Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Thu, 30 Jun 2016 06:21:44 -0400 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46055 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Friday, July 01 STAR SPANGLED TO DEATH, PARTS 1 & 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45983 <p>&ldquo;An epic film shot for hundreds of dollars! Combining found-films with my own more-or-less staged filming, it pictures a stolen and dangerously sold-out America, allowing examples of popular culture to self-indict. Racial and religious insanity, monopolization of wealth and the purposeful dumbing down of citizens and addiction to war oppose a Beat playfulness. A handful of artists costumed and performing unconvincingly appeal to audience imagination and understanding to complete the picture. Jack Smith&rsquo;s pre-FLAMING CREATURES performance as The Spirit Not Of Life But Of Living (the movie has raggedly cosmic pretensions), celebrating Suffering (rattled impoverished artist Jerry Sims) at the crux of sentient existence, is a visitation of the divine.&rdquo; &ndash;K.J.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ken Jacobs&rsquo;s monumental, monstrous STAR SPANGLED TO DEATH&hellip;is a [seven-plus-hour] assemblage of found audio-visual material ranging from political campaign films to animated cartoons to children&rsquo;s phonograph records, interwoven with gloriously eccentric original footage shot mainly on the streets (and in the dumps) of late-50s New York. [&hellip;] The movie is a vast, ironic pageant of 20th-century American history and consciousness. Fantastic street theater alternates with classroom hygiene films or dated studies of behavioral modification; Jacobs&rsquo;s performers, notably the young Jack Smith, hobnob with Mickey Mouse, Al Jolson, and American presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to George W. Bush. Obsession overflows as Jacobs&rsquo;s private mythology and outspoken cultural criticism merge with relentless documentation of America&rsquo;s ongoing military mobilization and institutionalized racism. [&hellip;] As a work of art, STAR SPANGLED TO DEATH has as much in common with the Watts Towers or the Barnes Foundation as with cinema as we know it&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE</p> Saturday, July 02 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46056 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Sunday, July 03 STAR SPANGLED TO DEATH, PARTS 3 & 4 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45985 <p>&ldquo;An epic film shot for hundreds of dollars! Combining found-films with my own more-or-less staged filming, it pictures a stolen and dangerously sold-out America, allowing examples of popular culture to self-indict. Racial and religious insanity, monopolization of wealth and the purposeful dumbing down of citizens and addiction to war oppose a Beat playfulness. A handful of artists costumed and performing unconvincingly appeal to audience imagination and understanding to complete the picture. Jack Smith&rsquo;s pre-FLAMING CREATURES performance as The Spirit Not Of Life But Of Living (the movie has raggedly cosmic pretensions), celebrating Suffering (rattled impoverished artist Jerry Sims) at the crux of sentient existence, is a visitation of the divine.&rdquo; &ndash;K.J.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ken Jacobs&rsquo;s monumental, monstrous STAR SPANGLED TO DEATH&hellip;is a [seven-plus-hour] assemblage of found audio-visual material ranging from political campaign films to animated cartoons to children&rsquo;s phonograph records, interwoven with gloriously eccentric original footage shot mainly on the streets (and in the dumps) of late-50s New York. [&hellip;] The movie is a vast, ironic pageant of 20th-century American history and consciousness. Fantastic street theater alternates with classroom hygiene films or dated studies of behavioral modification; Jacobs&rsquo;s performers, notably the young Jack Smith, hobnob with Mickey Mouse, Al Jolson, and American presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to George W. Bush. Obsession overflows as Jacobs&rsquo;s private mythology and outspoken cultural criticism merge with relentless documentation of America&rsquo;s ongoing military mobilization and institutionalized racism. [&hellip;] As a work of art, STAR SPANGLED TO DEATH has as much in common with the Watts Towers or the Barnes Foundation as with cinema as we know it&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE</p> Sunday, July 03 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46057 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Monday, July 04 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46058 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Monday, July 04 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46059 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Tuesday, July 05 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46060 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Tuesday, July 05 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46061 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, July 06 PETIT À PETIT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46046 <p>(LITTLE BY LITTLE)<br /><br />ENCORE SCREENINGS! <br /><br />In April, as part of the series &ldquo;Entangled Forms,&rdquo; Anthology presented a single screening of the four-hour version of Jean Rouch&rsquo;s post-&rsquo;68 epic, PETIT &Agrave; PETIT, which until then had only circulated in the U.S. in its &lsquo;commercial&rsquo; 90-minute edit. Considering the rarity of this version of the film, and the effort that went into translating and subtitling it for the earlier show, we&rsquo;ve decided to bring it back for a couple encore screenings, before the 16mm print makes its return journey back to France.<br /><br />&ldquo;Made in collaboration with Damour&eacute; Zika, Lam Ibrahima Dia, Illo Gaudel, and Tallou Mouzourane, and featuring filmmaker Safi Faye, the film channels Montesquieu&rsquo;s 1721 epistolary novel, PERSIAN LETTERS. Zika and Dia play 20th-century versions of Montesquieu&rsquo;s protagonists Rica and Usbek, coming to France to determine whether it can provide viable models for African life. This four-year project, which Rivette cited as the decisive influence on OUT 1, was a fearless experiment in duration-based improvisation and a crucial pivot between Rouch&rsquo;s earlier ethno-fictions and the sync-sound work of the 70s, 80s, and 90s. It was also completely out of phase with its time, working between cultural contexts at a moment when the borders between them had solidified, and eliding practical politics in favor of a political imaginary. The long cut is a revelation, restoring rhythm, detail, and complexity to a work which always involved far more than its plot.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam Di Iorio</p> Wednesday, July 06 PETIT À PETIT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46047 <p>(LITTLE BY LITTLE)<br /><br />ENCORE SCREENINGS! <br /><br />In April, as part of the series &ldquo;Entangled Forms,&rdquo; Anthology presented a single screening of the four-hour version of Jean Rouch&rsquo;s post-&rsquo;68 epic, PETIT &Agrave; PETIT, which until then had only circulated in the U.S. in its &lsquo;commercial&rsquo; 90-minute edit. Considering the rarity of this version of the film, and the effort that went into translating and subtitling it for the earlier show, we&rsquo;ve decided to bring it back for a couple encore screenings, before the 16mm print makes its return journey back to France.<br /><br />&ldquo;Made in collaboration with Damour&eacute; Zika, Lam Ibrahima Dia, Illo Gaudel, and Tallou Mouzourane, and featuring filmmaker Safi Faye, the film channels Montesquieu&rsquo;s 1721 epistolary novel, PERSIAN LETTERS. Zika and Dia play 20th-century versions of Montesquieu&rsquo;s protagonists Rica and Usbek, coming to France to determine whether it can provide viable models for African life. This four-year project, which Rivette cited as the decisive influence on OUT 1, was a fearless experiment in duration-based improvisation and a crucial pivot between Rouch&rsquo;s earlier ethno-fictions and the sync-sound work of the 70s, 80s, and 90s. It was also completely out of phase with its time, working between cultural contexts at a moment when the borders between them had solidified, and eliding practical politics in favor of a political imaginary. The long cut is a revelation, restoring rhythm, detail, and complexity to a work which always involved far more than its plot.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam Di Iorio</p> Thursday, July 07 ONTIC ANTICS STARRING LAUREL AND HARDY: BYE, MOLLY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45987 <p>ONTIC ANTICS extends Jacobs&rsquo;s ongoing exploration of the teeming depths of life contained within individual frames of film. In the first section of this three-part film, he radically reworks a sequence from Laurel and Hardy&rsquo;s BERTH MARKS (1929), so that they end up flipping and twirling around each other. The second section plays back the original film in its entirety, demonstrating how movement, space, and time have been radically transformed by Jacobs&rsquo;s intervention. In the final part of the film, the iconic images of Laurel and Hardy struggle to resolve themselves against the prominence of the digital pixels, heightened by the Pulfrich 3D technique.<br /><br />&ldquo;Hardy walked a thin line between playing heavy and playing fatty. Laurel adopted a retarded squint, with suggestions of idiot savant. Their characters were at sea, clinging to each other as industrial capitalism was breaking up and sinking. Beautiful losers, they kept it funny, buoying our spirits. Laurel and Hardy&hellip;forever.&rdquo; &ndash;K.J.</p> Friday, July 08 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45932 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Friday, July 08 TWO WRENCHING DEPARTURES http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45989 <p>In October 1989, estranged friends Bob Fleischner and Jack Smith died within a week of each other. Ken Jacobs met Smith through Fleischner in 1955 at CUNY night school, where the three were studying camera techniques. This feature-length work, first performed in 1989 as a live Nervous System piece is a &ldquo;luminous threnody&rdquo; (Mark McElhatten) made in response to the loss of Jacobs&rsquo;s friends.</p> Friday, July 08 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45933 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Friday, July 08 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45934 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Saturday, July 09 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45935 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Saturday, July 09 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45936 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Saturday, July 09 EC: TOM, TOM, THE PIPER’S SON http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46065 <p>An absolute masterpiece from one of the most inspiring innovators of modern cinema. <br />&ldquo;Original 1905 film shot and probably directed by G.W. &lsquo;Billy&rsquo; Bitzer, rescued via a paper print filed for copyright purposes with the Library of Congress. It is most reverently examined here, absolutely loved, with a new movie, almost as a side effect, coming into being.&rdquo; &ndash;K.J.</p> Sunday, July 10 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45937 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Sunday, July 10 KEN JACOBS: SHORT FILMS, PROGRAM 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45991 <p>PERFECT FILM (1986, 22 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />THE DOCTOR&rsquo;S DREAM (1977, 24 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. Preserved by SUNY Binghamton through the Avant-Garde Masters program funded by The Film Foundation and administered by the National Film Preservation Foundation.)<br />KEATON&rsquo;S COPS (1991, 23 min, 16mm)<br />GLOBE (1969, 22 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives through the Avant-Garde Masters Program funded by The Film Foundation and administered by the National Film Preservation Foundation.)<br />HIS FAVORITE WIFE IMPROVED (2008, 2 min, digital)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.</p> Sunday, July 10 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45938 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Sunday, July 10 KEN JACOBS: SHORT FILMS, PROGRAM 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45993 <p>DISORIENT EXPRESS (1996, 30 min, digital, b&amp;w, silent)<br />NEW YORK STREET TROLLEYS 1900 (1999, 10.5 min, digital, b&amp;w)<br />HANKY PANKY JANUARY 1902 (2006, 1 min, digital, silent)<br />WHAT HAPPENED ON 23RD STREET IN 1901 (2009, 13.5 min, digital, b&amp;w, silent)<br />PUSHCARTS OF ETERNITY STREET (2006, 10.5 min, digital, b&amp;w, silent)<br />THE PUSHCARTS LEAVE ETERNITY STREET (2010, 13 min, digital, b&amp;w. Music by David Moss.)<br />NYMPH (2007, 2 min, digital, silent)<br />THE SURGING SEA OF HUMANITY (2006, 10.5 min, digital, silent)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.</p> Sunday, July 10 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45939 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Sunday, July 10 tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE: PROGRAM 1: 17 SELECTED SHORTS: SUMMER, 1977 – DECEMBER, 2014 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46049 <p>FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Coming to us from Pittsburgh, PA, tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE is the greatest Sprocket Scientist alive according to absolutely no-one. That&rsquo;s quite a rep to live up to. Don&rsquo;t worry about it. Worry, instead, about the possibility of missing his 2 programs, he&rsquo;s not planning to live forever no matter how many attractive offers he gets along those lines. He&rsquo;s made 422 movies &amp; that ain&rsquo;t the half of it. Don&rsquo;t expect &lsquo;beautiful&rsquo; hi-def movies lacking content but abounding in budgets. Expect movies so packed with conceptual loudness that you&rsquo;ll be hi-def-ened without having a single voice raised.<br /><br />tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE is one stubborn cuss, too much to mishandle, &amp; three&rsquo;s a crowd. Making matters worse, he&rsquo;ll present not 3 but SEVENTEEN shorts from a 37-year period starting with COMPUTER INTERVIEW (1977) &amp; ending with I WOULDN&rsquo;T MAKE A MOVIE LIKE THIS IF YOU FUCKING PAID ME. (2014). One could say that these are a bit off &ndash; as in he bit off more than he could eschew.<br /><br />COMPUTER INTERVIEW (w/Steve Estes) (1977, 3.5 min, digital)<br />3 MILE ISLAND (w/B.O.M.B.) (1979, 4 min, digital)<br />PAPER DOLLS IN DAVA&rsquo;S CLASS (1981, 2.5 min, digital)<br />A DOUBLE NEGATIVE AS NOT A POSITIVE (w/Hannah Aviva) (1982, 2 min, 8mm-to-digital)<br />NEOIST GUIDE DOG (w/Litvinov) (1984, 2.5 min, Super 8mm-to-digital)<br />BALLING TIM ORE IS BEST (w/Dick Hertz) (1985, 16 min, Super 8mm-to-digital)<br />PHILOSOPHER&rsquo;S UNION MEMBER&rsquo;S MOUTHPIECE: RICHARD TRYZNO ELLSBERRY (1988, 6 min, digital)<br />A CUE STICK GUITAR DUET (w/Neil Feather) (1992, 3.5 min, digital)<br />NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE DOCUMENTARY (1993, 3.5 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />DISZEY SPOTS (1993-95, 11.5 min, digital)<br />DEPARTMENT OF FAILURES (1995, 2.5 min, digital)<br />HOW ORGONE CINEMA TREATS ITS VISITING FILMMAKERS (1995, 5.5 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />BACKGROUND MOVIE 2 (w/etta cetera &amp; Dave Lahn) (1997, 1.5 min, digital)<br />ANTI-NEOIST RALLY (w/etta cetera &amp; Karen Eliot) (2000, 2 min, digital)<br />HARPS &amp; ANGLES (w/Michael Pestel) (2003, 28.5 min, digital)<br />MULTIPLE PROJECTIONS (1978-2009, 10 min, digital)<br />I WOULDN&rsquo;T MAKE A MOVIE LIKE THIS IF YOU FUCKING PAID ME. (2014, 9 min, digital)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 120 min.</p> Monday, July 11 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45940 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Monday, July 11 tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE: PROGRAM 2: THIS WILL EXPLAIN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46051 <p>FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Coming to us from Pittsburgh, PA, tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE is the greatest Sprocket Scientist alive according to absolutely no-one. That&rsquo;s quite a rep to live up to. Don&rsquo;t worry about it. Worry, instead, about the possibility of missing his 2 programs, he&rsquo;s not planning to live forever no matter how many attractive offers he gets along those lines. He&rsquo;s made 422 movies &amp; that ain&rsquo;t the half of it. Don&rsquo;t expect &lsquo;beautiful&rsquo; hi-def movies lacking content but abounding in budgets. Expect movies so packed with conceptual loudness that you&rsquo;ll be hi-def-ened without having a single voice raised.<br /><br />&ldquo;Blaster&rdquo; Al Ackerman probably wasn&rsquo;t one of the 14 Secret Masters of the World but he certainly had more than 14 identities &amp; all of them were tricksters. He was born (1939), he lived, he was a copious correspondent of a very personal nature, a cartoonist, a philosopher, &amp; the funniest damn experimental writer of All Zeim. He also died (2013). This will explain.</p> Monday, July 11 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46071 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Monday, July 11 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46072 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Tuesday, July 12 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45941 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Tuesday, July 12 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46062 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, July 13 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-45942 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Wednesday, July 13 MEN GO TO BATTLE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=07&year=2016#showing-46073 <p>NYC THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Written by Zachary Treitz &amp; Kate Lyn Sheil. With Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Kate Lyn Sheil, Steve Coulter, Emily McDonnell, and Morgan Raque. Distributed by Film Movement.<br /><br />While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry and Francis Mellon are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis&rsquo;s practical jokes have become more and more aggressive, culminating in his accidentally injuring Henry in a drunken fight. After humiliating himself with a daughter of the town&rsquo;s preeminent family, Henry disappears into the night. Only months later does Francis learn that Henry has joined the Union army, leaving the two brothers to experience the war separately and in radically different circumstances.<br /><br />In the context of a contemporary American independent cinema that&rsquo;s too often focused on the travails of 21<sup>st</sup> century urban hipsters, MEN GO TO BATTLE is impressively ambitious in its period recreation (including some admirably resourceful Civil War battle sequences). Its two socially awkward, aimless protagonists are in a sense the ancestors of the archetype that populates much of today&rsquo;s independent cinema, but set against the backdrop of a cataclysmic conflict, their aimlessness takes on an unusual poignancy: Henry and Francis are two lost souls buffeted by the upheaval of a world they only dimly understand. A deeply melancholy but graceful film, MEN GO TO BATTLE is almost novelistic in its depiction of the branching fates of two brothers in wartime.<br /><br />&ldquo;Treitz persuasively and passionately re-creates a grand panorama on an intimate scale. [&hellip;] [He] captures rugged country life at a muscular level. The actors&rsquo; terse wit, chewy accents, and impulsive gestures suggest great physical force as well as equally great cultural constraints, ambient violence and a fear of God. The production designer, Jacob Heustis, is the film&rsquo;s virtual co-author; the clothing and the furnishings have the aura of simple authenticity, which is reinforced by the cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz&rsquo;s agile impressionism, illuminated by streaky sunlight, flickering bonfires, and dim lanterns.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Brody, NEW YORKER<br /><br />&ldquo;At once a witty comedy about arrested development and a deeper rumination on individual experiences during wartime, MEN GO TO BATTLE is an effective period piece with a contemporary soul.&rdquo; &ndash;Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE</p> Wednesday, July 13