Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Mon, 27 Feb 2017 18:19:10 -0500 PARAGUAY REMEMBERED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2017#showing-46902 <p>(MEMORIA DESMEMORIADA)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! DIRECTOR IN PERSON!<br /><br />Co-presented by Cinema Tropical.<br /><br />With a background in ethnography and psychology, French photographer and filmmaker Dominique Dubosc has been making nonfiction films and videos since the late 1960s. Wide-ranging both culturally and geographically, his body of work has encompassed extensive investigations into Latin America, Palestine, and the U.S., among other places, and has found him evoking or collaborating with figures from writers Felix F&eacute;n&eacute;on and Georges Perec, to photographer Duane Michals, to filmmakers Jean Rouch and Jonas Mekas.<br /><br />His new, feature-length film, PARAGUAY REMEMBERED, finds him returning for the first time in 40 years to the region that gave rise to his first films &ndash; the trilogy comprising KUARAHY OHECHA (1968), MANOJHARA (1969), and THE DAYS OF OUR DEATH (1970). As he wanders in Asuncion and meets old and new friends, fragments of memories he had forgotten are revived. The shooting process itself becomes the means to remember. Little by little, his memories take him back to a romantic encounter with a woman in Argentina. Incidents of oppression under dictatorship are intertwined with his private recollections. PARAGUAY REMEMBERED is both a penetrating portrait of a city and a society, and a haunting investigation into the mechanics and poetics of memory.<br /><br />&ldquo;For Dubosc, cinema is not a spectacle but a form of writing, a living text that [here] displays the landscapes of the past in the present instant. The film is an involuntary return to the 1970s when the Condor Plan spread over Latin America and the Stroessner dictatorship continued in Paraguay. Dubosc succeeds in creating an &lsquo;exquisite&rsquo; construction that integrates historical facts, personal feelings, visual esthetics, and poetical discourse.&rdquo; &ndash;Adriana Almada, BOLIVIA BIENNIAL 2016</p> Monday, February 27 SKIP TRACER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2017#showing-46987 <p>Dalen&rsquo;s rarely-seen directorial debut is lean and mean in the best possible way, an uncompromising character study about a driven and coolly effective debt collector (David Petersen, brilliant in his first film role) for a Vancouver loan agency. A perennial &ldquo;Man of the Year&rdquo; at his office, the film finds Petersen at something of a crossroads, as the pressures of his profession begin to wear him down. After some high-profile festival exposure, including the New York Film Festival in 1978, the film all but disappeared, resurfacing briefly in the 1980s for a VHS release under a different title. Owing to this slipshod release pattern, it&rsquo;s come to be regarded as one of the lost masterpieces of the Canadian tax shelter era.<br /><br />&ldquo;A downbeat film set in a seedy &lsquo;70s version of Vancouver where ubiquitous construction sites signal the oncoming wave of gentrification, the film falls between a noir and a western in tone &ndash; the latter especially fitting given that Dalen had abandoned an unproduced oater script to focus on SKIP TRACER.&rdquo; &ndash;Kier-La Janisse, OFF SCREEN</p> Monday, February 27 PARAGUAY REMEMBERED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2017#showing-46903 <p>(MEMORIA DESMEMORIADA)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! DIRECTOR IN PERSON!<br /><br />Co-presented by Cinema Tropical.<br /><br />With a background in ethnography and psychology, French photographer and filmmaker Dominique Dubosc has been making nonfiction films and videos since the late 1960s. Wide-ranging both culturally and geographically, his body of work has encompassed extensive investigations into Latin America, Palestine, and the U.S., among other places, and has found him evoking or collaborating with figures from writers Felix F&eacute;n&eacute;on and Georges Perec, to photographer Duane Michals, to filmmakers Jean Rouch and Jonas Mekas.<br /><br />His new, feature-length film, PARAGUAY REMEMBERED, finds him returning for the first time in 40 years to the region that gave rise to his first films &ndash; the trilogy comprising KUARAHY OHECHA (1968), MANOJHARA (1969), and THE DAYS OF OUR DEATH (1970). As he wanders in Asuncion and meets old and new friends, fragments of memories he had forgotten are revived. The shooting process itself becomes the means to remember. Little by little, his memories take him back to a romantic encounter with a woman in Argentina. Incidents of oppression under dictatorship are intertwined with his private recollections. PARAGUAY REMEMBERED is both a penetrating portrait of a city and a society, and a haunting investigation into the mechanics and poetics of memory.<br /><br />&ldquo;For Dubosc, cinema is not a spectacle but a form of writing, a living text that [here] displays the landscapes of the past in the present instant. The film is an involuntary return to the 1970s when the Condor Plan spread over Latin America and the Stroessner dictatorship continued in Paraguay. Dubosc succeeds in creating an &lsquo;exquisite&rsquo; construction that integrates historical facts, personal feelings, visual esthetics, and poetical discourse.&rdquo; &ndash;Adriana Almada, BOLIVIA BIENNIAL 2016</p> Monday, February 27 THE LITTLE GIRL WHO LIVES DOWN THE LANE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2017#showing-46990 <p>In the same year she stunned as Iris in TAXI DRIVER, wunderkind child actress Jodie Foster decamped to Knowlton, Quebec, to film this slow-burn thriller about a preternaturally wise young girl living with her writer father in a secluded old mansion. Among the locals who come calling on her are a crippled teenage magician (Scott Jacoby of BAD RONALD), a friendly cop (Mort Shuman, who wrote &ldquo;Viva Las Vegas&rdquo; for Elvis), a nasty landlady (Alexis Smith), and her pedophile son (Martin Sheen). One of the darker and more disturbing of PG films, the material offers a fine showcase for Foster, who more than holds her own against her older co-stars.<br /><br />&ldquo;[T]his eerie Canadian production left a massive impression on countless 70s youngsters and continues to captivate anyone who stumbles across it. The macabre story flirts with gothic horror and classic suspense without quite settling into either, casting a unique, atmospheric spell of its own that has yet to be duplicated.&rdquo; &ndash;Nathaniel Thompson, MONDO DIGITAL</p> Monday, February 27 PARAGUAY REMEMBERED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2017#showing-46904 <p>(MEMORIA DESMEMORIADA)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! DIRECTOR IN PERSON!<br /><br />Co-presented by Cinema Tropical.<br /><br />With a background in ethnography and psychology, French photographer and filmmaker Dominique Dubosc has been making nonfiction films and videos since the late 1960s. Wide-ranging both culturally and geographically, his body of work has encompassed extensive investigations into Latin America, Palestine, and the U.S., among other places, and has found him evoking or collaborating with figures from writers Felix F&eacute;n&eacute;on and Georges Perec, to photographer Duane Michals, to filmmakers Jean Rouch and Jonas Mekas.<br /><br />His new, feature-length film, PARAGUAY REMEMBERED, finds him returning for the first time in 40 years to the region that gave rise to his first films &ndash; the trilogy comprising KUARAHY OHECHA (1968), MANOJHARA (1969), and THE DAYS OF OUR DEATH (1970). As he wanders in Asuncion and meets old and new friends, fragments of memories he had forgotten are revived. The shooting process itself becomes the means to remember. Little by little, his memories take him back to a romantic encounter with a woman in Argentina. Incidents of oppression under dictatorship are intertwined with his private recollections. PARAGUAY REMEMBERED is both a penetrating portrait of a city and a society, and a haunting investigation into the mechanics and poetics of memory.<br /><br />&ldquo;For Dubosc, cinema is not a spectacle but a form of writing, a living text that [here] displays the landscapes of the past in the present instant. The film is an involuntary return to the 1970s when the Condor Plan spread over Latin America and the Stroessner dictatorship continued in Paraguay. Dubosc succeeds in creating an &lsquo;exquisite&rsquo; construction that integrates historical facts, personal feelings, visual esthetics, and poetical discourse.&rdquo; &ndash;Adriana Almada, BOLIVIA BIENNIAL 2016</p> Tuesday, February 28 FLAHERTY NYC PRESENTS: BROKEN SENSES: PROGRAM 4: KINESTHETIC HISTORY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2017#showing-46886 <p><strong><em>Soda_Jerk, M&oacute;nica Savir&oacute;n, Luis Par&eacute;s, and Sandra Ruesga in person.<br /><br /></em></strong>These works critically interrogate image production and the reproduction of images as materials of thought; they question historical continuities and ideological certainties of representation. The artists tackle the &ldquo;muscle sense&rdquo; of fascist history embodied in the life of Spanish filmmakers; a cinematic study on the color film stock made in Nazi Germany; speculative fiction and the personal experience of time, immigration, and the poetics of film deterioration.<br /><br />Sandra Ruesga HACIENDO MEMORIA 2005, 10 min, digital<br />Mareike Bernien &amp; Kerstin Schroedinger RAINBOW&rsquo;S GRAVITY 2014, 33 min, digital<br />Soda_Jerk THE TIME THAT REMAINS 2012, 12 min, digital<br />M&oacute;nica Savir&oacute;n ANSWER PRINT 2016, 5 min, 16mm<br />Soda_Jerk &amp; The Avalanches THE WAS 2016, 14 min, digital<br />Luis Par&eacute;s THE CADAVER OF TIME 2016, 13 min, digital<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.</p> Tuesday, February 28 PARAGUAY REMEMBERED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=02&year=2017#showing-46905 <p>(MEMORIA DESMEMORIADA)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! DIRECTOR IN PERSON!<br /><br />Co-presented by Cinema Tropical.<br /><br />With a background in ethnography and psychology, French photographer and filmmaker Dominique Dubosc has been making nonfiction films and videos since the late 1960s. Wide-ranging both culturally and geographically, his body of work has encompassed extensive investigations into Latin America, Palestine, and the U.S., among other places, and has found him evoking or collaborating with figures from writers Felix F&eacute;n&eacute;on and Georges Perec, to photographer Duane Michals, to filmmakers Jean Rouch and Jonas Mekas.<br /><br />His new, feature-length film, PARAGUAY REMEMBERED, finds him returning for the first time in 40 years to the region that gave rise to his first films &ndash; the trilogy comprising KUARAHY OHECHA (1968), MANOJHARA (1969), and THE DAYS OF OUR DEATH (1970). As he wanders in Asuncion and meets old and new friends, fragments of memories he had forgotten are revived. The shooting process itself becomes the means to remember. Little by little, his memories take him back to a romantic encounter with a woman in Argentina. Incidents of oppression under dictatorship are intertwined with his private recollections. PARAGUAY REMEMBERED is both a penetrating portrait of a city and a society, and a haunting investigation into the mechanics and poetics of memory.<br /><br />&ldquo;For Dubosc, cinema is not a spectacle but a form of writing, a living text that [here] displays the landscapes of the past in the present instant. The film is an involuntary return to the 1970s when the Condor Plan spread over Latin America and the Stroessner dictatorship continued in Paraguay. Dubosc succeeds in creating an &lsquo;exquisite&rsquo; construction that integrates historical facts, personal feelings, visual esthetics, and poetical discourse.&rdquo; &ndash;Adriana Almada, BOLIVIA BIENNIAL 2016</p> Tuesday, February 28 PARAGUAY REMEMBERED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46906 <p>(MEMORIA DESMEMORIADA)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! DIRECTOR IN PERSON!<br /><br />Co-presented by Cinema Tropical.<br /><br />With a background in ethnography and psychology, French photographer and filmmaker Dominique Dubosc has been making nonfiction films and videos since the late 1960s. Wide-ranging both culturally and geographically, his body of work has encompassed extensive investigations into Latin America, Palestine, and the U.S., among other places, and has found him evoking or collaborating with figures from writers Felix F&eacute;n&eacute;on and Georges Perec, to photographer Duane Michals, to filmmakers Jean Rouch and Jonas Mekas.<br /><br />His new, feature-length film, PARAGUAY REMEMBERED, finds him returning for the first time in 40 years to the region that gave rise to his first films &ndash; the trilogy comprising KUARAHY OHECHA (1968), MANOJHARA (1969), and THE DAYS OF OUR DEATH (1970). As he wanders in Asuncion and meets old and new friends, fragments of memories he had forgotten are revived. The shooting process itself becomes the means to remember. Little by little, his memories take him back to a romantic encounter with a woman in Argentina. Incidents of oppression under dictatorship are intertwined with his private recollections. PARAGUAY REMEMBERED is both a penetrating portrait of a city and a society, and a haunting investigation into the mechanics and poetics of memory.<br /><br />&ldquo;For Dubosc, cinema is not a spectacle but a form of writing, a living text that [here] displays the landscapes of the past in the present instant. The film is an involuntary return to the 1970s when the Condor Plan spread over Latin America and the Stroessner dictatorship continued in Paraguay. Dubosc succeeds in creating an &lsquo;exquisite&rsquo; construction that integrates historical facts, personal feelings, visual esthetics, and poetical discourse.&rdquo; &ndash;Adriana Almada, BOLIVIA BIENNIAL 2016</p> Wednesday, March 01 ATLANTIC CITY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46967 <p>Perhaps the most lauded Canadian tax shelter film &ndash; nominated for five Oscars in all the major categories, though winner of none &ndash; Malle&rsquo;s romantic crime drama was actually filmed almost entirely in New Jersey. In his last great role, Burt Lancaster is an over-the-hill, never-had-a-prime hood who falls for an oyster bar waitress (Susan Sarandon) and becomes entangled with her pot dealer husband (Robert Joy) and some of his very dangerous customers. Justly remembered for its performances, Malle&rsquo;s evocative use of a rapidly redeveloping Atlantic City plays an equally vital role in the success of the film. High-rise luxury hotels go up and older buildings are demolished before our eyes as the onscreen drama plays out. The international cast includes Michel Piccoli, Kate Reid, Robert Goulet, and Wallace Shawn, as well as recognizable Canadian character actors, such as Robert Joy, Hollis McLaren (co-star of OUTRAGEOUS!), Al Waxman, Sean McCann, Sean Sullivan, Harvey Atkin, and Angus MacInnes. The film&rsquo;s DP was Richard Ciupka, ill-fated director of Canuxploitation favorite CURTAINS and its composer, renowned French maestro Michel Legrand.<br /><br />&ldquo;Though much of the movie&hellip;was obviously photographed on location, the film&rsquo;s Atlantic City is the particular creation of Mr. Malle, the director, of John Guare, the playwright who wrote the screenplay, and of Richard Ciupka, who photographed it. It&rsquo;s a place of myth, of legends and dreams, most of them pretty tacky. It&rsquo;s beautiful and squalid and, like the movie itself, sometimes rueful and sometimes funny.&rdquo; &ndash;Vincent Canby, NEW YORK TIMES</p> Wednesday, March 01 PARAGUAY REMEMBERED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46907 <p>(MEMORIA DESMEMORIADA)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! DIRECTOR IN PERSON!<br /><br />Co-presented by Cinema Tropical.<br /><br />With a background in ethnography and psychology, French photographer and filmmaker Dominique Dubosc has been making nonfiction films and videos since the late 1960s. Wide-ranging both culturally and geographically, his body of work has encompassed extensive investigations into Latin America, Palestine, and the U.S., among other places, and has found him evoking or collaborating with figures from writers Felix F&eacute;n&eacute;on and Georges Perec, to photographer Duane Michals, to filmmakers Jean Rouch and Jonas Mekas.<br /><br />His new, feature-length film, PARAGUAY REMEMBERED, finds him returning for the first time in 40 years to the region that gave rise to his first films &ndash; the trilogy comprising KUARAHY OHECHA (1968), MANOJHARA (1969), and THE DAYS OF OUR DEATH (1970). As he wanders in Asuncion and meets old and new friends, fragments of memories he had forgotten are revived. The shooting process itself becomes the means to remember. Little by little, his memories take him back to a romantic encounter with a woman in Argentina. Incidents of oppression under dictatorship are intertwined with his private recollections. PARAGUAY REMEMBERED is both a penetrating portrait of a city and a society, and a haunting investigation into the mechanics and poetics of memory.<br /><br />&ldquo;For Dubosc, cinema is not a spectacle but a form of writing, a living text that [here] displays the landscapes of the past in the present instant. The film is an involuntary return to the 1970s when the Condor Plan spread over Latin America and the Stroessner dictatorship continued in Paraguay. Dubosc succeeds in creating an &lsquo;exquisite&rsquo; construction that integrates historical facts, personal feelings, visual esthetics, and poetical discourse.&rdquo; &ndash;Adriana Almada, BOLIVIA BIENNIAL 2016</p> Wednesday, March 01 TICKET TO HEAVEN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46993 <p>The winner of four Genie Awards, including Best Motion Picture, Best Actor (Nick Mancuso), and Best Supporting Actor (Saul Rubinek), TICKET TO HEAVEN is a harrowing docudrama about a depressed young man (Mancuso) who is swept up into a Moonie-like cult, and the efforts of his best friend (Rubinek) and a deprogrammer (R.H. Thomson) to bring him back to the outside world. Never have Meg Foster, as a particularly intense cult member, and her penetrating green eyes been better cast. Other players include a &ldquo;love-bombing&rdquo; Kim Cattrall, Guy Boyd, and Robert Joy. The film was based on the first-hand account of Josh Freed, who tried to save a friend and briefly entered Reverend Moon&rsquo;s Unification Church, and later wrote about it in his book MOONWEBS. Though relatively unknown, this utterly convincing sleeper is often referred to as the best narrative film about cults.<br /><br />&ldquo;What makes the movie absolutely spellbinding is that it shows us not only how [the protagonist] is recruited into the group, but how anyone could be indoctrinated into one of the many cults in America today. This is a movie that has done its research, and it is made with such artistry that we share the experience of the young man.&rdquo; &ndash;Roger Ebert, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES</p> Wednesday, March 01 PARAGUAY REMEMBERED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46908 <p>(MEMORIA DESMEMORIADA)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! DIRECTOR IN PERSON!<br /><br />Co-presented by Cinema Tropical.<br /><br />With a background in ethnography and psychology, French photographer and filmmaker Dominique Dubosc has been making nonfiction films and videos since the late 1960s. Wide-ranging both culturally and geographically, his body of work has encompassed extensive investigations into Latin America, Palestine, and the U.S., among other places, and has found him evoking or collaborating with figures from writers Felix F&eacute;n&eacute;on and Georges Perec, to photographer Duane Michals, to filmmakers Jean Rouch and Jonas Mekas.<br /><br />His new, feature-length film, PARAGUAY REMEMBERED, finds him returning for the first time in 40 years to the region that gave rise to his first films &ndash; the trilogy comprising KUARAHY OHECHA (1968), MANOJHARA (1969), and THE DAYS OF OUR DEATH (1970). As he wanders in Asuncion and meets old and new friends, fragments of memories he had forgotten are revived. The shooting process itself becomes the means to remember. Little by little, his memories take him back to a romantic encounter with a woman in Argentina. Incidents of oppression under dictatorship are intertwined with his private recollections. PARAGUAY REMEMBERED is both a penetrating portrait of a city and a society, and a haunting investigation into the mechanics and poetics of memory.<br /><br />&ldquo;For Dubosc, cinema is not a spectacle but a form of writing, a living text that [here] displays the landscapes of the past in the present instant. The film is an involuntary return to the 1970s when the Condor Plan spread over Latin America and the Stroessner dictatorship continued in Paraguay. Dubosc succeeds in creating an &lsquo;exquisite&rsquo; construction that integrates historical facts, personal feelings, visual esthetics, and poetical discourse.&rdquo; &ndash;Adriana Almada, BOLIVIA BIENNIAL 2016</p> Thursday, March 02 SUDDEN FURY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46996 <p>One-and-done director Damude delivers the goods with this tense and gritty backwoods drama-cum-Hitchcockian thriller, a lesser-known entry in the Canuxploitation canon. When a bickering couple crash their car in a remote rural area, the husband (Dominic Hogan), sensing a substantial insurance payout, leaves his wife (Gay Rowan) to die. But when a good samaritan (Dan Hennessey) arrives on the scene, an increasingly deadly game of cat and mouse ensues. Hollis McLaren and Sean McCann, who appear elsewhere in this series, round out the film&rsquo;s small cast.<br /><br />&ldquo;The slightly stilted, over-articulated acting of the early scenes could almost be a deliberate audience trap: soon enough the bottom drops out, quickly giving way to one of the finest and most affecting thrillers ever to come out of this country. Damude goes for Hitchcock gothic, taking the familiar motifs of guilt, desperation and mistaken identity and transposing them to the Ontario countryside.&rdquo; &ndash;Jonathan Culp, CINERTIA</p> Thursday, March 02 PARAGUAY REMEMBERED http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46909 <p>(MEMORIA DESMEMORIADA)<br /><br />U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! DIRECTOR IN PERSON!<br /><br />Co-presented by Cinema Tropical.<br /><br />With a background in ethnography and psychology, French photographer and filmmaker Dominique Dubosc has been making nonfiction films and videos since the late 1960s. Wide-ranging both culturally and geographically, his body of work has encompassed extensive investigations into Latin America, Palestine, and the U.S., among other places, and has found him evoking or collaborating with figures from writers Felix F&eacute;n&eacute;on and Georges Perec, to photographer Duane Michals, to filmmakers Jean Rouch and Jonas Mekas.<br /><br />His new, feature-length film, PARAGUAY REMEMBERED, finds him returning for the first time in 40 years to the region that gave rise to his first films &ndash; the trilogy comprising KUARAHY OHECHA (1968), MANOJHARA (1969), and THE DAYS OF OUR DEATH (1970). As he wanders in Asuncion and meets old and new friends, fragments of memories he had forgotten are revived. The shooting process itself becomes the means to remember. Little by little, his memories take him back to a romantic encounter with a woman in Argentina. Incidents of oppression under dictatorship are intertwined with his private recollections. PARAGUAY REMEMBERED is both a penetrating portrait of a city and a society, and a haunting investigation into the mechanics and poetics of memory.<br /><br />&ldquo;For Dubosc, cinema is not a spectacle but a form of writing, a living text that [here] displays the landscapes of the past in the present instant. The film is an involuntary return to the 1970s when the Condor Plan spread over Latin America and the Stroessner dictatorship continued in Paraguay. Dubosc succeeds in creating an &lsquo;exquisite&rsquo; construction that integrates historical facts, personal feelings, visual esthetics, and poetical discourse.&rdquo; &ndash;Adriana Almada, BOLIVIA BIENNIAL 2016</p> Thursday, March 02 BLACK CHRISTMAS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46960 <p>It was HALLOWEEN that jump-started the slasher craze of the late 70s and 80s, but the lesser-known BLACK CHRISTMAS deserves credit for being well ahead of that curve, as well as for being a superlative and infinitely creepy example of the genre. Made in Canada by American Clark, the film is set during the Christmas holiday season in a sorority house, as an unseen psychopath embarks on a brutal killing spree and torments his future victims via heavy-breathing phone calls. Clark eschews gore and clear shots of the killer, instead filming from the maniac&rsquo;s p.o.v. (before the technique became <em>de rigueur</em>), and builds tension with suggestion and an atmospheric wintry milieu. Olivia Hussey, John Saxon, Andrea Martin, and Keir Dullea star alongside Canadians Doug McGrath, Art Hindle, Lynne Griffin, and Margot Kidder.<br /><br />&ldquo;Much of the shtick used by Clark and screenwriter Roy Moore was later stolen both by countless hacks and at least one real artist (HALLOWEEN director John Carpenter), but few repeated Clark&rsquo;s most devious tactic, accompanying the violence with the sound of the killer&rsquo;s nerve-jangling maniacal shouting. In BLACK CHRISTMAS, the audience can&rsquo;t escape the horror by closing their eyes.&rdquo; &ndash;Noel Murray, ONION A.V. CLUB</p> Thursday, March 02 ATLANTIC CITY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46968 <p>Perhaps the most lauded Canadian tax shelter film &ndash; nominated for five Oscars in all the major categories, though winner of none &ndash; Malle&rsquo;s romantic crime drama was actually filmed almost entirely in New Jersey. In his last great role, Burt Lancaster is an over-the-hill, never-had-a-prime hood who falls for an oyster bar waitress (Susan Sarandon) and becomes entangled with her pot dealer husband (Robert Joy) and some of his very dangerous customers. Justly remembered for its performances, Malle&rsquo;s evocative use of a rapidly redeveloping Atlantic City plays an equally vital role in the success of the film. High-rise luxury hotels go up and older buildings are demolished before our eyes as the onscreen drama plays out. The international cast includes Michel Piccoli, Kate Reid, Robert Goulet, and Wallace Shawn, as well as recognizable Canadian character actors, such as Robert Joy, Hollis McLaren (co-star of OUTRAGEOUS!), Al Waxman, Sean McCann, Sean Sullivan, Harvey Atkin, and Angus MacInnes. The film&rsquo;s DP was Richard Ciupka, ill-fated director of Canuxploitation favorite CURTAINS and its composer, renowned French maestro Michel Legrand.<br /><br />&ldquo;Though much of the movie&hellip;was obviously photographed on location, the film&rsquo;s Atlantic City is the particular creation of Mr. Malle, the director, of John Guare, the playwright who wrote the screenplay, and of Richard Ciupka, who photographed it. It&rsquo;s a place of myth, of legends and dreams, most of them pretty tacky. It&rsquo;s beautiful and squalid and, like the movie itself, sometimes rueful and sometimes funny.&rdquo; &ndash;Vincent Canby, NEW YORK TIMES</p> Friday, March 03 EC: CITIZEN KANE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47108 <p>&ldquo;Welles&rsquo;s first feature is probably the most respected, analyzed, and parodied of all films. Although its archival and historical value are unchallenged, CITIZEN KANE, nevertheless, seems fresh on each new viewing. The film touches on so many aspects of American life &ndash; politics and sex, friendship and betrayal, youth and old age &ndash; that it has become a film for all moods and generations. In its expansive way, it creates a kaleidoscopic panorama of a man&rsquo;s life. Loosely based on the life of the newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, CITIZEN KANE is the saga of the rise to power of a &lsquo;poor little rich boy&rsquo; starved for affection, as Welles himself was after his parents&rsquo; early deaths. It is also a meditation on emotional greed, the ease of amassing wealth, and the difficulty of sustaining love.&rdquo; &ndash;MoMA</p> Friday, March 03 BLOOD RELATIVES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46981 <p>(LES LIENS DE SANG)<br /><br />Chabrol&rsquo;s rarely-seen Canadian/French police procedural transplants Ed McBain&rsquo;s Detective Steve Carella from the 87th Precinct to the streets of Old Montreal, with Donald Sutherland as Carella, on the hunt for the killer of a teenage girl (Lisa Langlois). Crossing paths with the detective as he investigates are Donald Pleasence as a pedophile and David Hemmings as the murdered girl&rsquo;s boss. The supporting cast includes Chabrol&rsquo;s then-spouse Stephane Audran as the girl&rsquo;s alcoholic mother, and Langlois, in her film debut, who would become a familiar face in Canuxploitation fare over the next several years.<br /><br />&ldquo;Chabrol&rsquo;s masterful touch is apparent from the brooding, sinewy photography and the mood shifts from harrowing to lyrical abetted by regular collaborators cinematographer Jean Rabier and composer Pierre Jansen. Donald Sutherland gives a compelling, subdued yet sensitive performance as a detective numbed by the grisly nature of his job yet clinging onto his humanity.&rdquo; &ndash;Andrew Pragasam, THE SPINNING IMAGE</p> Friday, March 03 EC: CITIZEN KANE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47109 <p>&ldquo;Welles&rsquo;s first feature is probably the most respected, analyzed, and parodied of all films. Although its archival and historical value are unchallenged, CITIZEN KANE, nevertheless, seems fresh on each new viewing. The film touches on so many aspects of American life &ndash; politics and sex, friendship and betrayal, youth and old age &ndash; that it has become a film for all moods and generations. In its expansive way, it creates a kaleidoscopic panorama of a man&rsquo;s life. Loosely based on the life of the newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, CITIZEN KANE is the saga of the rise to power of a &lsquo;poor little rich boy&rsquo; starved for affection, as Welles himself was after his parents&rsquo; early deaths. It is also a meditation on emotional greed, the ease of amassing wealth, and the difficulty of sustaining love.&rdquo; &ndash;MoMA</p> Saturday, March 04 THE LITTLE GIRL WHO LIVES DOWN THE LANE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46991 <p>In the same year she stunned as Iris in TAXI DRIVER, wunderkind child actress Jodie Foster decamped to Knowlton, Quebec, to film this slow-burn thriller about a preternaturally wise young girl living with her writer father in a secluded old mansion. Among the locals who come calling on her are a crippled teenage magician (Scott Jacoby of BAD RONALD), a friendly cop (Mort Shuman, who wrote &ldquo;Viva Las Vegas&rdquo; for Elvis), a nasty landlady (Alexis Smith), and her pedophile son (Martin Sheen). One of the darker and more disturbing of PG films, the material offers a fine showcase for Foster, who more than holds her own against her older co-stars.<br /><br />&ldquo;[T]his eerie Canadian production left a massive impression on countless 70s youngsters and continues to captivate anyone who stumbles across it. The macabre story flirts with gothic horror and classic suspense without quite settling into either, casting a unique, atmospheric spell of its own that has yet to be duplicated.&rdquo; &ndash;Nathaniel Thompson, MONDO DIGITAL</p> Saturday, March 04 THE BROOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46984 <p>Following a brief detour into non-horror moviemaking that resulted in the racing drama FAST COMPANY, Cronenberg returned to the &lsquo;body horror&rsquo; sub-genre he pioneered, with one of his signature pictures, THE BROOD. Imported UK stars Oliver Reed, as a controversial psychotherapist, and Samantha Eggar, as his &lsquo;queen bee&rsquo; patient, appear alongside Canadian Art Hindle, as Eggar&rsquo;s estranged husband fighting her for custody of their young daughter. Reed encourages his patients to rid themselves of their mental illnesses by bringing about physiological changes in their bodies&hellip;leading to the spawning of a brood of murderous mutant children who act on Eggar&rsquo;s rages. Referring to the coincidence of its release in the same year as a far more mainstream take on similar topics, Cronenberg has called THE BROOD &ldquo;<em>my</em> version of KRAMER VS. KRAMER,&rdquo; while noting that that film&rsquo;s &ldquo;happy ending&rdquo; was a million miles away from his take on divorce and child custody battles, an experience he himself was still raw from during the development of THE BROOD.<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Bad and fucked-up mommies,&rsquo; appalling and enthralling, are the heart of this grand fable of repulsion, shot by Cronenberg with frigid vehemence in the midst of his own divorce and child-custody anxieties. Shedding the grindhouse skin of the early films for a cool-clinical sheen, it exhumes the deformed feelings of relationships erected on circles of pain while locating a bruised new dignity in the characters caught in them.&rdquo; &ndash;Fernando Croce, CINEPASSION</p> Saturday, March 04 PASSAGE THROUGH: SOME SOUNDTRACKS FOR BRAKHAGE: PROGRAM 1: PASSAGE THROUGH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47079 <p>THE RIDDLE OF LUMEN (1972, 17 min, 16mm, silent)<br />&ldquo;My RIDDLE OF LUMEN depends on qualities of LIGHT. All films do, of course. But with THE RIDDLE OF LUMEN, the &lsquo;hero&rsquo; of the film is light / itself.&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.<br /><br />PASSAGE THROUGH: A RITUAL<br />(1990, 49 min, 16mm. Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive. Music by Philip Corner: &ldquo;Through the Mysterious Barricade (after F. Couperin) LUMEN 1 (for Stan Brakhage).&rdquo;)<br />&ldquo;[PASSAGE THROUGH] required the most exacting editing process ever; and in the course of that work it occurred to me that I&rsquo;d originally made THE RIDDLE OF LUMEN hoping someone would make an &lsquo;answering&rsquo; film and entertain my visual riddle in the manner of the riddling poets of yore. I most expected Hollis Frampton (because of ZORN&rsquo;S LEMMA) to pick up the challenge; but he never did. In some sense I think composer Corner has &ndash; and now we have this dance of riddles as music and film combine to make &lsquo;passage,&rsquo; in every sense of the word, further possible.&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.<br /><br />&ldquo;Six years ago, my whole life collapsed and I experienced psychodramatic sound combinations. I began working with composers again, and very rapidly came to a setting of picture to sound, so that in fact it was the sound then that would engender me to do pictures. The happiest combination has been PASSAGE THROUGH: A RITUAL set to music by Philip Corner.&rdquo; &ndash;Stan Brakhage, 2/6/93 at Millennium Film Workshop<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 70 min.</p> Saturday, March 04 HEAVY METAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46971 <p>Inspired by the adult fantasy magazine of the same name, itself based on a French iteration, METAL HURLANT, Potterton&rsquo;s film version of HEAVY METAL brings together talents from several animation studios around the world, for eight distinct animated segments. A mix of original stories and adaptations from the magazine, these episodes run the gamut from fantasy to horror to film noir, and their creators include Richard Corben, Bernie Wrightson, Dan O&rsquo;Bannon, Juan Gim&eacute;nez, and Jean &ldquo;Moebius&rdquo; Giraud (uncredited). Licensing issues related to the soundtrack kept it from home video for nearly two decades, but it&rsquo;s Hollywood veteran Elmer Bernstein&rsquo;s majestic orchestral score that is the film&rsquo;s true sonic highlight. Produced by Montreal&rsquo;s Ivan Reitman and featuring the voice talents of John Candy (Newmarket, ON), Eugene Levy (Hamilton, ON), and Harold Ramis.<br /><br />&ldquo;The most expensive adolescent fantasy revenge fulfillment wet dream ever to slither onto a screen.&rdquo; &ndash;Sheila Benson, LOS ANGELES TIMES</p> Saturday, March 04 TICKET TO HEAVEN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46994 <p>The winner of four Genie Awards, including Best Motion Picture, Best Actor (Nick Mancuso), and Best Supporting Actor (Saul Rubinek), TICKET TO HEAVEN is a harrowing docudrama about a depressed young man (Mancuso) who is swept up into a Moonie-like cult, and the efforts of his best friend (Rubinek) and a deprogrammer (R.H. Thomson) to bring him back to the outside world. Never have Meg Foster, as a particularly intense cult member, and her penetrating green eyes been better cast. Other players include a &ldquo;love-bombing&rdquo; Kim Cattrall, Guy Boyd, and Robert Joy. The film was based on the first-hand account of Josh Freed, who tried to save a friend and briefly entered Reverend Moon&rsquo;s Unification Church, and later wrote about it in his book MOONWEBS. Though relatively unknown, this utterly convincing sleeper is often referred to as the best narrative film about cults.<br /><br />&ldquo;What makes the movie absolutely spellbinding is that it shows us not only how [the protagonist] is recruited into the group, but how anyone could be indoctrinated into one of the many cults in America today. This is a movie that has done its research, and it is made with such artistry that we share the experience of the young man.&rdquo; &ndash;Roger Ebert, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES</p> Sunday, March 05 PASSAGE THROUGH: SOME SOUNDTRACKS FOR BRAKHAGE: PROGRAM 2: THE FAUST SERIES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47081 <p>FAUSTFILM: AN OPERA<br />(1987, 44 min, 16mm. Sound by Rick Corrigan.)<br />&ldquo;A collaboration between composer Rick Corrigan and Stan Brakhage, featuring Joel Haertling as Faust, Gretchen LeMaistre as Gretchen, Phillip Hathaway as Faust&rsquo;s friend, and Paul Lundahl as Servant. This is the realization of a 30-year-old-dream&hellip;a wish of the young filmmaker to film a &lsquo;modern&rsquo; Faust (quite opposite of the traditional Fausts) which finally came to a fulfillment as unpredictable and as absolute as, say, three decades of living experience.&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.<br /><br />FAUST&rsquo;S OTHER: AN IDYLL<br />(1988, 45 min, 16mm. Sound by Joel Haertling. Voice-over by Stan Brakhage.)<br />&ldquo;FAUST PART 2 reveals the modern Faust in a romantic interlude, an idyll (from the Greek idein, &lsquo;to see&rsquo;); also, a journey of the id. A sense of story is inferred through the complex interweaving of human gesture, expression, and bodily movement within vibrantly shifting colors and rhythmic development, creating multiple levels of metaphorical meaning. A collaborative work with paintings by Emily Ripley and soundtrack by Joel Haertling.&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.<br /><br />FAUST 3: CANDIDA ALBACORE<br />(1988, 26 min, 16mm. Sound by Rick Corrigan and Doll Parts.)<br />&ldquo;Just as the word &lsquo;Idyll&rsquo; of Faust&rsquo;s Part 2 is rooted in the Greek &lsquo;idein&rsquo; / &lsquo;to see,&rsquo; so is &lsquo;Candida&rsquo; in &lsquo;candidatus,&rsquo; as used in &lsquo;the white robed army of martyrs&rsquo; of the &lsquo;Te Deum,&rsquo; as well as &lsquo;Albicare&rsquo; / &lsquo;to be white&rsquo; or &lsquo;Albicore&rsquo; out of the Portuguese (of Arabic origin) designating a kind of tunny (or white tuna): thus, Faust&rsquo;s 3 is white / white as well as (from sugar&rsquo;s &lsquo;white&rsquo;) candy, and fish: it is the modern Walpurgisnacht to Faust, but the daydream of &lsquo;his&rsquo; Emily: it exists that a woman have, finally, something of her ritual included in the myth of Faust &hellip; and that &lsquo;muthos&rsquo; / &lsquo;mouth&rsquo; become a vision.&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.<br /><br />FAUST 4<br />(1989, 38 min, 16mm. Sound by Rick Corrigan.)<br />&ldquo;This is the imaged thought process of young Faust escaping the unbearable pictures of his broken romantic idyll, mentally fleeing the particulars of his dramatized &lsquo;love,&rsquo; Faust&rsquo;s mind ranging the geography of his upbringing and its structures of cultural hubris &ndash; the whole nervous system &lsquo;going to ground&rsquo; and finally &lsquo;becoming one&rsquo; with the hypnagogically visible cells of his receptive sight and inner cognition &hellip; all that I could give him of Heaven in this current visualization of these ancient themes.&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 155 min, with intermission.</p> Sunday, March 05 ROCK & RULE - Very rare Canadian version! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46975 <p><em><strong>PLEASE NOTE: The print screening here is of the original Canadian cut of ROCK &amp; RULE, which had been thought to be lost on 35mm and only available in poor video transfers! These screenings are not to be missed!</strong></em><br /><br />Rock &amp; Rule &copy; 1983 The Canada Trust Licensee, in Trust. NELVANA is a trademark of Nelvana Limited and is used under licence.&nbsp; All Rights Reserved.<br /><br />Coming hot on the heels of HEAVY METAL, as well as the films of Ralph Bakshi, ROCK &amp; RULE was one of the last in a wave of adult-oriented animated films released by the majors in the early 80s. Produced by fledgling Canadian animation studio Nelvana, the film is set in a post-apocalyptic future in which power-mad rock star Mok kidnaps punk singer Angel in order to use her voice to summon a demon. Several Canadian voice actors who appeared in HEAVY METAL return for ROCK &amp; RULE, and the singing voices include Debbie Harry (Angel), Lou Reed (Mok), Cheap Trick&rsquo;s Robin Zander (Omar), and Iggy Pop. Director Smith may be best known outside of ROCK &amp; RULE for his work on the animated segments for George Lucas&rsquo;s STAR WARS HOLIDAY SPECIAL.<br /><br />&ldquo;Sharp, funny, bizarre, and packed with catchy songs, it was inexplicably given the shaft by United Artists who dumped it into a handful of theaters and shuffled it off to home video and cable, where a generation of impressionable 80s kids managed to build up a cult following by word of mouth.&rdquo; &ndash;Nathaniel Thompson, MONDO DIGITAL</p> Sunday, March 05 BLACK CHRISTMAS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46961 <p>It was HALLOWEEN that jump-started the slasher craze of the late 70s and 80s, but the lesser-known BLACK CHRISTMAS deserves credit for being well ahead of that curve, as well as for being a superlative and infinitely creepy example of the genre. Made in Canada by American Clark, the film is set during the Christmas holiday season in a sorority house, as an unseen psychopath embarks on a brutal killing spree and torments his future victims via heavy-breathing phone calls. Clark eschews gore and clear shots of the killer, instead filming from the maniac&rsquo;s p.o.v. (before the technique became <em>de rigueur</em>), and builds tension with suggestion and an atmospheric wintry milieu. Olivia Hussey, John Saxon, Andrea Martin, and Keir Dullea star alongside Canadians Doug McGrath, Art Hindle, Lynne Griffin, and Margot Kidder.<br /><br />&ldquo;Much of the shtick used by Clark and screenwriter Roy Moore was later stolen both by countless hacks and at least one real artist (HALLOWEEN director John Carpenter), but few repeated Clark&rsquo;s most devious tactic, accompanying the violence with the sound of the killer&rsquo;s nerve-jangling maniacal shouting. In BLACK CHRISTMAS, the audience can&rsquo;t escape the horror by closing their eyes.&rdquo; &ndash;Noel Murray, ONION A.V. CLUB</p> Sunday, March 05 CLASS OF 1984 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46964 <p>&ldquo;Life is pain&hellip;pain is everything.&rdquo; A &ldquo;punk scare&rdquo; update on THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE, this gleefully sleazy iteration has idealistic new music teacher Perry King pitted against an especially sadistic gang of punkers, who lord it over their urban high school, led by the brilliant and charismatic Timothy Van Patten (now a top HBO director). While he cannot reach Van Patten and his acolytes, King does have friends, including pistol-packing science teacher Roddy McDowall and chubby-cheeked tuba player Michael J. Fox. The theme song is by Alice Cooper, the synth-rock score by Lalo Schifrin, and the screenplay co-written by Tom Holland (FRIGHT NIGHT and CHILD&rsquo;S PLAY). Notable Canadians in the cast include punk band Teenage Head and Canuxploitation vets Lisa Langlois, Stefan Arngrim, Al Waxman, and Keith Knight.<br /><br />&ldquo;CLASS OF 1984 is just a perfect exploitation movie. Originally slapped with an X rating, it&rsquo;s relentlessly seedy, overflowing with assault, suicide, racism, grimy sex, drug use, and crime crime crime, all of which is perpetrated by minors! Exaggerated or not, the gang practically wrote the textbook for countless delinquent groups that would terrorize big-screen high schools through the 80s and beyond.&rdquo; &ndash; Zach Carlson, DESTROY ALL MOVIES!!!</p> Monday, March 06 EC: CITIZEN KANE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47110 <p>&ldquo;Welles&rsquo;s first feature is probably the most respected, analyzed, and parodied of all films. Although its archival and historical value are unchallenged, CITIZEN KANE, nevertheless, seems fresh on each new viewing. The film touches on so many aspects of American life &ndash; politics and sex, friendship and betrayal, youth and old age &ndash; that it has become a film for all moods and generations. In its expansive way, it creates a kaleidoscopic panorama of a man&rsquo;s life. Loosely based on the life of the newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, CITIZEN KANE is the saga of the rise to power of a &lsquo;poor little rich boy&rsquo; starved for affection, as Welles himself was after his parents&rsquo; early deaths. It is also a meditation on emotional greed, the ease of amassing wealth, and the difficulty of sustaining love.&rdquo; &ndash;MoMA</p> Monday, March 06 SKIP TRACER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46988 <p>Dalen&rsquo;s rarely-seen directorial debut is lean and mean in the best possible way, an uncompromising character study about a driven and coolly effective debt collector (David Petersen, brilliant in his first film role) for a Vancouver loan agency. A perennial &ldquo;Man of the Year&rdquo; at his office, the film finds Petersen at something of a crossroads, as the pressures of his profession begin to wear him down. After some high-profile festival exposure, including the New York Film Festival in 1978, the film all but disappeared, resurfacing briefly in the 1980s for a VHS release under a different title. Owing to this slipshod release pattern, it&rsquo;s come to be regarded as one of the lost masterpieces of the Canadian tax shelter era.<br /><br />&ldquo;A downbeat film set in a seedy &lsquo;70s version of Vancouver where ubiquitous construction sites signal the oncoming wave of gentrification, the film falls between a noir and a western in tone &ndash; the latter especially fitting given that Dalen had abandoned an unproduced oater script to focus on SKIP TRACER.&rdquo; &ndash;Kier-La Janisse, OFF SCREEN</p> Monday, March 06 TAKING SHELTER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46978 <p>Breaking out of their imaginary purgatory and into temporal space, a disagreeable crew of aliens invade Canada, subjecting everyday life to the rules of cinema as a strategy for colonial domination.<br /><br />Fragments of 434 Canadian feature films from 1970-89 are folded into this found-footage feature, many of them scandalously rare, and most of them products of the tax shelter era. The strong narrative line both stands on its own and unpacks its subject on two levels: the literal content of the films it repurposes, and the political/industrial context from which they emerged. Merging the innovations of found-footage pioneers like Bruce Conner and Arthur Lipsett with the anarchic pop omnivorousness of YouTube mashup culture, TAKING SHELTER is a groundbreaking experiment in freestanding collage cinema &ndash; no voiceover or titling, no non-diagetic commentary, just repurposed image and sound. It jolts the formative years of Canadian feature filmmaking into the present with all the trimmings of the Hollywood productions these films yearned to emulate &ndash; it&rsquo;s funny, thrilling, and affecting.</p> <p><em>PLEASE NOTE: Filmmaker Jonathan Culp was planning to travel from Canada to present these screenings in person, but he has chosen to cancel his trip in protest against Donald Trump's proposed travel ban.&nbsp; Instead he has sent the following statement:</em><br /><br /><em>"Whatever each of us choose to actually do, there can be no business as usual right now. As thrilled as I have been for many months to attend these screenings, the travel ban crisis has tainted the enterprise, and I feel that the most useful action I can take is to boycott the Canada-US border until these matters are settled decisively.</em><br /><br /><em>"The Canadian films of the 1970s and 80s live in the shadow of American culture, as Canadians do generally. TAKING SHELTER portrays the cinema of this era - the good, the bad and the confusing - as a literal alien invasion, in which a generation of Canadian character actors suddenly find themselves attacked and colonized by the weaponized tools of cinema. I trust the film's paranoid themes, frantically accelerating pace, and general cognitive dissonance will strike familiar chords to anyone who can still bear to read the news.</em><br /><br /><em>"Organize, resist, watch movies."</em></p> Tuesday, March 07 NEW YORK FEMINIST FILM WEEK: PROGRAM 1: DISMANTLING ISLAMOPHOBIA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47084 <p><strong><em>The screening will be followed by a discussion with Jamila Hammami (Executive Director, Queer Detainee Empowerment Project) and Jasmina Sinanović (Director of Finance &amp; Administration, Center for LGBTQ Studies, CUNY), moderated by Joy C. Schaefer (Film Scholar; M.A. French Studies, NYU) and Sofia Varino (Social Researcher; M.A. Cultural Studies, Stony Brook).</em></strong><br /><br />This program aims to promote discussion about Islamophobia by focusing on the particular context of contemporary France. A documentary about Christine Delphy, the rare feminist voice of her generation to come out against the law banning &ldquo;ostentatious&rdquo; religious symbols from public schools in France, screens alongside a fiction film about a French Muslim teenager who must choose between school and her headscarf during this law&rsquo;s passing in 2004. Delphy, co-founder of <em>Questions F&eacute;ministes</em> with Simone de Beauvoir in 1977, is an openly lesbian French sociologist and materialist feminist. Her book, <em>Separate and Dominate</em>, works to dismantle the following interconnected issues: discrimination against LGBTQ+ folks, misogyny, Islamophobia, and racism in the French postcolonial context. The documentary about Delphy thus helps to contextualize the fiction film MARIAM, which addresses the themes of Islamophobia, the diversity of the Muslim experience, and the assimilation of Muslims in the West.<br /><br />Florence Tissot &amp; Sylvie Tissot<br />I&rsquo;M NOT A FEMINIST, BUT&hellip; / JE NE SUIS PAS F&Eacute;MINISTE, MAIS&hellip;<br />(2015, 52 min, digital. In French with English subtitles.)<br />&amp;<br />Faiza Ambah<br />MARIAM<br />(2015, 45 min, digital. In French with English subtitles.)</p> Tuesday, March 07 SUDDEN FURY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46997 <p>One-and-done director Damude delivers the goods with this tense and gritty backwoods drama-cum-Hitchcockian thriller, a lesser-known entry in the Canuxploitation canon. When a bickering couple crash their car in a remote rural area, the husband (Dominic Hogan), sensing a substantial insurance payout, leaves his wife (Gay Rowan) to die. But when a good samaritan (Dan Hennessey) arrives on the scene, an increasingly deadly game of cat and mouse ensues. Hollis McLaren and Sean McCann, who appear elsewhere in this series, round out the film&rsquo;s small cast.<br /><br />&ldquo;The slightly stilted, over-articulated acting of the early scenes could almost be a deliberate audience trap: soon enough the bottom drops out, quickly giving way to one of the finest and most affecting thrillers ever to come out of this country. Damude goes for Hitchcock gothic, taking the familiar motifs of guilt, desperation and mistaken identity and transposing them to the Ontario countryside.&rdquo; &ndash;Jonathan Culp, CINERTIA</p> Tuesday, March 07 NEW YORK FEMINIST FILM WEEK: PROGRAM 2: BODIES (International Women’s Day) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47086 <p><strong><em>Joey (formerly known as Gina) Carducci, Nona Faustine, Krissy Mahan, Patricia Silva, and Mila Zuo in person.<br /><br /></em></strong>The International Women&rsquo;s Day BODIES program looks at the body as a locus of cultural and political practice within contexts of violence, pleasure, and community. With still photographs that pay homage to Eadweard Muybridge, WALKING WITH FREDERICK DOUGLASS, LISPENARD ST retraces Douglass&rsquo;s steps of freedom, based on a quotation that places him at the exact location of Church and Lispenard Streets. ALL THAT SHELTERING EMPTINESS is a meditation on elevators, hotel lobbies, hundred dollar bills, the bathroom, a cab, chandeliers, cocktails, the receptionist, arousal, and other routines in the life of a NYC callboy. In UNTIL JUSTICE ROLLS&hellip;, butch dyke superhero action figure Faggotgirl and her friend creatively navigate the barriers of the NYC public transportation system. In CARNAL ORIENT, a cook serves up exotic dishes to his impatient, hungry guests, as the arrival of a mysterious Asian woman reignites their insatiable appetite. Filmed within one week after the Pulse nightclub shooting, WHOLESOME FEVERS is a feminist analysis of mourning within the emotional exile of social exclusion. BLACK IS BLUE tells the story of an African American transman who is forced to confront his pre-transition past, struggling to make his outside match his inside.<br /><br />Nona Faustine WALKING WITH FREDERICK DOUGLASS, LISPENARD ST. (2015, 1.5 min, digital)<br />Gina (now known as Joey) Carducci and Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore ALL THAT SHELTERING EMPTINESS (2010, 7 min, 16mm)<br />Krissy Mahan UNTIL JUSTICE ROLLS&hellip; (2014, 3.5 min, digital)<br />Mila Zuo CARNAL ORIENT (2015, 9 min, digital)<br />Patricia Silva WHOLESOME FEVERS (2016, 7 min, digital)<br />Cheryl Dunye BLACK IS BLUE (2014, 21 min, digital)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 55 min.</p> Wednesday, March 08 THE BROOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46985 <p>Following a brief detour into non-horror moviemaking that resulted in the racing drama FAST COMPANY, Cronenberg returned to the &lsquo;body horror&rsquo; sub-genre he pioneered, with one of his signature pictures, THE BROOD. Imported UK stars Oliver Reed, as a controversial psychotherapist, and Samantha Eggar, as his &lsquo;queen bee&rsquo; patient, appear alongside Canadian Art Hindle, as Eggar&rsquo;s estranged husband fighting her for custody of their young daughter. Reed encourages his patients to rid themselves of their mental illnesses by bringing about physiological changes in their bodies&hellip;leading to the spawning of a brood of murderous mutant children who act on Eggar&rsquo;s rages. Referring to the coincidence of its release in the same year as a far more mainstream take on similar topics, Cronenberg has called THE BROOD &ldquo;<em>my</em> version of KRAMER VS. KRAMER,&rdquo; while noting that that film&rsquo;s &ldquo;happy ending&rdquo; was a million miles away from his take on divorce and child custody battles, an experience he himself was still raw from during the development of THE BROOD.<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Bad and fucked-up mommies,&rsquo; appalling and enthralling, are the heart of this grand fable of repulsion, shot by Cronenberg with frigid vehemence in the midst of his own divorce and child-custody anxieties. Shedding the grindhouse skin of the early films for a cool-clinical sheen, it exhumes the deformed feelings of relationships erected on circles of pain while locating a bruised new dignity in the characters caught in them.&rdquo; &ndash;Fernando Croce, CINEPASSION</p> Wednesday, March 08 NEW YORK FEMINIST FILM WEEK: PROGRAM 3: TRANS/ACTION (International Women’s Day) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47088 <p><strong><em>Presented with Gender Reel Festival. Filmmaker Seyi Adebanjo will be here for a Q&amp;A!<br /><br /></em></strong>TRANS LIVES MATTER! JUSTICE FOR ISLAN NETTLES, which begins our International Women&rsquo;s Day TRANS/ACTION program, documents a community vigil for a transwoman of color, capturing the love and support of a community brought together to sustain each other. MY REFUGEE STORY was directed and produced by an LGBTIQ youth group, members of which share their firsthand experiences as women with non-conforming gender and/or sexual orientations living in Lebanon. KATE BORNSTEIN IS A QUEER AND PLEASANT DANGER is a documentary about trailblazing gender outlaw Kate Bornstein, who takes viewers on a mind-bending quest to dismantle expectations about gender and seek answers to the age-old question: What makes life worth living?<br /><br />Seyi Adebanjo TRANS LIVES MATTER! JUSTICE FOR ISLAN NETTLES (2014, 7 min, digital)<br />M. Nour Metwally MY REFUGEE STORY (2015, 17 min, digital)<br />&amp;<br />Sam Feder<br />KATE BORNSTEIN IS A QUEER AND PLEASANT DANGER<br />(2014, 55 min, digital)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Wednesday, March 08 HEAVY METAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-46972 <p>Inspired by the adult fantasy magazine of the same name, itself based on a French iteration, METAL HURLANT, Potterton&rsquo;s film version of HEAVY METAL brings together talents from several animation studios around the world, for eight distinct animated segments. A mix of original stories and adaptations from the magazine, these episodes run the gamut from fantasy to horror to film noir, and their creators include Richard Corben, Bernie Wrightson, Dan O&rsquo;Bannon, Juan Gim&eacute;nez, and Jean &ldquo;Moebius&rdquo; Giraud (uncredited). Licensing issues related to the soundtrack kept it from home video for nearly two decades, but it&rsquo;s Hollywood veteran Elmer Bernstein&rsquo;s majestic orchestral score that is the film&rsquo;s true sonic highlight. Produced by Montreal&rsquo;s Ivan Reitman and featuring the voice talents of John Candy (Newmarket, ON), Eugene Levy (Hamilton, ON), and Harold Ramis.<br /><br />&ldquo;The most expensive adolescent fantasy revenge fulfillment wet dream ever to slither onto a screen.&rdquo; &ndash;Sheila Benson, LOS ANGELES TIMES</p> Wednesday, March 08 GOIN’ DOWN THE ROAD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47039 <p>This low-budget wonder &ndash; produced with a $19,000 loan from the Canadian Film Development Corporation, supplemented by Shebib&rsquo;s own savings &ndash; began life as a documentary about the economic problems of East coast residents, but morphed into a fictional feature about two blue-collar drifters from Nova Scotia who head to Toronto to try their luck. A downbeat portrait of personal and economic futility, GOIN&rsquo; DOWN THE ROAD is nevertheless an exhilarating film, thanks to its deeply lived-in texture, its refusal to sentimentalize, and its palpable feel for the dynamics of working-class life. Despite the shoestring production, it proved immensely influential, giving rise to numerous documentary-inflected narrative features depicting characters on the economic fringes of society and helping to jump-start a distinctively Canadian independent film movement.<br /><br />&ldquo;GOIN&rsquo; DOWN THE ROAD feels at times like a film realization of Studs Terkel&rsquo;s HARD TIMES, until you remind yourself that the movie is fiction and the time is now. [&hellip;] The film&rsquo;s special accomplishment is its treatment of the characters and the city itself with an absolutely unsentimental level-headedness. It tells a story that contains joy, silliness, love and despair. But these things are kept organic to the story&hellip;. Shebib achieves a documentary objectivity that touches us more deeply than tear jerking could.&rdquo; &ndash;Roger Ebert</p> Thursday, March 09 NEW YORK FEMINIST FILM WEEK: PROGRAM 4: ECOFEMINISMS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47090 <p><strong><em>Maya Suess in person.<br /><br /></em></strong>QUEER ECOLOGIES uses stop motion animation and text to render questions about the current state of humanity by posing questions to a long-revered pseudo-mystical being: a mushroom. GOODBYE GAULEY MOUNTAIN chronicles the adventures of Beth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle, two ecosexuals in love raising performance art hell in West Virginia to help save the region from mountaintop removal destruction, climaxing with their wedding to the Appalachian Mountains.<br /><br />Maya Suess &amp; Atom Cianfarani QUEER ECOLOGIES (2014, 13 min, digital)<br />&amp;<br />Beth Stephens &amp; Annie Sprinkle<br />GOODBYE GAULEY MOUNTAIN: AN ECOSEXUAL LOVE STORY<br />(2015, 70 min, digital)</p> Thursday, March 09 THE APPRENTICE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47042 <p>(FLEUR BLEUE)<br /><br />With Steve Fiset, Susan Sarandon, and C&eacute;line Bernier.<br /><br />Another staunchly independent maker of sexually frank, often controversial Canadian narrative features, Larry Kent first made a name for himself with 1963&rsquo;s THE BITTER ASH, and faced the ire of the censors several years later with HIGH (1967). Co-produced by National Film Board documentary filmmaker Donald Brittain (present elsewhere on this calendar as co-director of LADIES AND GENTLEMEN&hellip;MR. LEONARD COHEN), THE APPRENTICE is arguably the first fully bilingual film to see commercial release in Canada. It is a portrait of a young French Canadian torn between a separatist francophone girlfriend and an anglophone model (played by a young Susan Sarandon in only her second feature film).<br /><br />&ldquo;[A] wondrous, far-too-often overlooked film&hellip;THE APPRENTICE incorporates many of the best elements of Kent&rsquo;s style, showing us his characters in all their flawed glory. [&hellip;] [It] has a damn-the-torpedoes, genre-busting chutzpah about it, with elements of romantic and screwball comedies, heist movies and lusty sex romps all thrown into the mix.&rdquo; &ndash;Matthew Hays, POINT OF VIEW</p> Thursday, March 09 MONTREAL MAIN - Filmmakers in person! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47045 <p>With Frank Vitale, Allan Moyle, and Stephen Lack.<br /><br />&ldquo;Allan Moyle and Frank Vitale had met as students at Montreal&rsquo;s McGill University before both ending up in New York, to soak up the newly-alternative &rsquo;60s atmosphere typified by Warhol, as well as the underground film tradition of Amos Vogel&rsquo;s Cinema 16, and the more recent Film-Maker&rsquo;s Co-Operative and Cinematheque, spearheaded by Jonas Mekas. When the pair returned to Montreal, they fell in with the St Laurent crowd, and started a free-wheeling art gallery. It seemed no great leap for Vitale to set to making a film more or less documenting their surroundings. Written by Vitale, Moyle, and local personality Stephen Lack, MONTREAL MAIN has little pretense to narrative, more concerned with portraying the milieu and way of life. [&hellip;] Quite aside from the subject matter&hellip;the film was significant for its unprecedented form, described by Cinema Canada magazine, as &lsquo;Imaginary Documentary,&rsquo; the free-flowing, partly truth and partly fiction, self-portrait of a subcultural community theretofore unseen on screen.&rdquo; &ndash; Tom Newth, POPOPTIQ<br /><br />&ldquo;Vitale&rsquo;s first feature was the most honest film about male sexuality made to date&hellip;which is to say that it&rsquo;s both troubled and troubling, in the most positive sense. It centers on a character called Frank Vitale, an unemployed artist-photographer, and his circle of (predominantly gay) friends. Frank&rsquo;s closest friend is Bozo; they have a disastrously furtive attempt at sex together at one point, although neither considers himself gay. But their friendship, and Frank&rsquo;s life in general, threatens to fall apart when Frank meets the 12-year-old Johnny and in some sense falls in love with him. It&rsquo;s impossible to be more explicit about it, since the film itself isn&rsquo;t. In fact, hardly anything happens in the way of reportable incident: it plays as a stream of modest encounters and conversations, which seem like improvisations. Brilliant casting, photography, and especially editing, however, give the whole movie an acute psychological focus.&rdquo; &ndash;TIME OUT<br /><br />&ldquo;Full of equivocal relationships, MONTREAL MAIN constructs a world of moral ambivalence. On one level, it is a love story, exploring, as Natalie Edwards wrote at the time, &lsquo;the diversity of sexuality, the shades and shifts lying inherent and unacknowledged in all people.&rsquo; On another level, it extends outwards towards allegory &ndash; towards a philosophical investigation of the world. [&hellip;] MONTREAL MAIN is an extraordinary film. Naturalistic in appearance, it has the air of making itself up as it goes along. Yet every image in the film and every element of its style possess the resonance of metaphor.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Harcourt<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Frank Vitale and star Stephen Lack will be here in person for both screenings!</em></strong></p> Friday, March 10 NEW YORK FEMINIST FILM WEEK: PROGRAM 5: FEMINIST FILM GENEALOGIES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47092 <p><strong><em>Barbara Hammer, Constanza Mirr&eacute;, and Patricia Silva in person.<br /><br /></em></strong>In 1946, Maya Deren booked the Provincetown Playhouse in NYC to show her program titled &ldquo;Three Abandoned Films&rdquo; for several evenings. The FEMINIST FILM GENEALOGIES program places that historical film event in the context of wider filmmaking and exhibition practices, finding connections among generations of feminist filmmakers who engage with and expand the language of experimental cinema. Barbara Hammer&rsquo;s MAYA DEREN&rsquo;S SINK explores Deren&rsquo;s concepts of space, time, and form through visits and projections filmed in her L.A. and N.Y. homes. Incorporating Deren&rsquo;s aesthetics and inspired by Hammer, Patricia Silva&rsquo;s SELF AND OTHERS is a formal study of some of the earliest modern images of bisexual culture, and its complex structure of recognition. Agn&egrave;s Varda&rsquo;s L&rsquo;OP&Eacute;RA MOUFFE is the visual diary of a pregnant woman in the rue Mouffetard neighborhood of Paris; it influences Constanza Mirr&eacute;&rsquo;s ROSEMARY&rsquo;S STREET, which offers a glimpse of life in a Dominican community still living on a few non-gentrified blocks in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.<br /><br />Maya Deren AT LAND (1944, 15 min, 16mm)<br />Barbara Hammer MAYA DEREN&rsquo;S SINK (2011, 30 min, digital)<br />Patricia Silva SELF AND OTHERS (2015, 6 min, digital)<br />Agn&egrave;s Varda L&rsquo;OP&Eacute;RA MOUFFE (1958, 16 min, 35mm-to-DCP)<br />Constanza Mirr&eacute; ROSEMARY&rsquo;S STREET (2013, 17 min, digital)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 90 min.</p> Friday, March 10 THE RUBBER GUN - star Stephen Lack in person! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47048 <p>With Allan Moyle and Stephen Lack.<br /><br />Three years after the release of MONTREAL MAIN, its makers &ndash; Frank Vitale, Allan Moyle, and Stephen Lack &ndash; reunited to produce THE RUBBER GUN, this time with Vitale as DP and Moyle in the director&rsquo;s chair. Once again the actors ostensibly play themselves, but this time that conceit is driven to its breaking point, with the protagonists comprising a tight-knit band of drug-smugglers. The narrative is organized around a police stakeout of a subway station locker containing a stash of the group&rsquo;s drugs, while the film&rsquo;s narrator &ndash; played by Moyle himself &ndash; is a McGill University sociology student fascinated by, and increasingly drawn in by, the group and its leader, Steve (played by Lack). Sharing the earlier film&rsquo;s ambiguous mixture of fiction and reality, THE RUBBER GUN is an equally inventive and daring film that remains as unique today as it was upon its release.<br /><br />&ldquo;THE RUBBER GUN is being advertised as &lsquo;a strange movie,&rsquo; and it certainly is that: It&rsquo;s a drama that feels like a documentary, a series of episodes that at first seem entirely disconnected, a story so steeped in drug culture that it&rsquo;s hard to tell the characters&rsquo; lucid moments from their idle mutterings. Strangest of all, THE RUBBER GUN is a movie that can be enjoyed even when it isn&rsquo;t understandable.&rdquo; &ndash;Janet Maslin, NEW YORK TIMES<br /><br /><em><strong>Star Stephen Lack will be here in person for both screenings!</strong></em></p> Friday, March 10 NEW YORK FEMINIST FILM WEEK: PROGRAM 6: FEMINIST FILM GENEALOGIES ROUNDTABLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47094 <p>With Signe Baumane, Joey (formerly known as Gina) Carducci, Nona Faustine, Barbara Hammer, Krissy Mahan, Constanza Mirr&eacute;, Joanna Rytel, Maya Suess, Patricia Silva, and Mila Zuo.</p> Saturday, March 11 THE APPRENTICE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47043 <p>(FLEUR BLEUE)<br /><br />With Steve Fiset, Susan Sarandon, and C&eacute;line Bernier.<br /><br />Another staunchly independent maker of sexually frank, often controversial Canadian narrative features, Larry Kent first made a name for himself with 1963&rsquo;s THE BITTER ASH, and faced the ire of the censors several years later with HIGH (1967). Co-produced by National Film Board documentary filmmaker Donald Brittain (present elsewhere on this calendar as co-director of LADIES AND GENTLEMEN&hellip;MR. LEONARD COHEN), THE APPRENTICE is arguably the first fully bilingual film to see commercial release in Canada. It is a portrait of a young French Canadian torn between a separatist francophone girlfriend and an anglophone model (played by a young Susan Sarandon in only her second feature film).<br /><br />&ldquo;[A] wondrous, far-too-often overlooked film&hellip;THE APPRENTICE incorporates many of the best elements of Kent&rsquo;s style, showing us his characters in all their flawed glory. [&hellip;] [It] has a damn-the-torpedoes, genre-busting chutzpah about it, with elements of romantic and screwball comedies, heist movies and lusty sex romps all thrown into the mix.&rdquo; &ndash;Matthew Hays, POINT OF VIEW</p> Saturday, March 11 NEW YORK FEMINIST FILM WEEK: PROGRAM 7: HOMAGE TO BARBARA HAMMER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47096 <p><strong><em>Barbara Hammer and Joey (formerly known as Gina) Carducci in person.<br /><br /></em></strong>This program pays homage to queer cinema pioneer Barbara Hammer in the context of the theme of feminist film genealogies by placing two of Hammer&rsquo;s films beside a work by her mentee, Joey (formerly known as Gina) Carducci, and a film they made together. Hammer&rsquo;s DYKETACTICS articulates lesbian desire and sexuality through the physicality of the female body and the materiality of the film medium. NITRATE KISSES weaves striking images of four gay and lesbian couples with footage of an unearthed forbidden and invisible history. In A VIDEO LETTER TO BARBARA HAMMER, Carducci comes out as transgender to Hammer, his mentor and friend, placing transmasculinity in the context of feminist and queer politics. Their collaborative film, GENERATIONS, is about mentoring and passing on the tradition of personal experimental filmmaking. Hammer, 70 years old, hands the camera to Carducci, a young queer filmmaker. As they shoot during the last days of Astroland at Coney Island, the filmmakers find that the amusement park architecture and the emulsion of the film medium itself echo the inevitable fact of aging.<br /><br />Barbara Hammer DYKETACTICS (1974, 4 min, 16mm)<br /><br />Barbara Hammer<br />NITRATE KISSES<br />(1992, 67 min, 16mm)<br /><br />Joey (formerly known as Gina) Carducci A VIDEO LETTER TO BARBARA HAMMER (2016, 16 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br /><br />Barbara Hammer and Gina (now known as Joey) Carducci GENERATIONS (2010, 30 min, 16mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 120 min.</p> Saturday, March 11 GOIN’ DOWN THE ROAD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47040 <p>This low-budget wonder &ndash; produced with a $19,000 loan from the Canadian Film Development Corporation, supplemented by Shebib&rsquo;s own savings &ndash; began life as a documentary about the economic problems of East coast residents, but morphed into a fictional feature about two blue-collar drifters from Nova Scotia who head to Toronto to try their luck. A downbeat portrait of personal and economic futility, GOIN&rsquo; DOWN THE ROAD is nevertheless an exhilarating film, thanks to its deeply lived-in texture, its refusal to sentimentalize, and its palpable feel for the dynamics of working-class life. Despite the shoestring production, it proved immensely influential, giving rise to numerous documentary-inflected narrative features depicting characters on the economic fringes of society and helping to jump-start a distinctively Canadian independent film movement.<br /><br />&ldquo;GOIN&rsquo; DOWN THE ROAD feels at times like a film realization of Studs Terkel&rsquo;s HARD TIMES, until you remind yourself that the movie is fiction and the time is now. [&hellip;] The film&rsquo;s special accomplishment is its treatment of the characters and the city itself with an absolutely unsentimental level-headedness. It tells a story that contains joy, silliness, love and despair. But these things are kept organic to the story&hellip;. Shebib achieves a documentary objectivity that touches us more deeply than tear jerking could.&rdquo; &ndash;Roger Ebert</p> Saturday, March 11 THE RUBBER GUN - star Stephen Lack in person! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47049 <p>With Allan Moyle and Stephen Lack.<br /><br />Three years after the release of MONTREAL MAIN, its makers &ndash; Frank Vitale, Allan Moyle, and Stephen Lack &ndash; reunited to produce THE RUBBER GUN, this time with Vitale as DP and Moyle in the director&rsquo;s chair. Once again the actors ostensibly play themselves, but this time that conceit is driven to its breaking point, with the protagonists comprising a tight-knit band of drug-smugglers. The narrative is organized around a police stakeout of a subway station locker containing a stash of the group&rsquo;s drugs, while the film&rsquo;s narrator &ndash; played by Moyle himself &ndash; is a McGill University sociology student fascinated by, and increasingly drawn in by, the group and its leader, Steve (played by Lack). Sharing the earlier film&rsquo;s ambiguous mixture of fiction and reality, THE RUBBER GUN is an equally inventive and daring film that remains as unique today as it was upon its release.<br /><br />&ldquo;THE RUBBER GUN is being advertised as &lsquo;a strange movie,&rsquo; and it certainly is that: It&rsquo;s a drama that feels like a documentary, a series of episodes that at first seem entirely disconnected, a story so steeped in drug culture that it&rsquo;s hard to tell the characters&rsquo; lucid moments from their idle mutterings. Strangest of all, THE RUBBER GUN is a movie that can be enjoyed even when it isn&rsquo;t understandable.&rdquo; &ndash;Janet Maslin, NEW YORK TIMES<br /><br /><em><strong>Star Stephen Lack will be here in person for both screenings!</strong></em></p> Sunday, March 12 NEW YORK FEMINIST FILM WEEK: PROGRAM 8: ANIMATING FEMINISMS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47098 <p><strong><em>Signe Baumane and Joanna Rytel in person.<br /><br /></em></strong>This program pairs two feminist animators who explore women&rsquo;s sexuality and mental illness without bounds. In Joanna Rytel&rsquo;s claymation film, MOMS ON FIRE, two pregnant women find much needed relief in each other, while in Signe Baumane&rsquo;s BIRTH a young woman afraid of giving birth becomes even more frightened when she seeks advice from older women. Baumane&rsquo;s ROCKS IN MY POCKETS is based on true events involving five women in the filmmaker&rsquo;s family, including herself, and their battles with depression and suicide. The animated feature raises questions about how family genetics determine who we are and if it is possible to outsmart one&rsquo;s own DNA. It is an animated tale full of art, women, strange daring stories, Latvian accents, history, nature, adventure, and more.<br /><br />Joanna Rytel MOMS ON FIRE (2016, 13 min, digital)<br />Signe Baumane BIRTH (2009, 4 min, digital)<br />&amp;<br />Signe Baumane<br />ROCKS IN MY POCKETS<br />(2013, 89 min, digital)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 110 min.</p> Sunday, March 12 MONTREAL MAIN - Filmmakers in person! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=03&year=2017#showing-47046 <p>With Frank Vitale, Allan Moyle, and Stephen Lack.<br /><br />&ldquo;Allan Moyle and Frank Vitale had met as students at Montreal&rsquo;s McGill University before both ending up in New York, to soak up the newly-alternative &rsquo;60s atmosphere typified by Warhol, as well as the underground film tradition of Amos Vogel&rsquo;s Cinema 16, and the more recent Film-Maker&rsquo;s Co-Operative and Cinematheque, spearheaded by Jonas Mekas. When the pair returned to Montreal, they fell in with the St Laurent crowd, and started a free-wheeling art gallery. It seemed no great leap for Vitale to set to making a film more or less documenting their surroundings. Written by Vitale, Moyle, and local personality Stephen Lack, MONTREAL MAIN has little pretense to narrative, more concerned with portraying the milieu and way of life. [&hellip;] Quite aside from the subject matter&hellip;the film was significant for its unprecedented form, described by Cinema Canada magazine, as &lsquo;Imaginary Documentary,&rsquo; the free-flowing, partly truth and partly fiction, self-portrait of a subcultural community theretofore unseen on screen.&rdquo; &ndash; Tom Newth, POPOPTIQ<br /><br />&ldquo;Vitale&rsquo;s first feature was the most honest film about male sexuality made to date&hellip;which is to say that it&rsquo;s both troubled and troubling, in the most positive sense. It centers on a character called Frank Vitale, an unemployed artist-photographer, and his circle of (predominantly gay) friends. Frank&rsquo;s closest friend is Bozo; they have a disastrously furtive attempt at sex together at one point, although neither considers himself gay. But their friendship, and Frank&rsquo;s life in general, threatens to fall apart when Frank meets the 12-year-old Johnny and in some sense falls in love with him. It&rsquo;s impossible to be more explicit about it, since the film itself isn&rsquo;t. In fact, hardly anything happens in the way of reportable incident: it plays as a stream of modest encounters and conversations, which seem like improvisations. Brilliant casting, photography, and especially editing, however, give the whole movie an acute psychological focus.&rdquo; &ndash;TIME OUT<br /><br />&ldquo;Full of equivocal relationships, MONTREAL MAIN constructs a world of moral ambivalence. On one level, it is a love story, exploring, as Natalie Edwards wrote at the time, &lsquo;the diversity of sexuality, the shades and shifts lying inherent and unacknowledged in all people.&rsquo; On another level, it extends outwards towards allegory &ndash; towards a philosophical investigation of the world. [&hellip;] MONTREAL MAIN is an extraordinary film. Naturalistic in appearance, it has the air of making itself up as it goes along. Yet every image in the film and every element of its style possess the resonance of metaphor.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Harcourt<br /><br /><strong><em>Director Frank Vitale and star Stephen Lack will be here in person for both screenings!</em></strong></p> Sunday, March 12