Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Sun, 16 Dec 2018 22:40:43 -0500 DEAD SOULS (PART 1) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50132 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />France/Switzerland, 2018, 495 min (3 parts: ca. 165 min each). An Icarus Films and Grasshopper Film Release.<br /><br />In Gansu Province, northwest China, lie the remains of countless prisoners abandoned in the Gobi Desert sixty years ago. Designated as &ldquo;ultra-rightists&rdquo; in the Communist Party&rsquo;s Anti-Rightist campaign of 1957, they starved to death in the Jiabiangou and Mingshui re-education camps. The camps were the subject of THE DITCH (2011), the lone fiction film by the great documentary filmmaker Wang Bing, and they are also at the heart of Wang&rsquo;s latest non-fiction masterpiece, DEAD SOULS. In the works for more than a decade, DEAD SOULS comprises extended, unabbreviated interviews with the survivors of the camps, who deliver eyewitness testimony of immense and urgent historical and cultural importance. Tragic, damning, and sometimes shatteringly grim, these interviews are nevertheless suffused with the humanity and resilience of the now-elderly men and women whose memories of the camps remain vivid. And they are suffused too with the patience and deep commitment of Wang, whose career is a testament to the capacity of documentary filmmaking to shine a spotlight on those whose stories are in danger of being suppressed or actively cast into oblivion. DEAD SOULS is a monument of historical remembrance and reckoning.<br /><br />&ldquo;An 8-hour-and-15-minute documentary is not something you walk into lightly, especially when its subject is the imprisonment and slow-motion murder of human beings. But DEAD SOULS is a powerfully sobering and clear-eyed investigation that justifies its length through the gravity and presence of its testimony. Wang, like Claude Lanzmann in SHOAH, isn&rsquo;t just making a historical documentary; he&rsquo;s using oral memoir to forge an artifact of history. DEAD SOULS&hellip;does just what a movie that&rsquo;s this long should: It uses its intimate sprawl to catalyze your view of something &ndash; in this case, how the totalitarianism of the 20th century actually worked. (One is tempted to say: quite well).&rdquo; &ndash;Owen Gleiberman, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;Wang&rsquo;s activist art cinema compensates for its admitted lack of accessibility and plays a longer game: The exhaustive collection of testimonies in DEAD SOULS immortalizes these stories, and the lives contained within them, ensuring a preservation of individual memory and a cumulative record of history. The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it&rsquo;s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives DEAD SOULS its authority &ndash; and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam C. Mac, SLANT MAGAZINE<br /><br /><em><strong>Please note, there will be special pricing for DEAD SOULS: each part will be $9 general admission, and $6 for AFA Members (there will be no student/senior prices for DEAD SOULS). Tickets will be sold separately for each of the three parts.</strong></em></p> Sunday, December 16 DEAD SOULS (PART 2) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50136 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />France/Switzerland, 2018, 495 min (3 parts: ca. 165 min each). An Icarus Films and Grasshopper Film Release.<br /><br />In Gansu Province, northwest China, lie the remains of countless prisoners abandoned in the Gobi Desert sixty years ago. Designated as &ldquo;ultra-rightists&rdquo; in the Communist Party&rsquo;s Anti-Rightist campaign of 1957, they starved to death in the Jiabiangou and Mingshui re-education camps. The camps were the subject of THE DITCH (2011), the lone fiction film by the great documentary filmmaker Wang Bing, and they are also at the heart of Wang&rsquo;s latest non-fiction masterpiece, DEAD SOULS. In the works for more than a decade, DEAD SOULS comprises extended, unabbreviated interviews with the survivors of the camps, who deliver eyewitness testimony of immense and urgent historical and cultural importance. Tragic, damning, and sometimes shatteringly grim, these interviews are nevertheless suffused with the humanity and resilience of the now-elderly men and women whose memories of the camps remain vivid. And they are suffused too with the patience and deep commitment of Wang, whose career is a testament to the capacity of documentary filmmaking to shine a spotlight on those whose stories are in danger of being suppressed or actively cast into oblivion. DEAD SOULS is a monument of historical remembrance and reckoning.<br /><br />&ldquo;An 8-hour-and-15-minute documentary is not something you walk into lightly, especially when its subject is the imprisonment and slow-motion murder of human beings. But DEAD SOULS is a powerfully sobering and clear-eyed investigation that justifies its length through the gravity and presence of its testimony. Wang, like Claude Lanzmann in SHOAH, isn&rsquo;t just making a historical documentary; he&rsquo;s using oral memoir to forge an artifact of history. DEAD SOULS&hellip;does just what a movie that&rsquo;s this long should: It uses its intimate sprawl to catalyze your view of something &ndash; in this case, how the totalitarianism of the 20th century actually worked. (One is tempted to say: quite well).&rdquo; &ndash;Owen Gleiberman, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;Wang&rsquo;s activist art cinema compensates for its admitted lack of accessibility and plays a longer game: The exhaustive collection of testimonies in DEAD SOULS immortalizes these stories, and the lives contained within them, ensuring a preservation of individual memory and a cumulative record of history. The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it&rsquo;s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives DEAD SOULS its authority &ndash; and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam C. Mac, SLANT MAGAZINE<br /><br /><em><strong>Please note, there will be special pricing for DEAD SOULS: each part will be $9 general admission, and $6 for AFA Members (there will be no student/senior prices for DEAD SOULS). Tickets will be sold separately for each of the three parts.</strong></em></p> Sunday, December 16 SECRET LIFE OF…ANTHOLOGY FILM ARCHIVES – PSYCHEDELIC EDITION http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50154 <p>As part of our occasional &ldquo;Secret Life of&hellip;Anthology Film Archives&rdquo; program, which showcases the film- and video-making efforts of AFA&rsquo;s staff, friends, fellow-travelers, and devotees, our very own Steve Erickson has compiled a selection of psychedelic videos, clips, and performances for our viewing pleasure.<br /><br />&ldquo;Feel the distorted guitars, wailing vocals, and pounding drums as Anthology takes you back to the heyday of psychedelic music. Rather than settling for the most obvious choices &ndash; although some canonical artists are featured &ndash; this program travels around the world in 90 minutes. Showcasing bands from the U.S., U.K., France, West Germany, Brazil, Turkey, Denmark, and Japan, the selection demonstrates how psychedelia became a lingua franca that was transformed by different cultures. While American TV rarely took the counterculture seriously in the late 1960s and early 70s, European TV programs let rock groups play 8-minute long songs and allowed them to take the piss out of the interviewer. Enjoy your mind trip, but don&rsquo;t trip on your mind.&rdquo; &ndash;Steve Erickson</p> Sunday, December 16 DEAD SOULS (PART 3) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50141 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />France/Switzerland, 2018, 495 min (3 parts: ca. 165 min each). An Icarus Films and Grasshopper Film Release.<br /><br />In Gansu Province, northwest China, lie the remains of countless prisoners abandoned in the Gobi Desert sixty years ago. Designated as &ldquo;ultra-rightists&rdquo; in the Communist Party&rsquo;s Anti-Rightist campaign of 1957, they starved to death in the Jiabiangou and Mingshui re-education camps. The camps were the subject of THE DITCH (2011), the lone fiction film by the great documentary filmmaker Wang Bing, and they are also at the heart of Wang&rsquo;s latest non-fiction masterpiece, DEAD SOULS. In the works for more than a decade, DEAD SOULS comprises extended, unabbreviated interviews with the survivors of the camps, who deliver eyewitness testimony of immense and urgent historical and cultural importance. Tragic, damning, and sometimes shatteringly grim, these interviews are nevertheless suffused with the humanity and resilience of the now-elderly men and women whose memories of the camps remain vivid. And they are suffused too with the patience and deep commitment of Wang, whose career is a testament to the capacity of documentary filmmaking to shine a spotlight on those whose stories are in danger of being suppressed or actively cast into oblivion. DEAD SOULS is a monument of historical remembrance and reckoning.<br /><br />&ldquo;An 8-hour-and-15-minute documentary is not something you walk into lightly, especially when its subject is the imprisonment and slow-motion murder of human beings. But DEAD SOULS is a powerfully sobering and clear-eyed investigation that justifies its length through the gravity and presence of its testimony. Wang, like Claude Lanzmann in SHOAH, isn&rsquo;t just making a historical documentary; he&rsquo;s using oral memoir to forge an artifact of history. DEAD SOULS&hellip;does just what a movie that&rsquo;s this long should: It uses its intimate sprawl to catalyze your view of something &ndash; in this case, how the totalitarianism of the 20th century actually worked. (One is tempted to say: quite well).&rdquo; &ndash;Owen Gleiberman, VARIETY<br /><br /><em><strong>Please note, there will be special pricing for DEAD SOULS: each part will be $9 general admission, and $6 for AFA Members (there will be no student/senior prices for DEAD SOULS). Tickets will be sold separately for each of the three parts.</strong></em><br /><br />&ldquo;Wang&rsquo;s activist art cinema compensates for its admitted lack of accessibility and plays a longer game: The exhaustive collection of testimonies in DEAD SOULS immortalizes these stories, and the lives contained within them, ensuring a preservation of individual memory and a cumulative record of history. The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it&rsquo;s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives DEAD SOULS its authority &ndash; and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam C. Mac, SLANT MAGAZINE</p> Sunday, December 16 TERROR NULLIUS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50149 <p>NEW YORK CITY PREMIERE! FILMMAKERS IN PERSON!<br /><br />Soda_Jerk are a two&shy;person art collective who work at the intersection of documentary and speculative fiction. Hailing from Australia but based in New York since 2012, they are fundamentally interested in the politics of images: how they circulate, whom they benefit, and how they can be undone. Their sample&shy;based practice takes the form of films, video installations, cut&shy;up texts, and lecture performances. Anthology hosted them in 2015 for a Show &amp; Tell program showcasing their genuinely subversive and often riotously funny body of work, and we welcome them back for the NYC premiere of their new feature-length piece, TERROR NULLIUS. A political revenge fable that offers an un&shy;writing of Australian national mythology, TERROR NULLIUS works entirely within and against the official archive to achieve a queering and othering of Australian cinema. Part political satire, eco&shy;horror, and road movie, it conjures a world in which minorities and animals conspire, and not&shy;so&shy;nice white guys finish last; where idyllic beaches host race&shy;riots, governments poll love&shy;rights, and the perils of hypermasculinity are overshadowed only by the enduring horror of Australia&rsquo;s colonizing myth of terra nullius (&lsquo;nobody&rsquo;s land&rsquo;).<br /><br />&ldquo;TERROR NULLIUS is a euphoric 55-minute long drunken dance with a raised middle finger and I can think of nothing more Australian than that. By actively reframing the meaning of the dominantly conceived Australian film canon, Soda_Jerk powerfully and practically demonstrates Jonathan Rosenbaum&rsquo;s observation that film canons are &lsquo;an active process of selection rather than a passive one of reportage.&rsquo; Soda_Jerk do not attempt anything so ambitious or ultimately futile as an alternate canon, but rather achieve something far more urgent: they reveal the gaps, the hypocrisies and the biases active within the canon we already have, reflective of a whole spectrum of issues and questions white Australia desperately needs to address.&rdquo; &ndash;Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, ARTLINK<br /><br />&ldquo;A weird, dazzling, kinetic, dizzyingly ambitious, sensationally mishmashed beast of an Australian film, one part video art installation project, one part revisionist documentary.&rdquo; &ndash;THE GUARDIAN<br /><br />&ldquo;TERROR NULLIUS is a rogue remapping of national mythology, where a misogynistic remark is met with the sharp beak of a bird, feminist bike gangs rampage, and bicentenary celebrations are ravaged by flesh-eating sheep. By intricately remixing fragments of Australia&rsquo;s pop culture and film legacy, TERROR NULLIUS interrogates the unstable entanglement of fiction that underpins the country&rsquo;s vexed sense of self.&rdquo; &ndash;AUSTRALIAN CENTER FOR THE MOVING IMAGE<br /><br /></p> Sunday, December 16 1968 ON SCREEN: AMERICAN REVOLUTION 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50152 <p>Throughout this year we have been presenting screenings marking the 50th anniversary of the politically, socially, and culturally tumultuous year of 1968. For the final program in the series, we host the NYC premiere of the Chicago Film Archives&rsquo; new preservation of AMERICAN REVOLUTION 2, an extraordinary document of the 1968 Democratic National Convention and its aftermath that reveals often overlooked dimensions of that infamous event.<br /><br />Co-presented by the Goethe-Institut New York; special thanks to Sara Stevenson (Goethe-Institut New York) and Michelle Puetz (Chicago Film Archives).<br /><br />Howard Alk, Mike Gray, and The Film Group Inc. Chicago<br />AMERICAN REVOLUTION 2<br />1969, 77 min, 35mm. Preserved by the Chicago Film Archives with major support from the National Film Preservation Foundation, Rebuild Foundation, and Black Cinema House.<br /><br />The Film Group was a loosely knit collective of commercial and documentary filmmakers (including Mike Gray, Chuck Olin, Howard Alk, and William Cottle) based in Chicago during the latter half of the 1960s who applied cin&eacute;ma-v&eacute;rit&eacute; filmmaking techniques to the commercials and sponsored films they produced for their clients. But the climate of social unrest that sprang from the Vietnam War and the civil rights movement contributed to a growing dissonance between their commercial and documentary work. During the turbulence of the infamous 1968 Democratic National Convention (and in spite of a shoot for Kentucky Fried Chicken taking place in their studio), Mike Gray and other filmmakers from the collective took their cameras down to the streets to record the confrontations erupting between protesters and police.<br /><br />AMERICAN REVOLUTION 2 charts the filmmakers&rsquo; journey to a deeper understanding of race relations and the political reality outside of the student demonstrations that were taking center-stage nationwide. They followed Black Panther Bob Lee as he attempted to find common cause with the poor Appalachian white community living in Chicago&rsquo;s blue-collar Uptown neighborhood. The seemingly disparate groups struggled to find shared social and political objectives that might overcome racial differences &ndash; police violence, poverty, lack of employment, and poor living conditions. One of the most poignant scenes in the film takes place when Panther Bob Lee gently encourages a young white mom, with toddler at her side, to speak up at a community meeting. This potential for interracial political synthesis lies at the heart of the film.<br /><br /></p> Monday, December 17 DEAD SOULS (PART 2) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50137 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />France/Switzerland, 2018, 495 min (3 parts: ca. 165 min each). An Icarus Films and Grasshopper Film Release.<br /><br />In Gansu Province, northwest China, lie the remains of countless prisoners abandoned in the Gobi Desert sixty years ago. Designated as &ldquo;ultra-rightists&rdquo; in the Communist Party&rsquo;s Anti-Rightist campaign of 1957, they starved to death in the Jiabiangou and Mingshui re-education camps. The camps were the subject of THE DITCH (2011), the lone fiction film by the great documentary filmmaker Wang Bing, and they are also at the heart of Wang&rsquo;s latest non-fiction masterpiece, DEAD SOULS. In the works for more than a decade, DEAD SOULS comprises extended, unabbreviated interviews with the survivors of the camps, who deliver eyewitness testimony of immense and urgent historical and cultural importance. Tragic, damning, and sometimes shatteringly grim, these interviews are nevertheless suffused with the humanity and resilience of the now-elderly men and women whose memories of the camps remain vivid. And they are suffused too with the patience and deep commitment of Wang, whose career is a testament to the capacity of documentary filmmaking to shine a spotlight on those whose stories are in danger of being suppressed or actively cast into oblivion. DEAD SOULS is a monument of historical remembrance and reckoning.<br /><br />&ldquo;An 8-hour-and-15-minute documentary is not something you walk into lightly, especially when its subject is the imprisonment and slow-motion murder of human beings. But DEAD SOULS is a powerfully sobering and clear-eyed investigation that justifies its length through the gravity and presence of its testimony. Wang, like Claude Lanzmann in SHOAH, isn&rsquo;t just making a historical documentary; he&rsquo;s using oral memoir to forge an artifact of history. DEAD SOULS&hellip;does just what a movie that&rsquo;s this long should: It uses its intimate sprawl to catalyze your view of something &ndash; in this case, how the totalitarianism of the 20th century actually worked. (One is tempted to say: quite well).&rdquo; &ndash;Owen Gleiberman, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;Wang&rsquo;s activist art cinema compensates for its admitted lack of accessibility and plays a longer game: The exhaustive collection of testimonies in DEAD SOULS immortalizes these stories, and the lives contained within them, ensuring a preservation of individual memory and a cumulative record of history. The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it&rsquo;s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives DEAD SOULS its authority &ndash; and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam C. Mac, SLANT MAGAZINE<br /><br /><em><strong>Please note, there will be special pricing for DEAD SOULS: each part will be $9 general admission, and $6 for AFA Members (there will be no student/senior prices for DEAD SOULS). Tickets will be sold separately for each of the three parts.</strong></em></p> Monday, December 17 THE TERRITORIES / LOS TERRITORIOS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-49898 <p>After the attack on Charlie Hebdo, Iv&aacute;n, a young film producer and self-proclaimed &ldquo;frivolous&rdquo; son of a prominent Argentine journalist, sets off on a journey to sites of contemporary geopolitical conflict. It is no easy undertaking. Determining where the frontline ends and this wannabe war correspondent&rsquo;s ego trip begins proves even more difficult.<br />It&rsquo;s seemingly a miracle that this film even exists. As the director and protagonist Iv&aacute;n Granovsky relates with a sense of self-mockery, his three previous attempts to make a film turned into fiascos, so he decided to follow in the footsteps of his father. But from the refugee crisis in Greece to the less-democratic Brazil, from the Basque Country to Jerusalem, Granovsky is always too late, too early, in the wrong place, or asking clumsy questions. THE TERRITORIES is a coming-of-age fiction nestled inside a geopolitical documentary.<br /><br /></p> Tuesday, December 18 DEAD SOULS (PART 3) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50142 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />France/Switzerland, 2018, 495 min (3 parts: ca. 165 min each). An Icarus Films and Grasshopper Film Release.<br /><br />In Gansu Province, northwest China, lie the remains of countless prisoners abandoned in the Gobi Desert sixty years ago. Designated as &ldquo;ultra-rightists&rdquo; in the Communist Party&rsquo;s Anti-Rightist campaign of 1957, they starved to death in the Jiabiangou and Mingshui re-education camps. The camps were the subject of THE DITCH (2011), the lone fiction film by the great documentary filmmaker Wang Bing, and they are also at the heart of Wang&rsquo;s latest non-fiction masterpiece, DEAD SOULS. In the works for more than a decade, DEAD SOULS comprises extended, unabbreviated interviews with the survivors of the camps, who deliver eyewitness testimony of immense and urgent historical and cultural importance. Tragic, damning, and sometimes shatteringly grim, these interviews are nevertheless suffused with the humanity and resilience of the now-elderly men and women whose memories of the camps remain vivid. And they are suffused too with the patience and deep commitment of Wang, whose career is a testament to the capacity of documentary filmmaking to shine a spotlight on those whose stories are in danger of being suppressed or actively cast into oblivion. DEAD SOULS is a monument of historical remembrance and reckoning.<br /><br />&ldquo;An 8-hour-and-15-minute documentary is not something you walk into lightly, especially when its subject is the imprisonment and slow-motion murder of human beings. But DEAD SOULS is a powerfully sobering and clear-eyed investigation that justifies its length through the gravity and presence of its testimony. Wang, like Claude Lanzmann in SHOAH, isn&rsquo;t just making a historical documentary; he&rsquo;s using oral memoir to forge an artifact of history. DEAD SOULS&hellip;does just what a movie that&rsquo;s this long should: It uses its intimate sprawl to catalyze your view of something &ndash; in this case, how the totalitarianism of the 20th century actually worked. (One is tempted to say: quite well).&rdquo; &ndash;Owen Gleiberman, VARIETY<br /><br /><em><strong>Please note, there will be special pricing for DEAD SOULS: each part will be $9 general admission, and $6 for AFA Members (there will be no student/senior prices for DEAD SOULS). Tickets will be sold separately for each of the three parts.</strong></em><br /><br />&ldquo;Wang&rsquo;s activist art cinema compensates for its admitted lack of accessibility and plays a longer game: The exhaustive collection of testimonies in DEAD SOULS immortalizes these stories, and the lives contained within them, ensuring a preservation of individual memory and a cumulative record of history. The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it&rsquo;s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives DEAD SOULS its authority &ndash; and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam C. Mac, SLANT MAGAZINE</p> Tuesday, December 18 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-49952 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, December 19 DEAD SOULS (PART 1) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50133 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />France/Switzerland, 2018, 495 min (3 parts: ca. 165 min each). An Icarus Films and Grasshopper Film Release.<br /><br />In Gansu Province, northwest China, lie the remains of countless prisoners abandoned in the Gobi Desert sixty years ago. Designated as &ldquo;ultra-rightists&rdquo; in the Communist Party&rsquo;s Anti-Rightist campaign of 1957, they starved to death in the Jiabiangou and Mingshui re-education camps. The camps were the subject of THE DITCH (2011), the lone fiction film by the great documentary filmmaker Wang Bing, and they are also at the heart of Wang&rsquo;s latest non-fiction masterpiece, DEAD SOULS. In the works for more than a decade, DEAD SOULS comprises extended, unabbreviated interviews with the survivors of the camps, who deliver eyewitness testimony of immense and urgent historical and cultural importance. Tragic, damning, and sometimes shatteringly grim, these interviews are nevertheless suffused with the humanity and resilience of the now-elderly men and women whose memories of the camps remain vivid. And they are suffused too with the patience and deep commitment of Wang, whose career is a testament to the capacity of documentary filmmaking to shine a spotlight on those whose stories are in danger of being suppressed or actively cast into oblivion. DEAD SOULS is a monument of historical remembrance and reckoning.<br /><br />&ldquo;An 8-hour-and-15-minute documentary is not something you walk into lightly, especially when its subject is the imprisonment and slow-motion murder of human beings. But DEAD SOULS is a powerfully sobering and clear-eyed investigation that justifies its length through the gravity and presence of its testimony. Wang, like Claude Lanzmann in SHOAH, isn&rsquo;t just making a historical documentary; he&rsquo;s using oral memoir to forge an artifact of history. DEAD SOULS&hellip;does just what a movie that&rsquo;s this long should: It uses its intimate sprawl to catalyze your view of something &ndash; in this case, how the totalitarianism of the 20th century actually worked. (One is tempted to say: quite well).&rdquo; &ndash;Owen Gleiberman, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;Wang&rsquo;s activist art cinema compensates for its admitted lack of accessibility and plays a longer game: The exhaustive collection of testimonies in DEAD SOULS immortalizes these stories, and the lives contained within them, ensuring a preservation of individual memory and a cumulative record of history. The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it&rsquo;s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives DEAD SOULS its authority &ndash; and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam C. Mac, SLANT MAGAZINE<br /><br /><em><strong>Please note, there will be special pricing for DEAD SOULS: each part will be $9 general admission, and $6 for AFA Members (there will be no student/senior prices for DEAD SOULS). Tickets will be sold separately for each of the three parts.</strong></em></p> Wednesday, December 19 [POSTPONED] EC: DIARIES, NOTES & SKETCHES (WALDEN) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50201 <p>Filmed 1964-68; edited 1968-69. &ldquo;Since 1950 I have been keeping a film diary. I have been walking around with my Bolex and reacting to the immediate reality: situations, friends, New York, seasons of the year. On some days I shot ten frames, on others ten seconds, still on others ten minutes. Or I shot nothing. When one writes diaries, it&rsquo;s a retrospective process: you sit down, you look back at your day, and you write it all down. To keep a film (camera) diary, is to react (with your camera) immediately, now, this instant: either you get it now, or you don&rsquo;t get it at all.&rdquo; &ndash;J.M.<br /><br />&ldquo;I make home movies &ndash; therefore I live. I live &ndash; therefore I make home movies.&rdquo; &ndash;from the soundtrack</p> <p>[<em><strong>Please note: the screening of DIARIES, NOTES &amp; SKETCHES (WALDEN) scheduled for December 20 has been postponed. It has been rescheduled for Wednesday, January 2 at 7:00.&nbsp; We apologize for the inconvenience.</strong></em>]</p> Thursday, December 20 DEAD SOULS (PART 2) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50138 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />France/Switzerland, 2018, 495 min (3 parts: ca. 165 min each). An Icarus Films and Grasshopper Film Release.<br /><br />In Gansu Province, northwest China, lie the remains of countless prisoners abandoned in the Gobi Desert sixty years ago. Designated as &ldquo;ultra-rightists&rdquo; in the Communist Party&rsquo;s Anti-Rightist campaign of 1957, they starved to death in the Jiabiangou and Mingshui re-education camps. The camps were the subject of THE DITCH (2011), the lone fiction film by the great documentary filmmaker Wang Bing, and they are also at the heart of Wang&rsquo;s latest non-fiction masterpiece, DEAD SOULS. In the works for more than a decade, DEAD SOULS comprises extended, unabbreviated interviews with the survivors of the camps, who deliver eyewitness testimony of immense and urgent historical and cultural importance. Tragic, damning, and sometimes shatteringly grim, these interviews are nevertheless suffused with the humanity and resilience of the now-elderly men and women whose memories of the camps remain vivid. And they are suffused too with the patience and deep commitment of Wang, whose career is a testament to the capacity of documentary filmmaking to shine a spotlight on those whose stories are in danger of being suppressed or actively cast into oblivion. DEAD SOULS is a monument of historical remembrance and reckoning.<br /><br />&ldquo;An 8-hour-and-15-minute documentary is not something you walk into lightly, especially when its subject is the imprisonment and slow-motion murder of human beings. But DEAD SOULS is a powerfully sobering and clear-eyed investigation that justifies its length through the gravity and presence of its testimony. Wang, like Claude Lanzmann in SHOAH, isn&rsquo;t just making a historical documentary; he&rsquo;s using oral memoir to forge an artifact of history. DEAD SOULS&hellip;does just what a movie that&rsquo;s this long should: It uses its intimate sprawl to catalyze your view of something &ndash; in this case, how the totalitarianism of the 20th century actually worked. (One is tempted to say: quite well).&rdquo; &ndash;Owen Gleiberman, VARIETY<br /><br />&ldquo;Wang&rsquo;s activist art cinema compensates for its admitted lack of accessibility and plays a longer game: The exhaustive collection of testimonies in DEAD SOULS immortalizes these stories, and the lives contained within them, ensuring a preservation of individual memory and a cumulative record of history. The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it&rsquo;s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives DEAD SOULS its authority &ndash; and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam C. Mac, SLANT MAGAZINE<br /><br /><em><strong>Please note, there will be special pricing for DEAD SOULS: each part will be $9 general admission, and $6 for AFA Members (there will be no student/senior prices for DEAD SOULS). Tickets will be sold separately for each of the three parts.</strong></em></p> Thursday, December 20 EC: REMINISCENCES OF A JOURNEY TO LITHUANIA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50111 <p>Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from The Film Foundation. Special thanks to Cineric, Inc., and Trackwise.<br /><br />&ldquo;The film consists of four parts. The first part contains some footage from my first years in America, 1949-52. The second part was shot in August 1971 in Lithuania. The third part is in Elmshorn, near Hamburg, where I spent eight months in a forced labor camp. The fourth part is in Vienna (1971) with Peter Kubelka, Nitsch, Annette Michelson, Ken Jacobs, etc. The film deals with home, memory, and culture.&rdquo; &ndash;J.M.<br /><strong><em></em></strong></p> Friday, December 21 DEAD SOULS (PART 3) http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2018#showing-50143 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br />France/Switzerland, 2018, 495 min (3 parts: ca. 165 min each). An Icarus Films and Grasshopper Film Release.<br /><br />In Gansu Province, northwest China, lie the remains of countless prisoners abandoned in the Gobi Desert sixty years ago. Designated as &ldquo;ultra-rightists&rdquo; in the Communist Party&rsquo;s Anti-Rightist campaign of 1957, they starved to death in the Jiabiangou and Mingshui re-education camps. The camps were the subject of THE DITCH (2011), the lone fiction film by the great documentary filmmaker Wang Bing, and they are also at the heart of Wang&rsquo;s latest non-fiction masterpiece, DEAD SOULS. In the works for more than a decade, DEAD SOULS comprises extended, unabbreviated interviews with the survivors of the camps, who deliver eyewitness testimony of immense and urgent historical and cultural importance. Tragic, damning, and sometimes shatteringly grim, these interviews are nevertheless suffused with the humanity and resilience of the now-elderly men and women whose memories of the camps remain vivid. And they are suffused too with the patience and deep commitment of Wang, whose career is a testament to the capacity of documentary filmmaking to shine a spotlight on those whose stories are in danger of being suppressed or actively cast into oblivion. DEAD SOULS is a monument of historical remembrance and reckoning.<br /><br />&ldquo;An 8-hour-and-15-minute documentary is not something you walk into lightly, especially when its subject is the imprisonment and slow-motion murder of human beings. But DEAD SOULS is a powerfully sobering and clear-eyed investigation that justifies its length through the gravity and presence of its testimony. Wang, like Claude Lanzmann in SHOAH, isn&rsquo;t just making a historical documentary; he&rsquo;s using oral memoir to forge an artifact of history. DEAD SOULS&hellip;does just what a movie that&rsquo;s this long should: It uses its intimate sprawl to catalyze your view of something &ndash; in this case, how the totalitarianism of the 20th century actually worked. (One is tempted to say: quite well).&rdquo; &ndash;Owen Gleiberman, VARIETY<br /><br /><em><strong>Please note, there will be special pricing for DEAD SOULS: each part will be $9 general admission, and $6 for AFA Members (there will be no student/senior prices for DEAD SOULS). Tickets will be sold separately for each of the three parts.</strong></em><br /><br />&ldquo;Wang&rsquo;s activist art cinema compensates for its admitted lack of accessibility and plays a longer game: The exhaustive collection of testimonies in DEAD SOULS immortalizes these stories, and the lives contained within them, ensuring a preservation of individual memory and a cumulative record of history. The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it&rsquo;s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives DEAD SOULS its authority &ndash; and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.&rdquo; &ndash;Sam C. Mac, SLANT MAGAZINE</p> Friday, December 21