE MILKY WAY. Buleigh Sullivan (Harold Lloyd) is a meek, bespectacled milk delivery man on one of his nightly rounds, when a chance confrontation with a sloshed tough, Speed McFarland, lands him on the following morning&rsquo;s front page news: &ldquo;Truck Driver Knocks Out Champion&rdquo; &ndash; that is, the middleweight champion of the world. So starts an unassuming milkman&rsquo;s boxing career. McCarey hews to techniques defined by his silent film roots, eschewing close-ups and flashy cutting in favor of a camera that sits back to capture the bodies in concert with each other, one pratfall after the other.</p> Monday, August 21 TEN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47770 <p>Kiarostami&rsquo;s 2002 film takes advantage of the unique qualities of DV &ndash; its inconspicuousness and portability, and the ability to film in long takes &ndash; to create one of cinema&rsquo;s most intimate and profound dramas. TEN details a woman&rsquo;s ten encounters in the front seat of her car with a collection of passengers, including her increasingly hostile young son, a prostitute, a distraught young woman, and an aged stranger, on her way to pray at a local mausoleum. Kiarostami&rsquo;s film is both a drama with unparalleled specificity and raw emotional access, as well as a larger, shattering statement on love, personal freedom, and the struggle for women to control their own destinies. Using only the barest of scenarios, cast, and equipment, Kiarostami succeeds in creating a masterpiece of angst, rage, love, and despair. &ndash;Chris Shields</p> Monday, August 21 ON THE ROPES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47720 <p>&ldquo;ON THE ROPES follows the lives of a weatherworn Brooklyn trainer, Harry Keitt, and three of his fighters &ndash; Tyrene Manson, George Walton, and Noel Santiago &ndash; over a span of two tumultuous years. Filmed long before gentrification struck Bed-Stuy, it is set mostly against a high-rise background of housing projects, graffiti-scrawled bodegas, courtrooms, and, naturally, the dingy confines of the New Bed-Stuy Boxing Gym. In the most riveting moment, Manson, arrested on trumped-up drug charges, is sentenced to prison on the day of her Golden Gloves matchup; instead of donning a pair of Everlasts in the ring, she wears a set of handcuffs out of the courtroom. Against her biggest opponent &ndash; a catastrophic criminal justice system &ndash; Manson is helpless; and her defiance, which served her so well in the ring and in battling the bleak circumstances of her life, backfires on the witness stand. While ON THE ROPES bears comparison to HOOSIERS, it should be noted that basketball is no match for boxing as an instrument of false hope. A largely unregulated pursuit with lawless roots, boxing remains a moral wasteland on the fringes of the collective sporting psyche. Its promise of self-invention is, for most, little more than a painful mirage.&rdquo; &ndash;Carlos Acevedo</p> Monday, August 21 FAT CITY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47716 <p>That old studio lion John Huston was a perfect fit to adapt Leonard Gardner&rsquo;s novel about down-and-out boxers hanging out in Skid Row in Stockton, CA: he knew the milieu, having boxed himself as a teenager and even amassed a lightweight amateur record of 23-2; and he had a long track record for empathizing &ndash; perhaps to a fault &ndash; with losers and misfits. FAT CITY focuses on the relationship between former prizefighter and alcoholic Billy Tully (Stacy Keach, who was trained by middleweight champion Jose Torres for the film) and young and impressionable Ernie Munger (Jeff Bridges), who Tully determines to mold into the fighter he failed to become himself. FAT CITY peers harrowingly into the lives of gimlet-eyed no-hopers long past their prime. But it&rsquo;s in its evocative conjuring of place (via cinematographer Conrad Hall) that FAT CITY distinguishes itself from its boxing film peers. That Huston rounds out the cast with actual former prizefighters suggests the attention to detail that helps the film achieve its gritty and accurate realism.<br /><br /><em><strong>Steve Farhood, Boxing Hall of Fame analyst and journalist, will be here in person to introduce the screening on Friday, August 18!</strong></em></p> Tuesday, August 22 THE FOREST FOR THE TREES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47783 <p>Before the comparatively sprawling TONI ERDMANN, Maren Ade debuted with this awkward and hilarious portrayal of a young woman adjusting to an unfamiliar milieu. Eva L&ouml;bau is a 27-year-old who moves from the country to a small city to become a teacher. Once there, she finds herself unable to control her unruly students, undermined by her colleagues, and at a loss to make friends. She begins spending time with a neighbor, but her indiscrete amateur voyeurism throws a monkey-wrench into their budding association. Like TONI ERDMANN, Ade based FOREST on stories shared by her own parents, and it similarly comes across as a tender, personal, and sometimes painfully relatable film. &ndash;Jon Dieringer</p> Tuesday, August 22 CHUCK & BUCK http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47773 <p>It&rsquo;s easy to imagine CHUCK &amp; BUCK as a great unproduced screenplay. Thankfully, encouraged into production by the DV ethos of THE CELEBRATION, writer-star Mike White&rsquo;s script about a man-child&rsquo;s enduring, perverse infatuation with a childhood friend became one of the finest independent films of its era. After the death of his mother, Buck O&rsquo;Brien (White) attempts to reconnect with his old pal Chuck &ndash; now &ldquo;Charlie,&rdquo; a successful record executive (Chris Weitz). It becomes apparent that Buck has remained fixated on an episode of adolescent sexual experimentation that newlywed Charlie has repressed and largely moved on from. Undaunted by Charlie&rsquo;s cold shoulder, Buck sells his possessions, moves to LA, and obsessively stages a play to reach out to the Chuck he still loves. Under Miguel Arteta&rsquo;s direction, the tone veers between earnest, endearing, and abjectly creepy &ndash; sort of a twee TAXI DRIVER transplanted to LA. &ndash;Jon Dieringer</p> Tuesday, August 22 THE SET-UP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47712 <p>A classic noir, THE SET-UP plays to all the sinister impulses of boxing: crooked promoters and backstabbing managers in cahoots with the mob, all venturing to squeeze a few more bucks out of an aging fighter who unwisely clings to the belief that a meritocracy exists in the flesh peddling business. Robert Ryan (who in his youth had reigned as heavyweight champion all four years he studied at Dartmouth) plays creaky heavyweight Bill &ldquo;Stoker&rdquo; Thompson. His manager arranges a deal with the mob to have Thompson &ldquo;take a dive.&rdquo; When he eventually learns of his manager&rsquo;s dirty dealing, he must quickly make a choice with no good outcomes: kowtow to the capos and live with the fact that he is another palooka, or fight on in the hopes of snatching that last bit of dignity from a sport that never gave much in return. Tense, efficient, and pitch-perfect, THE SET-UP is one of Wise&rsquo;s most meticulously crafted films &ndash; a vision of boxing, and of life, that offers only the bleakest alternatives.<br /><br /><em><strong>Steve Farhood, Boxing Hall of Fame analyst and journalist, will be here in person to introduce the screening on Friday, August 18!</strong></em></p> Tuesday, August 22 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47792 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, August 23 RAGING BULL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47730 <p>In her autobiography, Vicki LaMotta shares one of the entries in the diary her husband kept in his last days as a credible prizefighter: &ldquo;Ate bad, drank bad, gained eight pounds in one day.&rdquo; Indeed, Jake LaMotta, one of the top middleweights of the 1940s and 50s, led nothing if not a life dictated by sheer excess &ndash; of both mind and body. Scorsese&rsquo;s biopic of the &ldquo;Bronx Bull&rdquo; opens to the lilting, plangent notes of Pietro Mascagni&rsquo;s Intermezzo, as a hooded LaMotta (De Niro) is captured shadowboxing in a ring in slow motion. The stylized introduction suggests that the film will be nothing less than a poetic reimagining of prizefighting. In many respects, though, there is nothing poetic about LaMotta. He is a relentless brawler, an entertainer in the ring with a scary habit for self-abandon &ndash; who, as the saying goes, will take two punches to land one. But LaMotta&rsquo;s life at the top of the boxing food chain starts to crack when he finds himself unable to keep his emotions in check in real life. The career comes to a close, and ultimately the boxer sits bloated, reciting the words of Budd Schulberg&rsquo;s Terry Malloy: &ldquo;I could&rsquo;ve been a contender. I could&rsquo;ve been somebody, instead of a bum which is what I am.&rdquo; The boxer, then, as redeemed sinner.</p> Wednesday, August 23 FAT CITY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47717 <p>That old studio lion John Huston was a perfect fit to adapt Leonard Gardner&rsquo;s novel about down-and-out boxers hanging out in Skid Row in Stockton, CA: he knew the milieu, having boxed himself as a teenager and even amassed a lightweight amateur record of 23-2; and he had a long track record for empathizing &ndash; perhaps to a fault &ndash; with losers and misfits. FAT CITY focuses on the relationship between former prizefighter and alcoholic Billy Tully (Stacy Keach, who was trained by middleweight champion Jose Torres for the film) and young and impressionable Ernie Munger (Jeff Bridges), who Tully determines to mold into the fighter he failed to become himself. FAT CITY peers harrowingly into the lives of gimlet-eyed no-hopers long past their prime. But it&rsquo;s in its evocative conjuring of place (via cinematographer Conrad Hall) that FAT CITY distinguishes itself from its boxing film peers. That Huston rounds out the cast with actual former prizefighters suggests the attention to detail that helps the film achieve its gritty and accurate realism.<br /><br /><em><strong>Steve Farhood, Boxing Hall of Fame analyst and journalist, will be here in person to introduce the screening on Friday, August 18!</strong></em></p> Wednesday, August 23 THE SET-UP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47713 <p>A classic noir, THE SET-UP plays to all the sinister impulses of boxing: crooked promoters and backstabbing managers in cahoots with the mob, all venturing to squeeze a few more bucks out of an aging fighter who unwisely clings to the belief that a meritocracy exists in the flesh peddling business. Robert Ryan (who in his youth had reigned as heavyweight champion all four years he studied at Dartmouth) plays creaky heavyweight Bill &ldquo;Stoker&rdquo; Thompson. His manager arranges a deal with the mob to have Thompson &ldquo;take a dive.&rdquo; When he eventually learns of his manager&rsquo;s dirty dealing, he must quickly make a choice with no good outcomes: kowtow to the capos and live with the fact that he is another palooka, or fight on in the hopes of snatching that last bit of dignity from a sport that never gave much in return. Tense, efficient, and pitch-perfect, THE SET-UP is one of Wise&rsquo;s most meticulously crafted films &ndash; a vision of boxing, and of life, that offers only the bleakest alternatives.<br /><br /><em><strong>Steve Farhood, Boxing Hall of Fame analyst and journalist, will be here in person to introduce the screening on Friday, August 18!</strong></em></p> Thursday, August 24 CINEMA NOVO http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47788 <p>Distributed by Icarus Films.<br /><br />The new film by Eryk Rocha &ndash; son of legendary Brazilian filmmaker Glauber Rocha, and an accomplished filmmaker in his own right &ndash; CINEMA NOVO is a tribute to the eponymous movement that transformed Brazilian (and Latin American) cinema in the 1960s and 70s, and justifiably exploded onto the international scene. More a poetic essay than a straightforward documentary chronicle, it explores the Cinema Novo movement entirely through the recorded testimony of its key auteurs and through collaged fragments of their work. Rarely identifying the excerpts it includes, CINEMA NOVO mobilizes the visual legacy of these films to enter into the spirit of the movement and the time, immersing us in the creative adventure of a generation of filmmakers who invented a way to make cinema in Brazil &ndash; with a political attitude, combining art and revolution.<br /><br />&ldquo;If ever a first-time movie-essayist appreciated the value of using his subject and its guiding forces as a mechanism to explain it, it&rsquo;s Eryk Rocha. [&hellip;] With cine-essays a narrow field, comparisons will be made to Chris Marker&rsquo;s poetic combinations of image and sound, as well as Mark Cousins&rsquo; method of dissecting film theory, and they&rsquo;re warranted. [&hellip;] If only all primers on important chapters in film history could be this evocative.&rdquo; &ndash;Sarah Ward, SCREEN DAILY<br /><br />Please note: these screenings bookend a retrospective devoted to the work of Cinema Novo filmmaker Joaquim Pedro de Andrade, taking place August 25-31.</p> Thursday, August 24 THE FIGHT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47726 <p>When it comes to Muhammad Ali, biographical books and films alike tend towards hagiography. William Greaves takes a more disinterested, barebones approach in THE FIGHT, which follows all the proceedings leading up to and after the first Ali-Joe Frazier fight, one of the greatest of all sports spectacles. In documenting so many different aspects of the fight, from the behind-closed-doors business dealings to the vested fans on the street, Greaves offers a stirring portrait of prizefighting. But what makes THE FIGHT perhaps the most distinctive Ali documentary is Greaves&rsquo;s decision to present the entire fight unadorned. Per Richard Brody: &ldquo;The movie shows all fifteen three-minute-long rounds, forty-five minutes in all, punctuated between rounds only by snippets of action in the fighters&rsquo; corners or in the audience. Filmed with an analytical expertness and a devout attention to the continuity of action in long takes at discerning angles, the fight is also presented in its existential purity &ndash; there&rsquo;s no television-style commentary accompanying it, no music added, no slow-motion or instant replay, nothing but the live sound of the fight and the crowd. For a little more than forty-five minutes, you are there.&rdquo;</p> Thursday, August 24 THE BOXER AND DEATH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47737 <p>(BOXER A SMRŤ)<br /><br />Two fists and a tucked-in chin: that&rsquo;s all you take inside a ring. It&rsquo;s little surprise then that boxing, a sport that requires no fancy gear and courts death, finds itself the subject of this Nazi concentration camp film. Here, boxing is the great equalizer. As a former boxer, camp inmate Jan Kominek earns the goodwill of the camp&rsquo;s commandant, Kraft. A former boxer himself, Kraft is in search of a sparring partner who might curb the onset of ennui and prepare him for a postwar boxing life, and so he makes Kominek his hobby. Thus a moral quandary is born: how does Kominek reconcile his privilege in the face of sure death? Solan sticks to the master-servant drama between Kraft and Kominek, but the horrors of the camps, while unseen, are constantly implied to devastating effect.</p> Friday, August 25 THE PRIEST AND THE GIRL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47853 <p>(O PADRE E A MO&Ccedil;A)<br /><br />Shot in a small village in the province of Minas Gerais, Andrade&rsquo;s first full-fledged feature film calls to mind Robert Bresson in its formal austerity, severe black-and-white cinematography, and religious milieu. The film&rsquo;s protagonist is a young priest who arrives in the village to replace his dying predecessor. He befriends the young and beautiful Mariana, only to discover that she&rsquo;s enmeshed in an incestuous relationship with one of the town&rsquo;s most prominent residents. In his attempts to save Mariana, he has to contend not only with the villagers&rsquo; moral narrow-mindedness but with his own internal struggle between love for the girl and the strictures of his faith. In telling this story, Andrade draws parallels between the townspeople&rsquo;s blind adherence to social, moral, and political conventions, and the state of Brazilian society as a whole.</p> Friday, August 25 MACUNAÍMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47857 <p>Widely considered one of the most influential works of Cinema Novo, MACUNA&Iacute;MA is a hilariously biting adaptation of Mario de Andrade&rsquo;s eponymous novel, itself a canonical text of early Brazilian modernism. Published in 1928, it tells the story of &ldquo;a hero without a character,&rdquo; the son of a native Indian who is born black, spends the first six years of his life without uttering a word (due to &ldquo;laziness&rdquo;), and turns white before venturing into the capitalist jungle of S&atilde;o Paulo. In the filmic version of the story, the main character is very much an ordinary man, and the only magical elements that remain are his transformation into a white man and Macuna&iacute;ma&rsquo;s use of macumba &ndash; an Afro-Brazilian religion that mixes sorcery and ritual dance. The protagonist is played first by Grande Otelo (black Macuna&iacute;ma) and then by Paulo Jos&eacute; (white Macuna&iacute;ma), two of Brazil&rsquo;s most celebrated actors. As Macuna&iacute;ma ventures into S&atilde;o Paulo, he falls in love with Ci (Dina Sfat), fathers a black son (also played by Otelo), and is co-opted by terrorists who enlist him in their schemes &ndash; all the while encountering Brazilian folk legends and orix&aacute;s along the way.</p> Friday, August 25 GENTLEMAN JIM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47723 <p>When Errol Flynn took the role of 19<sup>th</sup>-century banker-turned-prizefighter &ldquo;Gentleman&rdquo; James J. Corbett, he was, to say the least, no longer in his prime. But this didn&rsquo;t stop him from exerting himself to the fullest during the intricate boxing scenes, leading to a mild on-set heart attack. Corbett was famous for popularizing the modern elements of prizefighting &ndash; the Queensbury rules, with three-minutes rounds separated by one-minute breaks. His hopscotch footwork, paired with his blue-blood mannerisms, made him a bona fide celebrity in an age before mass media. Flynn was right at home in the role, and his athletic performance is no trick of the eye &ndash; he was a skilled amateur boxer. In an effort to duplicate Corbett&rsquo;s famed footwork, Flynn enlisted the help of Mushy Callahan, a former light-welterweight champion and trainer to many Hollywood stars. The film&rsquo;s final fight scene bears the evidence of Flynn&rsquo;s hard work as Corbett puts on a boxing clinic against the crude Sullivan.<br /><br /><em><strong>Film critic Nicholas Elliott will introduce the screening of GENTLEMAN JIM on Friday, August 25!</strong></em></p> Friday, August 25 GARRINCHA: HERO OF THE JUNGLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47861 <p>(GARRINCHA, ALEGRIA DO POVO)<br /><br />&ldquo;Andrade&rsquo;s feature debut, GARRINCHA is a documentary portrait of a celebrated soccer player who owes his wondrous abilities to his peculiar physiology &ndash; one of his legs is bent inward and the other curves outward. Moving in strange ways, with broken rhythms, the film is divided into roughly three sections: a celebration of soccer itself, weaving moving images and stills into a stream of impressions that at times verges on abstraction; a direct-cinema style look at Garrincha&rsquo;s daily life and his celebrity; and a study of the player&rsquo;s performance in Brazil&rsquo;s back-to-back World Cup final wins, with Garrincha upstaged by star striker Pel&eacute; in 1958 and stricken with fever and blending in with his teammates in 1962 &ndash; another hero swallowed up. [&hellip;] One of the greatest films ever made about soccer.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Saturday, August 26 THE FIGHT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47727 <p>When it comes to Muhammad Ali, biographical books and films alike tend towards hagiography. William Greaves takes a more disinterested, barebones approach in THE FIGHT, which follows all the proceedings leading up to and after the first Ali-Joe Frazier fight, one of the greatest of all sports spectacles. In documenting so many different aspects of the fight, from the behind-closed-doors business dealings to the vested fans on the street, Greaves offers a stirring portrait of prizefighting. But what makes THE FIGHT perhaps the most distinctive Ali documentary is Greaves&rsquo;s decision to present the entire fight unadorned. Per Richard Brody: &ldquo;The movie shows all fifteen three-minute-long rounds, forty-five minutes in all, punctuated between rounds only by snippets of action in the fighters&rsquo; corners or in the audience. Filmed with an analytical expertness and a devout attention to the continuity of action in long takes at discerning angles, the fight is also presented in its existential purity &ndash; there&rsquo;s no television-style commentary accompanying it, no music added, no slow-motion or instant replay, nothing but the live sound of the fight and the crowd. For a little more than forty-five minutes, you are there.&rdquo;</p> Saturday, August 26 THE CONSPIRATORS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47865 <p>(OS INCONFIDENTES)<br /><br />Based on the poem &ldquo;Romanceiro da Inconfid&ecirc;ncia&rdquo; (1953) by Cecilia Meireles, THE CONSPIRATORS tells the story of the uprising known as the &ldquo;Inconfid&ecirc;ncia Mineira,&rdquo; Brazil&rsquo;s first attempt at independence from Portugal. When the coup was suppressed, only one of the conspirators &ndash; Joaquim Jos&eacute; da Silva Xavier (aka Tiradentes) &ndash; refused to throw himself on the mercy of the Portuguese crown, becoming a martyr and a mythic figure as a result. Filmed at the height of Brazil&rsquo;s military dictatorship, THE CONSPIRATORS traces Tiradentes&rsquo;s rise and fall, drawing veiled but clear connections between the country&rsquo;s past and present.</p> Saturday, August 26 BOXING GYM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47734 <p>Named after its rattail-sporting owner Richard Lord, a former amateur standout and professional, Lord&rsquo;s Gym in Austin, Texas, isn&rsquo;t so distinctive that you couldn&rsquo;t find its like scattered across the country, in cities as far flung as Choctaw and Salinas. And that &ndash; the gym&rsquo;s quotidian nature &ndash; is why Frederick Wiseman, one imagines, decided to settle on Lord&rsquo;s as the stand-in for an entire ecosystem, which in its diversity of people and fundamental sense of equality, mirrors something like America&rsquo;s ideal vision of itself: a glorious melting pot. One thing the ROCKY movies got right is that the idea of self-improvement remains as attractive as anything else in the pantheon of human ideals. With editing that rhymes with the percussive sounds and swift movements in the gym, BOXING GYM offers a vision of beauty only possible in a diverse social order, even if it might be closer to utopia than reality.</p> Saturday, August 26 CONJUGAL WARFARE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47869 <p>(GUERRA CONJUGAL)<br /><br />When asked to describe his second to last feature film, CONJUGAL WARFARE, Andrade said it combined &ldquo;domestic bondage, rotten kisses, varicose veins [with] senile lust, slaps, delirium of flowering flesh&hellip;and even the final victory of prostitution over old age.&rdquo; More than an anticipation of Pedro Almod&oacute;var&rsquo;s 1980s sexual comedies, CONJUGAL WARFARE is widely considered to be a critique of pornochanchadas, a genre of sexploitation films produced in Brazil. Here, Andrade adapts sixteen short stories by writer Dalton Trevisan, a chronicler of working class stories set in Curitiba, into a three-part film focused on a seductive lawyer, an elderly couple in an abusive relationship, and a young man with perverse sexual tastes.</p> Saturday, August 26 RAGING BULL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47731 <p>In her autobiography, Vicki LaMotta shares one of the entries in the diary her husband kept in his last days as a credible prizefighter: &ldquo;Ate bad, drank bad, gained eight pounds in one day.&rdquo; Indeed, Jake LaMotta, one of the top middleweights of the 1940s and 50s, led nothing if not a life dictated by sheer excess &ndash; of both mind and body. Scorsese&rsquo;s biopic of the &ldquo;Bronx Bull&rdquo; opens to the lilting, plangent notes of Pietro Mascagni&rsquo;s Intermezzo, as a hooded LaMotta (De Niro) is captured shadowboxing in a ring in slow motion. The stylized introduction suggests that the film will be nothing less than a poetic reimagining of prizefighting. In many respects, though, there is nothing poetic about LaMotta. He is a relentless brawler, an entertainer in the ring with a scary habit for self-abandon &ndash; who, as the saying goes, will take two punches to land one. But LaMotta&rsquo;s life at the top of the boxing food chain starts to crack when he finds himself unable to keep his emotions in check in real life. The career comes to a close, and ultimately the boxer sits bloated, reciting the words of Budd Schulberg&rsquo;s Terry Malloy: &ldquo;I could&rsquo;ve been a contender. I could&rsquo;ve been somebody, instead of a bum which is what I am.&rdquo; The boxer, then, as redeemed sinner.</p> Saturday, August 26 BRAZILWOOD MAN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47873 <p>(O HOMEM DO PAU-BRASIL)<br /><br />&ldquo;Andrade&rsquo;s final feature was arguably his greatest&hellip;a bemused, sexy, and positively ecstatic take on the life, work, and ideas of Oswald de Andrade, author of two cornerstones of Brazilian modernism, the 1924 &ldquo;Manifesto of Brazilwood Poetry&rdquo; and the 1928 &ldquo;Anthropophagic Manifesto&rdquo; or &ldquo;Cannibalist Manifesto.&rdquo; In a sense, this is Andrade&rsquo;s second homage to his namesake: the protagonist of MACUNA&Iacute;MA, in contrast to that of the original novel, was partly modeled on Oswald. Echoing the dual nature of that character, who is born as a fully grown adult and is transformed from black to white, THE BRAZILWOOD MAN gives us a double Oswald: a man and a cross-dressed woman appear together on screen, simultaneously playing the writer. In the end, the female Oswald, inspired by the manifesto&rsquo;s call for a revolutionary cannibalistic matriarchy, eats her male counterpart &ndash; just as Macuna&iacute;ma, back in the jungle after his loss-filled journey, is devoured by a pond nymph. The wilderness claims everything alien to it, and by the time he returns, Macuna&iacute;ma has become an Other. Lucid, sensual, and gloriously schizophrenic, THE BRAZILWOOD MAN has the lilt of a musical, and sparkles like an elegant comedy of manners, bursting with ideas and innuendos.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Saturday, August 26 BRAZILWOOD MAN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47874 <p>(O HOMEM DO PAU-BRASIL)<br /><br />&ldquo;Andrade&rsquo;s final feature was arguably his greatest&hellip;a bemused, sexy, and positively ecstatic take on the life, work, and ideas of Oswald de Andrade, author of two cornerstones of Brazilian modernism, the 1924 &ldquo;Manifesto of Brazilwood Poetry&rdquo; and the 1928 &ldquo;Anthropophagic Manifesto&rdquo; or &ldquo;Cannibalist Manifesto.&rdquo; In a sense, this is Andrade&rsquo;s second homage to his namesake: the protagonist of MACUNA&Iacute;MA, in contrast to that of the original novel, was partly modeled on Oswald. Echoing the dual nature of that character, who is born as a fully grown adult and is transformed from black to white, THE BRAZILWOOD MAN gives us a double Oswald: a man and a cross-dressed woman appear together on screen, simultaneously playing the writer. In the end, the female Oswald, inspired by the manifesto&rsquo;s call for a revolutionary cannibalistic matriarchy, eats her male counterpart &ndash; just as Macuna&iacute;ma, back in the jungle after his loss-filled journey, is devoured by a pond nymph. The wilderness claims everything alien to it, and by the time he returns, Macuna&iacute;ma has become an Other. Lucid, sensual, and gloriously schizophrenic, THE BRAZILWOOD MAN has the lilt of a musical, and sparkles like an elegant comedy of manners, bursting with ideas and innuendos.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Sunday, August 27 THE BOXER AND DEATH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47738 <p>(BOXER A SMRŤ)<br /><br />Two fists and a tucked-in chin: that&rsquo;s all you take inside a ring. It&rsquo;s little surprise then that boxing, a sport that requires no fancy gear and courts death, finds itself the subject of this Nazi concentration camp film. Here, boxing is the great equalizer. As a former boxer, camp inmate Jan Kominek earns the goodwill of the camp&rsquo;s commandant, Kraft. A former boxer himself, Kraft is in search of a sparring partner who might curb the onset of ennui and prepare him for a postwar boxing life, and so he makes Kominek his hobby. Thus a moral quandary is born: how does Kominek reconcile his privilege in the face of sure death? Solan sticks to the master-servant drama between Kraft and Kominek, but the horrors of the camps, while unseen, are constantly implied to devastating effect.</p> Sunday, August 27 CONJUGAL WARFARE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47870 <p>(GUERRA CONJUGAL)<br /><br />When asked to describe his second to last feature film, CONJUGAL WARFARE, Andrade said it combined &ldquo;domestic bondage, rotten kisses, varicose veins [with] senile lust, slaps, delirium of flowering flesh&hellip;and even the final victory of prostitution over old age.&rdquo; More than an anticipation of Pedro Almod&oacute;var&rsquo;s 1980s sexual comedies, CONJUGAL WARFARE is widely considered to be a critique of pornochanchadas, a genre of sexploitation films produced in Brazil. Here, Andrade adapts sixteen short stories by writer Dalton Trevisan, a chronicler of working class stories set in Curitiba, into a three-part film focused on a seductive lawyer, an elderly couple in an abusive relationship, and a young man with perverse sexual tastes.</p> Sunday, August 27 DAN STREIBLE: FIGHT PICTURES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47743 <p>SPECIAL PRESENTATION!<br /><br />Dan Streible, author of the definitive book on the subject, &ldquo;Fight Pictures&rdquo; (2008), presents a program of short films and clips illustrating the film industry&rsquo;s close relationship with professional boxing, from the very origins of cinema in the 1890s through the 1940s. Between 1894 and 1915, the first filmmakers made more than 250 motion pictures with boxing and prizefighting as their subject.<br /><br />Fight pictures were profitable but controversial productions in early cinema. Between 1912-40, the U.S. prohibited distribution of filmed prizefights &ndash; an unsuccessful attempt to suppress the celebrity of the first African American heavyweight champion, Jack Johnson, titleholder from 1908-15. Despite the criminalization of their trafficking, prizefight films flourished in the 1920s and 30s. Most of these films no longer survive or exist only in fragments.<br /><br />A highlight of tonight&rsquo;s program: Anthology premieres its new 35mm preservation of the only known footage of legendarily eccentric pugilist-artist-poet-dadaist Arthur Cravan as he spars circa 1916, the same year he fought exiled ex-champ Jack Johnson in Spain.<br /><br />Includes:<br />CORBETT AND COURTNEY BEFORE THE KINETOGRAPH (1894)<br />THE CORBETT-FITZSIMMONS FIGHT (1897)<br />SQUIRES VS. BURNS, OCEAN VIEW, CAL., JULY 4TH, 1907 (1907)<br />JACK JOHNSON: DER MEISTER BOXER DER WELT (1911)<br />[ARTHUR CRAVAN BOXING] ca. 1916, 3.5 min, 35mm, b&amp;w, silent. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives. Special thanks to Janice Allen &amp; Michael Kolvek (Cinema Arts).</p> Sunday, August 27 MACUNAÍMA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47858 <p>Widely considered one of the most influential works of Cinema Novo, MACUNA&Iacute;MA is a hilariously biting adaptation of Mario de Andrade&rsquo;s eponymous novel, itself a canonical text of early Brazilian modernism. Published in 1928, it tells the story of &ldquo;a hero without a character,&rdquo; the son of a native Indian who is born black, spends the first six years of his life without uttering a word (due to &ldquo;laziness&rdquo;), and turns white before venturing into the capitalist jungle of S&atilde;o Paulo. In the filmic version of the story, the main character is very much an ordinary man, and the only magical elements that remain are his transformation into a white man and Macuna&iacute;ma&rsquo;s use of macumba &ndash; an Afro-Brazilian religion that mixes sorcery and ritual dance. The protagonist is played first by Grande Otelo (black Macuna&iacute;ma) and then by Paulo Jos&eacute; (white Macuna&iacute;ma), two of Brazil&rsquo;s most celebrated actors. As Macuna&iacute;ma ventures into S&atilde;o Paulo, he falls in love with Ci (Dina Sfat), fathers a black son (also played by Otelo), and is co-opted by terrorists who enlist him in their schemes &ndash; all the while encountering Brazilian folk legends and orix&aacute;s along the way.</p> Sunday, August 27 THE MILKY WAY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47741 <p>Preservation print courtesy of the UCLA Film &amp; Television Archive.<br /><br />Though the bulk of Leo McCarey&rsquo;s early education in filmmaking and comedy came from his stint at the Hal Roach Studio, his penchant for theatrics is perhaps inborn: McCarey&rsquo;s father was none other than the fight impresario, &ldquo;Uncle Tom&rdquo; McCarey, who at the turn-of-the-century helped transform L.A. into a prizefighting destination. Prizefighting is nothing if not a realm of show business that relies heavily on the canny, relentless art of promotion, a point that McCarey elaborates to great effect in THE MILKY WAY. Buleigh Sullivan (Harold Lloyd) is a meek, bespectacled milk delivery man on one of his nightly rounds, when a chance confrontation with a sloshed tough, Speed McFarland, lands him on the following morning&rsquo;s front page news: &ldquo;Truck Driver Knocks Out Champion&rdquo; &ndash; that is, the middleweight champion of the world. So starts an unassuming milkman&rsquo;s boxing career. McCarey hews to techniques defined by his silent film roots, eschewing close-ups and flashy cutting in favor of a camera that sits back to capture the bodies in concert with each other, one pratfall after the other.</p> Sunday, August 27 THE CONSPIRATORS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47866 <p>(OS INCONFIDENTES)<br /><br />Based on the poem &ldquo;Romanceiro da Inconfid&ecirc;ncia&rdquo; (1953) by Cecilia Meireles, THE CONSPIRATORS tells the story of the uprising known as the &ldquo;Inconfid&ecirc;ncia Mineira,&rdquo; Brazil&rsquo;s first attempt at independence from Portugal. When the coup was suppressed, only one of the conspirators &ndash; Joaquim Jos&eacute; da Silva Xavier (aka Tiradentes) &ndash; refused to throw himself on the mercy of the Portuguese crown, becoming a martyr and a mythic figure as a result. Filmed at the height of Brazil&rsquo;s military dictatorship, THE CONSPIRATORS traces Tiradentes&rsquo;s rise and fall, drawing veiled but clear connections between the country&rsquo;s past and present.</p> Sunday, August 27 GARRINCHA: HERO OF THE JUNGLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47862 <p>(GARRINCHA, ALEGRIA DO POVO)<br /><br />&ldquo;Andrade&rsquo;s feature debut, GARRINCHA is a documentary portrait of a celebrated soccer player who owes his wondrous abilities to his peculiar physiology &ndash; one of his legs is bent inward and the other curves outward. Moving in strange ways, with broken rhythms, the film is divided into roughly three sections: a celebration of soccer itself, weaving moving images and stills into a stream of impressions that at times verges on abstraction; a direct-cinema style look at Garrincha&rsquo;s daily life and his celebrity; and a study of the player&rsquo;s performance in Brazil&rsquo;s back-to-back World Cup final wins, with Garrincha upstaged by star striker Pel&eacute; in 1958 and stricken with fever and blending in with his teammates in 1962 &ndash; another hero swallowed up. [&hellip;] One of the greatest films ever made about soccer.&rdquo; &ndash;Olaf M&ouml;ller, FILM COMMENT</p> Monday, August 28 THE PRIEST AND THE GIRL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47854 <p>(O PADRE E A MO&Ccedil;A)<br /><br />Shot in a small village in the province of Minas Gerais, Andrade&rsquo;s first full-fledged feature film calls to mind Robert Bresson in its formal austerity, severe black-and-white cinematography, and religious milieu. The film&rsquo;s protagonist is a young priest who arrives in the village to replace his dying predecessor. He befriends the young and beautiful Mariana, only to discover that she&rsquo;s enmeshed in an incestuous relationship with one of the town&rsquo;s most prominent residents. In his attempts to save Mariana, he has to contend not only with the villagers&rsquo; moral narrow-mindedness but with his own internal struggle between love for the girl and the strictures of his faith. In telling this story, Andrade draws parallels between the townspeople&rsquo;s blind adherence to social, moral, and political conventions, and the state of Brazilian society as a whole.</p> Monday, August 28 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47793 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Tuesday, August 29 THE CONSPIRATORS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47867 <p>(OS INCONFIDENTES)<br /><br />Based on the poem &ldquo;Romanceiro da Inconfid&ecirc;ncia&rdquo; (1953) by Cecilia Meireles, THE CONSPIRATORS tells the story of the uprising known as the &ldquo;Inconfid&ecirc;ncia Mineira,&rdquo; Brazil&rsquo;s first attempt at independence from Portugal. When the coup was suppressed, only one of the conspirators &ndash; Joaquim Jos&eacute; da Silva Xavier (aka Tiradentes) &ndash; refused to throw himself on the mercy of the Portuguese crown, becoming a martyr and a mythic figure as a result. Filmed at the height of Brazil&rsquo;s military dictatorship, THE CONSPIRATORS traces Tiradentes&rsquo;s rise and fall, drawing veiled but clear connections between the country&rsquo;s past and present.</p> Tuesday, August 29 CONJUGAL WARFARE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=08&year=2017#showing-47871 <p>(GUERRA CONJUGAL)<br /><br />When asked to describe his second to last feature film, CONJUGAL WARFARE, Andrade said it combined &ldquo;domestic bondage, rotten kisses, varicose veins [with] senile lust, slaps, delirium of flowering flesh&hellip;and even the final victory of prostitution over old age.&rdquo; More than an anticipation of Pedro Almod&oacute;var&rsquo;s 1980s sexual comedies, CONJUGAL WARFARE is widely considered to be a critique of pornochanchadas, a genre of sexploitation films produced in Brazil. Here, Andrade adapts sixteen short stories by writer Dalton Trevisan, a chronicler of working class stories set in Curitiba, into a three-part film focused on a seductive lawyer, an elderly couple in an abusive relationship, and a young man with perverse sexual tastes.</p> Tuesday, August 29