Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Tue, 25 Apr 2017 14:25:54 -0400 NYWIFT: LOST IN FLORENCE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47260 <p>Evan Oppenheimer (Writer and Director) and Wendy Blackstone (Producer, NYWIFT Member)<br /><br />Eric Lombard is at a crossroads &ndash; does he continue to pursue his long-shot dream of playing professional football, or does he start the next phase of his life, and apply to law school? As he struggles with this decision, Eric &ndash; along with his longtime girlfriend, Colleen &ndash; visits his cousin in Florence. There, to his surprise, he gets involved with the ancient local sport of Calcio Storico, and everything that Eric has assumed about his life is challenged.</p> Tuesday, April 25 RACKSTRAW DOWNES: A PAINTER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47254 <p>RACKSTRAW DOWNES &amp; RIMA YAMAZAKI IN PERSON!<br /><br />Since the early 1970s Rackstraw Downes has committed himself to painting from observation, on site, from start to finish. He has painted both urban and rural landscapes as well as interior spaces, in New York, Texas, and Maine. Although he simply paints exactly what he sees, the ordinary locations become transformed into extraordinary scenes. In 2014 Downes spent the summer painting in the northern part of Manhattan, as well as his own studio in SoHo. Directed by Rima Yamazaki, who has made numerous film portraits of artists over the past decade or so, this film documents Downes working on site, outdoors and indoors, in an observational style. Some of his past works, which he painted in New York City, are also included in the film, along with footage Yamazaki shot while visiting those sites on her own. In addition to his paintings, Downes is known as a skilled writer, and here he recites a couple of texts specifically for this film. RACKSTRAW DOWNES: A PAINTER is a unique but truthful portrait of the artist, filtered through Yamazaki&rsquo;s point of view and inspired by the painter&rsquo;s art.<br /><br />Rima Yamazaki is an independent documentary filmmaker who specializes in contemporary art and architecture. Her practice is an exploration of cinematic expression in documenting, studying, and reflecting on the arts. She works as a one-person film crew; all her films are directed, photographed, and edited by herself. Her films have been shown at various film festivals and venues internationally.<br /><br /><strong><em>Rackstraw Downes and Rima Yamazaki will both be here in person, for a special conversation following the screening!</em></strong></p> Wednesday, April 26 EC: STAN BRAKHAGE PGM 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47143 <p>Unless otherwise noted, all films are silent.<br />DESISTFILM (1954, 7 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, sound)<br />REFLECTIONS ON BLACK (1955, 12 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, sound. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />THE WONDER RING (1955, 4 min, 16mm)<br />FLESH OF MORNING (1956, 25 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />DAYBREAK AND WHITEYE (1957, 8 min, 16mm)<br />WINDOW WATER BABY MOVING (1959, 12 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />Films made during the early, &ldquo;psychodramatic&rdquo; period of one of modern cinema&rsquo;s greatest innovators, including two of his early experiments with sound. <br /><br />Total running time: ca. 75 minutes.</p> Thursday, April 27 FLOTEL EUROPA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47197 <p>In 1992 a wave of refugees from the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina reached Denmark. With existing refugee camps completely full, the Red Cross pulled a giant ship into the canals of Copenhagen. The ship, Flotel Europa, became a temporary home for a thousand people waiting for decisions on their asylum applications. Among them was a 12-year-old boy, Vladimir, who fled Sarajevo together with his mother and older brother. They spent two years in the limbo of Flotel Europa. More than two decades later, Vladimir Tomic constructed this filmic portrait of the experience of growing up on this ship filled with echoes of the war &ndash; and other things that make up an adolescence. The coming-of-age story is juxtaposed with personal VHS archive material shot by the refugees who shared the &ldquo;space-time vacuum&rdquo; of the Flotel.</p> Saturday, April 29 SITE 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47200 <p>&ldquo;For Rithy Panh&rsquo;s debut film, he returned to the borderland between Cambodia and Thailand ten years after he himself had been a refugee in the region. Site 2 (or Site II) is the name of what for many years was the largest camp for people that fled Cambodia and refugees from Vietnam that had come via land. Founded in 1985 on Thai territory and closed in 1993, its population had reached 180,000 at the time when Panh shot his film. On the one hand it had a developed infrastructure with hospitals, schools, temples, and a market; on the other hand, like many other refugee camps in this region, its population suffered from internal and external violence and diseases. 5.6 square kilometers large, fenced in with barbed wire, and patrolled by Thai forces, it offered a very restricted life for its inhabitants, who were assigned minimal personal space. Rather than dramatizing these negative aspects, Panh&rsquo;s remarkable film calmly follows the daily routine in the camp.&rdquo; &ndash;Maren Hobein, GOETHE-INSTITUT LONDON</p> Saturday, April 29 EC: SONGS 1-14 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47144 <p>&ldquo;SONG 1: Portrait of a lady. SONGS 2 &amp; 3: Fire and a mind&rsquo;s movement in remembering. SONG 4: Three girls playing with a ball. Hand painted. SONG 5: A childbirth song. SONG 6: The painted veil via moth-death. SONG 7: San Francisco. SONG 8: Sea creatures. SONG 9: Wedding source and substance. SONG 10: Sitting around. SONG 11: Fires, windows, an insect, a lyre of rain scratches. SONG 12: Verticals and shadows caught in glass traps. SONG 13: A travel song of scenes and horizontals. SONG 14: Molds, paints and crystals.&rdquo; &ndash;S.B.</p> Saturday, April 29 HAVARIE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47203 <p>&ldquo;With HAVARIE, Scheffner made the radical decision &ndash; in light of the current refugee crisis &ndash; to replace the 90-minute visual track of the film with a 3.5-minute cell phone YouTube video of Algerian refugees adrift in a tiny boat in the Mediterranean &ndash; an image stretched in slow motion over the entire duration of the film&rsquo;s soundscape. [&hellip;] The boat anchors the spectator&rsquo;s gaze as diverse languages and viewpoints on the soundtrack and in the subtitles discuss the waters, the plight of refugees, other maritime forms of migration and transnationalism on cruise and container ships, the desire for Europe, memories of crossing, of home, loss, and longing. [&hellip;] [Ultimately the] film&rsquo;s imagery gives way to a confrontation between supplication and agency in which spectators must acknowledge their cinematic privilege, a stand-in for their privilege beyond the movie theatre. But the confrontation of positions is also an opportunity for exchange, for thought, for communication.&rdquo; &ndash;Brigitta Wagner, SENSES OF CINEMA</p> Saturday, April 29 SITE 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47201 <p>&ldquo;For Rithy Panh&rsquo;s debut film, he returned to the borderland between Cambodia and Thailand ten years after he himself had been a refugee in the region. Site 2 (or Site II) is the name of what for many years was the largest camp for people that fled Cambodia and refugees from Vietnam that had come via land. Founded in 1985 on Thai territory and closed in 1993, its population had reached 180,000 at the time when Panh shot his film. On the one hand it had a developed infrastructure with hospitals, schools, temples, and a market; on the other hand, like many other refugee camps in this region, its population suffered from internal and external violence and diseases. 5.6 square kilometers large, fenced in with barbed wire, and patrolled by Thai forces, it offered a very restricted life for its inhabitants, who were assigned minimal personal space. Rather than dramatizing these negative aspects, Panh&rsquo;s remarkable film calmly follows the daily routine in the camp.&rdquo; &ndash;Maren Hobein, GOETHE-INSTITUT LONDON</p> Sunday, April 30 EC: SONGS 15-22 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47145 <p>&ldquo;SONG 15: FIFTEEN SONG TRAITS: A series of individual portraits of friends and family &ndash; Robert Creeley, Michael McClure, Ed Dorn, Jonas Mekas, others. SONG 16: A flowering of sex as in the mind&rsquo;s eye, a joy. SONGS 17 &amp; 18: The movie house cathedral and a singular room. SONGS 19 &amp; 20: Women dancing and a light. SONGS 21 &amp; 22: Two views of closed-eye vision.&rdquo; &ndash;Stan Brakhage</p> Sunday, April 30 THOSE WHO JUMP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47265 <p>(LES SAUTEURS)<br /><br />In northern Morocco lies the Spanish exclave of Melilla: Europe on African Land. On the mountain above, over a thousand hopeful African migrants are encamped, watching the fence separating Morocco and Spain. Abou from Mali is one of them &ndash; the protagonist in front of the camera, as well as the person behind it. For over a year, he has ceaselessly attempted to jump the fence. At the fence, they have to overcome barbed wire, automatic pepper spray, and brutal authorities. After every failed attempt, they return to Mount Gurug&uacute;, scouring for food in the nearby villages, trying to uphold some sort of order in the camp, and building up their confidence again. Some give up and return home, others never return. Through the lens, Abou gradually finds expression and meaning in his situation. &ldquo;When filming I feel that I exist.&rdquo; But after 16 months on the mountain, returning to Mali is not an option for him and he becomes more determined than ever to pursue his dream of a better life in Europe.</p> Sunday, April 30 EC: STAN BRAKHAGE PGM 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47148 <p>SONGS 24-26 (1967/85, 15 min, 16mm)<br />MY MOUNTAIN: SONG 27 (1968, 25 min, 16mm)<br />MY MOUNTAIN: SONG 27: PART 2: RIVERS (1969, 33 min, 16mm)<br />SONGS 28-29 (1966/86, 21 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;SONGS 24 &amp;25: A naked boy and flute song; a being about nature. SONG 26: a &lsquo;conversation piece&rsquo; &ndash; a vis-&agrave;-visual, inspired by the (e)motional properties of talk: drone, bird-like twitterings, statement terror &amp; bombast. SONG 28: Scenes as texture. SONG 29: A portrait of the artist&rsquo;s mother.&rdquo; &ndash;Stan Brakhage<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 100 min.</p> Sunday, April 30 A WORLD NOT OURS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2017#showing-47205 <p>(ALAM LAYSA LANA)<br /><br />Before his family settled in Denmark, filmmaker Mahdi Fleifel grew up in the Palestinian refugee camp of Ain el-Helweh, in Lebanon. Hastily built in 1948 and, at the time of filming, housing 70,000 refugees in one square kilometer, Ain el-Helweh is an unlikely source of nostalgia and yearning, but for Fleifel it represents the closest thing to a home, a precious concept given his family&rsquo;s history and eventual settlement in Europe. Through the years Fleifel returned regularly to visit friends and family, always with camera in tow, and in A WORLD NOT OURS he shapes his extensive video diaries into an affectionate, witty, yet ultimately shattering portrait of this community. Gradually focusing on the experiences of Fleifel&rsquo;s friend Abu Eyad, whose natural intelligence makes him an especially articulate and sensitive witness to the tragically circumscribed lives of Ain el-Helweh&rsquo;s residents, A WORLD NOT OURS conveys the Palestinian experience with an insight that very few films have equaled.<br /><br />With:<br />XENOS (2014, 13 min, digital)<br />Fleifel&rsquo;s follow-up to A WORLD NOT OURS continues the story of Abu Eyad. In 2010, Eyad and others travelled with smugglers through Syria and Turkey into Greece in search of a better future, only to find themselves trapped in a country undergoing economic, political, and social collapse.<br /><br />A MAN RETURNED (2016, 30 min, digital)<br />Fleifel&rsquo;s most recent film focuses on yet another camp resident first seen in A WORLD NOT OURS, Reda. Like Eyad, Reda made his way to Greece, but was ultimately deported, returning to Lebanon with only a heroin addiction to show for his troubles. Finding a camp torn apart by internal strife, he decides, against all odds, to marry his childhood sweetheart.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 140 min.</p> Sunday, April 30 LAMPEDUSA IN WINTER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47208 <p>This documentary reveals the numerous crises besetting the residents &ndash; both temporary and permanent &ndash; of Lampedusa, the Italian island that is the first port of call for African migrants striving to reach Europe. While the migrants protest the poor treatment they receive, the local fishing community is also restless. There&rsquo;s division among the inhabitants of the island, and the garbage is piling up &ndash; as are the leaky, abandoned immigrant boats in the harbor. In the meantime, a lawyer from Palermo is trying to arrange a place of burial for those who have died, and the mayor is trying to keep everyone calm. LAMPEDUSA IN WINTER is an elegant documentary portrait of a tiny community at the edge of Europe that&rsquo;s engaged in a desperate fight for dignity, and for solidarity with those who many consider the cause of the ongoing crisis: the African boat people.</p> Monday, May 01 TIP OF MY TONGUE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47367 <p>LYNNE SACHS IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Dominga Alvarado, Mark Cohen, Sholeh Dalai, Andrea Kannapell, Sarah Markgraf, Shira Nayman, George Sanchez, Adam Schartoff, Erik Schurink, Accra Shepp, Sue Simon, and Jim Supanick.<br /><br />To celebrate her 50th birthday, filmmaker Lynne Sachs gathers together other people, men and women who have lived through precisely the same years but come from places like Iran or Cuba or Australia or the Lower East Side, not Memphis, Tennessee where Sachs grew up. She invites 12 fellow New Yorkers &ndash; born across several continents in the 1960s &ndash; to spend a weekend with her making a movie. Together they discuss some of the most salient, strange, and revealing moments of their lives in a brash, self-reflexive examination of the way in which uncontrollable events outside our own domestic universe impact who we are. As director and participant, Sachs, who wrote her own series of 50 poems for every year of her life, guides her collaborators across the landscape of their memories. Together, they move from the Vietnam War protests to the Anita Hill hearings to the Columbine Shootings to Occupy Wall Street. Using the backdrop of the horizon as it meets the water in each of NYC&rsquo;s five boroughs as well as abstracted archival material, TIP OF MY TONGUE becomes an activator in the resurrection of complex, sometimes paradoxical reflections. Traditional timelines are replaced by a multi-layered, cinematic architecture that both speaks to and visualizes the nature of historical expression.<br /><br />&ldquo;In TIP OF MY TONGUE, the past is unearthed, turned over and reconsidered in new and astonishing ways. Interspersed with poetry and flashes of archival footage, this poignant reverie reveals how far beyond our control life is, and how far we can go despite this.&rdquo; &ndash;Kathy Brew, MUSEUM OF MODERN ART<br /><br />&ldquo;Reveals the complex and diverse ways that public events enter our consciousness.&rdquo; &ndash;David Finkelstein, FILM INTERNATIONAL<br /><br /><strong><em>Lynne Sachs will be here in person for both shows!</em></strong>&nbsp;</p> Monday, May 01 FIRE AT SEA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47210 <p>(FUOCOAMMARE)<br /><br />Like LAMPEDUSA IN WINTER, FIRE AT SEA takes place on the remote Mediterranean island of Lampedusa, which has become a major entry point for refugees into Europe. There, we meet Samuele, a 12-year-old boy who lives simply, climbing rocks by the shore and playing with his slingshot. Nearby, we bear witness as thousands of men, women, and children risk their lives to make the brutal crossing from Africa. Filmmaker Gianfranco Rosi masterfully juxtaposes these realities, jolting the audience into a new understanding of what is happening in the region, the heavy toll of the migrant crisis, and the price of freedom.</p> Monday, May 01 FLOTEL EUROPA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47198 <p>In 1992 a wave of refugees from the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina reached Denmark. With existing refugee camps completely full, the Red Cross pulled a giant ship into the canals of Copenhagen. The ship, Flotel Europa, became a temporary home for a thousand people waiting for decisions on their asylum applications. Among them was a 12-year-old boy, Vladimir, who fled Sarajevo together with his mother and older brother. They spent two years in the limbo of Flotel Europa. More than two decades later, Vladimir Tomic constructed this filmic portrait of the experience of growing up on this ship filled with echoes of the war &ndash; and other things that make up an adolescence. The coming-of-age story is juxtaposed with personal VHS archive material shot by the refugees who shared the &ldquo;space-time vacuum&rdquo; of the Flotel.</p> Tuesday, May 02 TIP OF MY TONGUE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47368 <p>LYNNE SACHS IN PERSON!<br /><br />With Dominga Alvarado, Mark Cohen, Sholeh Dalai, Andrea Kannapell, Sarah Markgraf, Shira Nayman, George Sanchez, Adam Schartoff, Erik Schurink, Accra Shepp, Sue Simon, and Jim Supanick.<br /><br />To celebrate her 50th birthday, filmmaker Lynne Sachs gathers together other people, men and women who have lived through precisely the same years but come from places like Iran or Cuba or Australia or the Lower East Side, not Memphis, Tennessee where Sachs grew up. She invites 12 fellow New Yorkers &ndash; born across several continents in the 1960s &ndash; to spend a weekend with her making a movie. Together they discuss some of the most salient, strange, and revealing moments of their lives in a brash, self-reflexive examination of the way in which uncontrollable events outside our own domestic universe impact who we are. As director and participant, Sachs, who wrote her own series of 50 poems for every year of her life, guides her collaborators across the landscape of their memories. Together, they move from the Vietnam War protests to the Anita Hill hearings to the Columbine Shootings to Occupy Wall Street. Using the backdrop of the horizon as it meets the water in each of NYC&rsquo;s five boroughs as well as abstracted archival material, TIP OF MY TONGUE becomes an activator in the resurrection of complex, sometimes paradoxical reflections. Traditional timelines are replaced by a multi-layered, cinematic architecture that both speaks to and visualizes the nature of historical expression.<br /><br />&ldquo;In TIP OF MY TONGUE, the past is unearthed, turned over and reconsidered in new and astonishing ways. Interspersed with poetry and flashes of archival footage, this poignant reverie reveals how far beyond our control life is, and how far we can go despite this.&rdquo; &ndash;Kathy Brew, MUSEUM OF MODERN ART<br /><br />&ldquo;Reveals the complex and diverse ways that public events enter our consciousness.&rdquo; &ndash;David Finkelstein, FILM INTERNATIONAL<br /><br /><strong><em>Lynne Sachs will be here in person for both shows!</em></strong>&nbsp;</p> Tuesday, May 02 THOSE WHO JUMP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47266 <p>(LES SAUTEURS)<br /><br />In northern Morocco lies the Spanish exclave of Melilla: Europe on African Land. On the mountain above, over a thousand hopeful African migrants are encamped, watching the fence separating Morocco and Spain. Abou from Mali is one of them &ndash; the protagonist in front of the camera, as well as the person behind it. For over a year, he has ceaselessly attempted to jump the fence. At the fence, they have to overcome barbed wire, automatic pepper spray, and brutal authorities. After every failed attempt, they return to Mount Gurug&uacute;, scouring for food in the nearby villages, trying to uphold some sort of order in the camp, and building up their confidence again. Some give up and return home, others never return. Through the lens, Abou gradually finds expression and meaning in his situation. &ldquo;When filming I feel that I exist.&rdquo; But after 16 months on the mountain, returning to Mali is not an option for him and he becomes more determined than ever to pursue his dream of a better life in Europe.</p> Tuesday, May 02 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47450 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, May 03 MAY THEY REST IN REVOLT (FIGURES OF WAR) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47212 <p>(QU&rsquo;ILS REPOSENT EN R&Eacute;VOLTE (DES FIGURES DE GUERRES))<br /><br />&ldquo;This FIPRESCI prize winner at the 2011 Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Cinema (BAFICI) leaves policy debates about European immigration aside in favor of a piercing, immersive encounter with the migrant experience itself. French documentarian Sylvain George spent three years recording in black and white the daily grind of the inhabitants, all men, from the Middle East and North Africa, of a makeshift refugee camp in the French port of Calais. By turns poetic and blunt, George&rsquo;s montage connects us intimately to bodies and voices battered by waves of hunger, fear, anger, hope, boredom, and isolation &ndash; culminating in the camp&rsquo;s destruction by police.&rdquo; &ndash;UCLA FILM &amp; TELEVISION ARCHIVE</p> Wednesday, May 03 13TH ANNUAL NEW YORK POLISH FILM FESTIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47398 <p>The annual New York Polish Film Festival presents its 13th annual showcase of Poland&rsquo;s most riveting cinematic feats. From its beginning, the festival has offered an opportunity to discover various trends and developments in Polish cinema.<br /><br />This year&rsquo;s festival will honor the memory of world cinema legend, Andrzej Wajda &ndash; who passed away in October &ndash; with an opening night gala celebration screening of his final film, AFTERIMAGE (POWIDOKI), as well as a screening of his classic ASHES AND DIAMONDS (1958). And in cooperation with the Wajda Film School in Warsaw, which was created by Andrzej Wajda and is celebrating its 15th anniversary, NYPFF will present a retrospective of its students&rsquo; short, documentary, and &ldquo;first feature&rdquo; projects.<br /><br />The NYPFF will continue with screenings of some of the best new films from Poland, including THE LAST FAMILY by Jan P. Matuszyński, WOŁYŃ by Wojtek Smarzowski, UNITED STATES OF LOVE by Tomasz Wasilewski, and the Polish blockbuster comedy SINGLES PLANET by Mitja Okorn, among many others.<br /><br />The Festival is presented with the support of The Polish Consulate General in New York, the Polish Embassy in Washington, DC, the Polish Cultural Institute in New York, the Governor of New York, and the Association of Polish Filmmakers, as well as our Sponsors.<br /><br /><em><strong>For the full screening schedule, please visit: www.nypff.com.</strong></em><br /><br /><br /></p> Thursday, May 04 A WORLD NOT OURS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47206 <p>(ALAM LAYSA LANA)<br /><br />Before his family settled in Denmark, filmmaker Mahdi Fleifel grew up in the Palestinian refugee camp of Ain el-Helweh, in Lebanon. Hastily built in 1948 and, at the time of filming, housing 70,000 refugees in one square kilometer, Ain el-Helweh is an unlikely source of nostalgia and yearning, but for Fleifel it represents the closest thing to a home, a precious concept given his family&rsquo;s history and eventual settlement in Europe. Through the years Fleifel returned regularly to visit friends and family, always with camera in tow, and in A WORLD NOT OURS he shapes his extensive video diaries into an affectionate, witty, yet ultimately shattering portrait of this community. Gradually focusing on the experiences of Fleifel&rsquo;s friend Abu Eyad, whose natural intelligence makes him an especially articulate and sensitive witness to the tragically circumscribed lives of Ain el-Helweh&rsquo;s residents, A WORLD NOT OURS conveys the Palestinian experience with an insight that very few films have equaled.<br /><br />With:<br />XENOS (2014, 13 min, digital)<br />Fleifel&rsquo;s follow-up to A WORLD NOT OURS continues the story of Abu Eyad. In 2010, Eyad and others travelled with smugglers through Syria and Turkey into Greece in search of a better future, only to find themselves trapped in a country undergoing economic, political, and social collapse.<br /><br />A MAN RETURNED (2016, 30 min, digital)<br />Fleifel&rsquo;s most recent film focuses on yet another camp resident first seen in A WORLD NOT OURS, Reda. Like Eyad, Reda made his way to Greece, but was ultimately deported, returning to Lebanon with only a heroin addiction to show for his troubles. Finding a camp torn apart by internal strife, he decides, against all odds, to marry his childhood sweetheart.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 140 min.</p> Thursday, May 04 13TH ANNUAL NEW YORK POLISH FILM FESTIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47399 <p>The annual New York Polish Film Festival presents its 13th annual showcase of Poland&rsquo;s most riveting cinematic feats. From its beginning, the festival has offered an opportunity to discover various trends and developments in Polish cinema.<br /><br />This year&rsquo;s festival will honor the memory of world cinema legend, Andrzej Wajda &ndash; who passed away in October &ndash; with an opening night gala celebration screening of his final film, AFTERIMAGE (POWIDOKI), as well as a screening of his classic ASHES AND DIAMONDS (1958). And in cooperation with the Wajda Film School in Warsaw, which was created by Andrzej Wajda and is celebrating its 15th anniversary, NYPFF will present a retrospective of its students&rsquo; short, documentary, and &ldquo;first feature&rdquo; projects.<br /><br />The NYPFF will continue with screenings of some of the best new films from Poland, including THE LAST FAMILY by Jan P. Matuszyński, WOŁYŃ by Wojtek Smarzowski, UNITED STATES OF LOVE by Tomasz Wasilewski, and the Polish blockbuster comedy SINGLES PLANET by Mitja Okorn, among many others.<br /><br />The Festival is presented with the support of The Polish Consulate General in New York, the Polish Embassy in Washington, DC, the Polish Cultural Institute in New York, the Governor of New York, and the Association of Polish Filmmakers, as well as our Sponsors.<br /><br /><em><strong>For the full screening schedule, please visit: www.nypff.com.</strong></em><br /><br /><br /></p> Friday, May 05 TA’ANG http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47282 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Continuing Anthology&rsquo;s longstanding commitment to presenting the work of Wang Bing, and as a culmination of our series, &ldquo;Displaced Persons: Migration on Film,&rdquo; we host the theatrical premiere run of Wang&rsquo;s new film, TA&rsquo;ANG, perhaps the most revealing cinematic portrait yet of life in a refugee camp. Taking as his subject the Burmese Ta&rsquo;ang ethnic minority refugees who have crossed to China&rsquo;s Yunnan province to escape a violent insurgency raging near their homes in Myanmar, Wang documents their experiences with the profound patience, palpable attention to detail, and peerless intimacy that distinguished his past masterpieces WEST OF THE TRACKS, FENGMING, and &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART. Wang is possessed of an extraordinary ability to locate in the flux and chaos of his subject matter a clarifying shape and imagery of sometimes devastating power, without ever allowing structural concerns or visual style to take precedence over the lives of the men and women before his camera. TA&rsquo;ANG is as urgent and timely a film as he&rsquo;s made to date.<br /><br />&ldquo;As in his recent asylum expos&eacute;, &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART, Wang puts a premium on scenes of commiseration amid the unendurable, and sandwiched between the movie&rsquo;s rugged, crudely framed scenes of flight and dogged endurance is a remarkable centerpiece, a collection of conversations by fire- and candlelight between refugees too exhausted to move, too rattled to sleep, caught in Georges de La Tour lighting.&rdquo; &ndash;Nick Pinkerton, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Wang Bing films souls&rsquo; could be a rough approximation of the impossible magic he regularly weaves in these &lsquo;realist&rsquo; documentaries. He accomplishes this thanks to a combination of extraordinary sensitivity to his subjects&rsquo; body language and an uncanny ability to choose just the right distance. Not too close, so as not to intrude on and disrupt the aura around their autonomous dignity and existence; not too far, so as to preserve an extraordinary intimacy that allows us to feel as if we&rsquo;re seeing right through their skins, as if they were made transparent via their bodies and words, revealing the complex emotions, histories, and social relationships that make up the essence of one&rsquo;s personality.&rdquo; &ndash;Shelly Kraicer, CINEMA SCOPE</p> Friday, May 05 TA’ANG http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47283 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Continuing Anthology&rsquo;s longstanding commitment to presenting the work of Wang Bing, and as a culmination of our series, &ldquo;Displaced Persons: Migration on Film,&rdquo; we host the theatrical premiere run of Wang&rsquo;s new film, TA&rsquo;ANG, perhaps the most revealing cinematic portrait yet of life in a refugee camp. Taking as his subject the Burmese Ta&rsquo;ang ethnic minority refugees who have crossed to China&rsquo;s Yunnan province to escape a violent insurgency raging near their homes in Myanmar, Wang documents their experiences with the profound patience, palpable attention to detail, and peerless intimacy that distinguished his past masterpieces WEST OF THE TRACKS, FENGMING, and &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART. Wang is possessed of an extraordinary ability to locate in the flux and chaos of his subject matter a clarifying shape and imagery of sometimes devastating power, without ever allowing structural concerns or visual style to take precedence over the lives of the men and women before his camera. TA&rsquo;ANG is as urgent and timely a film as he&rsquo;s made to date.<br /><br />&ldquo;As in his recent asylum expos&eacute;, &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART, Wang puts a premium on scenes of commiseration amid the unendurable, and sandwiched between the movie&rsquo;s rugged, crudely framed scenes of flight and dogged endurance is a remarkable centerpiece, a collection of conversations by fire- and candlelight between refugees too exhausted to move, too rattled to sleep, caught in Georges de La Tour lighting.&rdquo; &ndash;Nick Pinkerton, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Wang Bing films souls&rsquo; could be a rough approximation of the impossible magic he regularly weaves in these &lsquo;realist&rsquo; documentaries. He accomplishes this thanks to a combination of extraordinary sensitivity to his subjects&rsquo; body language and an uncanny ability to choose just the right distance. Not too close, so as not to intrude on and disrupt the aura around their autonomous dignity and existence; not too far, so as to preserve an extraordinary intimacy that allows us to feel as if we&rsquo;re seeing right through their skins, as if they were made transparent via their bodies and words, revealing the complex emotions, histories, and social relationships that make up the essence of one&rsquo;s personality.&rdquo; &ndash;Shelly Kraicer, CINEMA SCOPE</p> Saturday, May 06 13TH ANNUAL NEW YORK POLISH FILM FESTIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47400 <p>The annual New York Polish Film Festival presents its 13th annual showcase of Poland&rsquo;s most riveting cinematic feats. From its beginning, the festival has offered an opportunity to discover various trends and developments in Polish cinema.<br /><br />This year&rsquo;s festival will honor the memory of world cinema legend, Andrzej Wajda &ndash; who passed away in October &ndash; with an opening night gala celebration screening of his final film, AFTERIMAGE (POWIDOKI), as well as a screening of his classic ASHES AND DIAMONDS (1958). And in cooperation with the Wajda Film School in Warsaw, which was created by Andrzej Wajda and is celebrating its 15th anniversary, NYPFF will present a retrospective of its students&rsquo; short, documentary, and &ldquo;first feature&rdquo; projects.<br /><br />The NYPFF will continue with screenings of some of the best new films from Poland, including THE LAST FAMILY by Jan P. Matuszyński, WOŁYŃ by Wojtek Smarzowski, UNITED STATES OF LOVE by Tomasz Wasilewski, and the Polish blockbuster comedy SINGLES PLANET by Mitja Okorn, among many others.<br /><br />The Festival is presented with the support of The Polish Consulate General in New York, the Polish Embassy in Washington, DC, the Polish Cultural Institute in New York, the Governor of New York, and the Association of Polish Filmmakers, as well as our Sponsors.<br /><br /><em><strong>For the full screening schedule, please visit: www.nypff.com.</strong></em><br /><br /><br /></p> Saturday, May 06 TA’ANG http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47284 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Continuing Anthology&rsquo;s longstanding commitment to presenting the work of Wang Bing, and as a culmination of our series, &ldquo;Displaced Persons: Migration on Film,&rdquo; we host the theatrical premiere run of Wang&rsquo;s new film, TA&rsquo;ANG, perhaps the most revealing cinematic portrait yet of life in a refugee camp. Taking as his subject the Burmese Ta&rsquo;ang ethnic minority refugees who have crossed to China&rsquo;s Yunnan province to escape a violent insurgency raging near their homes in Myanmar, Wang documents their experiences with the profound patience, palpable attention to detail, and peerless intimacy that distinguished his past masterpieces WEST OF THE TRACKS, FENGMING, and &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART. Wang is possessed of an extraordinary ability to locate in the flux and chaos of his subject matter a clarifying shape and imagery of sometimes devastating power, without ever allowing structural concerns or visual style to take precedence over the lives of the men and women before his camera. TA&rsquo;ANG is as urgent and timely a film as he&rsquo;s made to date.<br /><br />&ldquo;As in his recent asylum expos&eacute;, &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART, Wang puts a premium on scenes of commiseration amid the unendurable, and sandwiched between the movie&rsquo;s rugged, crudely framed scenes of flight and dogged endurance is a remarkable centerpiece, a collection of conversations by fire- and candlelight between refugees too exhausted to move, too rattled to sleep, caught in Georges de La Tour lighting.&rdquo; &ndash;Nick Pinkerton, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Wang Bing films souls&rsquo; could be a rough approximation of the impossible magic he regularly weaves in these &lsquo;realist&rsquo; documentaries. He accomplishes this thanks to a combination of extraordinary sensitivity to his subjects&rsquo; body language and an uncanny ability to choose just the right distance. Not too close, so as not to intrude on and disrupt the aura around their autonomous dignity and existence; not too far, so as to preserve an extraordinary intimacy that allows us to feel as if we&rsquo;re seeing right through their skins, as if they were made transparent via their bodies and words, revealing the complex emotions, histories, and social relationships that make up the essence of one&rsquo;s personality.&rdquo; &ndash;Shelly Kraicer, CINEMA SCOPE</p> Saturday, May 06 TA’ANG http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47285 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Continuing Anthology&rsquo;s longstanding commitment to presenting the work of Wang Bing, and as a culmination of our series, &ldquo;Displaced Persons: Migration on Film,&rdquo; we host the theatrical premiere run of Wang&rsquo;s new film, TA&rsquo;ANG, perhaps the most revealing cinematic portrait yet of life in a refugee camp. Taking as his subject the Burmese Ta&rsquo;ang ethnic minority refugees who have crossed to China&rsquo;s Yunnan province to escape a violent insurgency raging near their homes in Myanmar, Wang documents their experiences with the profound patience, palpable attention to detail, and peerless intimacy that distinguished his past masterpieces WEST OF THE TRACKS, FENGMING, and &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART. Wang is possessed of an extraordinary ability to locate in the flux and chaos of his subject matter a clarifying shape and imagery of sometimes devastating power, without ever allowing structural concerns or visual style to take precedence over the lives of the men and women before his camera. TA&rsquo;ANG is as urgent and timely a film as he&rsquo;s made to date.<br /><br />&ldquo;As in his recent asylum expos&eacute;, &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART, Wang puts a premium on scenes of commiseration amid the unendurable, and sandwiched between the movie&rsquo;s rugged, crudely framed scenes of flight and dogged endurance is a remarkable centerpiece, a collection of conversations by fire- and candlelight between refugees too exhausted to move, too rattled to sleep, caught in Georges de La Tour lighting.&rdquo; &ndash;Nick Pinkerton, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Wang Bing films souls&rsquo; could be a rough approximation of the impossible magic he regularly weaves in these &lsquo;realist&rsquo; documentaries. He accomplishes this thanks to a combination of extraordinary sensitivity to his subjects&rsquo; body language and an uncanny ability to choose just the right distance. Not too close, so as not to intrude on and disrupt the aura around their autonomous dignity and existence; not too far, so as to preserve an extraordinary intimacy that allows us to feel as if we&rsquo;re seeing right through their skins, as if they were made transparent via their bodies and words, revealing the complex emotions, histories, and social relationships that make up the essence of one&rsquo;s personality.&rdquo; &ndash;Shelly Kraicer, CINEMA SCOPE</p> Sunday, May 07 13TH ANNUAL NEW YORK POLISH FILM FESTIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47401 <p>The annual New York Polish Film Festival presents its 13th annual showcase of Poland&rsquo;s most riveting cinematic feats. From its beginning, the festival has offered an opportunity to discover various trends and developments in Polish cinema.<br /><br />This year&rsquo;s festival will honor the memory of world cinema legend, Andrzej Wajda &ndash; who passed away in October &ndash; with an opening night gala celebration screening of his final film, AFTERIMAGE (POWIDOKI), as well as a screening of his classic ASHES AND DIAMONDS (1958). And in cooperation with the Wajda Film School in Warsaw, which was created by Andrzej Wajda and is celebrating its 15th anniversary, NYPFF will present a retrospective of its students&rsquo; short, documentary, and &ldquo;first feature&rdquo; projects.<br /><br />The NYPFF will continue with screenings of some of the best new films from Poland, including THE LAST FAMILY by Jan P. Matuszyński, WOŁYŃ by Wojtek Smarzowski, UNITED STATES OF LOVE by Tomasz Wasilewski, and the Polish blockbuster comedy SINGLES PLANET by Mitja Okorn, among many others.<br /><br />The Festival is presented with the support of The Polish Consulate General in New York, the Polish Embassy in Washington, DC, the Polish Cultural Institute in New York, the Governor of New York, and the Association of Polish Filmmakers, as well as our Sponsors.<br /><br /><em><strong>For the full screening schedule, please visit: www.nypff.com.</strong></em><br /><br /><br /></p> Sunday, May 07 TA’ANG http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47286 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Continuing Anthology&rsquo;s longstanding commitment to presenting the work of Wang Bing, and as a culmination of our series, &ldquo;Displaced Persons: Migration on Film,&rdquo; we host the theatrical premiere run of Wang&rsquo;s new film, TA&rsquo;ANG, perhaps the most revealing cinematic portrait yet of life in a refugee camp. Taking as his subject the Burmese Ta&rsquo;ang ethnic minority refugees who have crossed to China&rsquo;s Yunnan province to escape a violent insurgency raging near their homes in Myanmar, Wang documents their experiences with the profound patience, palpable attention to detail, and peerless intimacy that distinguished his past masterpieces WEST OF THE TRACKS, FENGMING, and &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART. Wang is possessed of an extraordinary ability to locate in the flux and chaos of his subject matter a clarifying shape and imagery of sometimes devastating power, without ever allowing structural concerns or visual style to take precedence over the lives of the men and women before his camera. TA&rsquo;ANG is as urgent and timely a film as he&rsquo;s made to date.<br /><br />&ldquo;As in his recent asylum expos&eacute;, &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART, Wang puts a premium on scenes of commiseration amid the unendurable, and sandwiched between the movie&rsquo;s rugged, crudely framed scenes of flight and dogged endurance is a remarkable centerpiece, a collection of conversations by fire- and candlelight between refugees too exhausted to move, too rattled to sleep, caught in Georges de La Tour lighting.&rdquo; &ndash;Nick Pinkerton, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Wang Bing films souls&rsquo; could be a rough approximation of the impossible magic he regularly weaves in these &lsquo;realist&rsquo; documentaries. He accomplishes this thanks to a combination of extraordinary sensitivity to his subjects&rsquo; body language and an uncanny ability to choose just the right distance. Not too close, so as not to intrude on and disrupt the aura around their autonomous dignity and existence; not too far, so as to preserve an extraordinary intimacy that allows us to feel as if we&rsquo;re seeing right through their skins, as if they were made transparent via their bodies and words, revealing the complex emotions, histories, and social relationships that make up the essence of one&rsquo;s personality.&rdquo; &ndash;Shelly Kraicer, CINEMA SCOPE</p> Sunday, May 07 TA’ANG http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2017#showing-47287 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />Continuing Anthology&rsquo;s longstanding commitment to presenting the work of Wang Bing, and as a culmination of our series, &ldquo;Displaced Persons: Migration on Film,&rdquo; we host the theatrical premiere run of Wang&rsquo;s new film, TA&rsquo;ANG, perhaps the most revealing cinematic portrait yet of life in a refugee camp. Taking as his subject the Burmese Ta&rsquo;ang ethnic minority refugees who have crossed to China&rsquo;s Yunnan province to escape a violent insurgency raging near their homes in Myanmar, Wang documents their experiences with the profound patience, palpable attention to detail, and peerless intimacy that distinguished his past masterpieces WEST OF THE TRACKS, FENGMING, and &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART. Wang is possessed of an extraordinary ability to locate in the flux and chaos of his subject matter a clarifying shape and imagery of sometimes devastating power, without ever allowing structural concerns or visual style to take precedence over the lives of the men and women before his camera. TA&rsquo;ANG is as urgent and timely a film as he&rsquo;s made to date.<br /><br />&ldquo;As in his recent asylum expos&eacute;, &rsquo;TIL MADNESS DO US PART, Wang puts a premium on scenes of commiseration amid the unendurable, and sandwiched between the movie&rsquo;s rugged, crudely framed scenes of flight and dogged endurance is a remarkable centerpiece, a collection of conversations by fire- and candlelight between refugees too exhausted to move, too rattled to sleep, caught in Georges de La Tour lighting.&rdquo; &ndash;Nick Pinkerton, ARTFORUM<br /><br />&ldquo;&lsquo;Wang Bing films souls&rsquo; could be a rough approximation of the impossible magic he regularly weaves in these &lsquo;realist&rsquo; documentaries. He accomplishes this thanks to a combination of extraordinary sensitivity to his subjects&rsquo; body language and an uncanny ability to choose just the right distance. Not too close, so as not to intrude on and disrupt the aura around their autonomous dignity and existence; not too far, so as to preserve an extraordinary intimacy that allows us to feel as if we&rsquo;re seeing right through their skins, as if they were made transparent via their bodies and words, revealing the complex emotions, histories, and social relationships that make up the essence of one&rsquo;s personality.&rdquo; &ndash;Shelly Kraicer, CINEMA SCOPE</p> Monday, May 08