Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Mon, 15 Oct 2018 16:05:48 -0400 CLASSICAL PERIOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49849 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Ted Fendt has made a name for himself in recent years thanks to his drily comic, anthropologically sharp short films about the denizens of suburban Philadelphia, as well as his debut feature, SHORT STAY, which beautifully expanded on the qualities of the short films. His second feature, CLASSICAL PERIOD is unmistakably Fendt-ian in its formal precision, its unwavering dedication to the medium of 16mm, and its focus on a cast of characters who are distinctly (and unapologetically) social outsiders. But in other ways it&rsquo;s a significant departure, a proudly unique and daringly structured film with little concern for pleasing its audience (new or established).<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD revolves around a group of men and women &ndash; predominantly Cal, but also Evelyn, Chris, Sam, and Michael &ndash; who hold regular meetings to discuss art, history, and culture, and in particular Henry Longfellow&rsquo;s translation of Dante&rsquo;s &ldquo;Divine Comedy.&rdquo; Most of the film is devoted to these five discussing (and at times monologuing on) their various and invariably freelance readings together, though Fendt devotes a remarkable amount of time as well to documenting the simple, solitary act of reading.<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD is a film whose conception is both bold and astonishingly subtle, and one that functions simultaneously on multiple levels. It&rsquo;s equally attuned to the substance of Cal and company&rsquo;s discussions and to the personalities, neuroses, and unspoken social dynamics bubbling beneath what appears to be an implacably cerebral surface. Though this idea of verbal expression as a tactic of distraction is clearly reminiscent of &Eacute;ric Rohmer, Fendt&rsquo;s approach to framing, editing, and acting style are even more indebted to his mentors, Jean-Marie Straub and Dani&egrave;le Huillet (Fendt edited a volume on Straub/Huillet for the Austrian Film Museum in 2016). As a result, when the emotional and psychological sides of his protagonists&rsquo; lives do breach to the surface, it comes as a shock, a retroactive sign of a dimension that was operating in camouflage all along. CLASSICAL PERIOD finds Fendt further developing his unique cinematic voice &ndash; somehow deadpan funny, genuinely intellectual, and darkly melancholic all at once &ndash; while embracing a new formal and conceptual richness.<br /><br />&ldquo;What are a few references among friends? But for Cal and his circle, it&rsquo;s hardly a few. They barely conduct a single conversation that doesn&rsquo;t revolve around architecture, literature, theology, history. Each set of ideas leads seamlessly into the next, until the flow they form is endless&hellip;. When Cal, Evelyn, Chris et al. exchange all this absurdly specific knowledge, they do so with such earnest relentlessness that it&rsquo;s hard to suppress a smile, although melancholy is never far away.&rdquo; &ndash; James Lattimer, BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;I felt myself at an impasse with the kind of behavioral-composite character studies I had been making. In this film, I have removed narrative and its related trappings to focus solely on people, most notably Cal. The film contains no exposition, which, even if I had barely used it in my previous films, still felt like a hindrance. Here there is simply what the camera presents, projected in the present tense.&rdquo; &ndash;Ted Fendt<br /><br /><br /></p> Monday, October 15 FLAHERTY NYC, PROG. 2: AN EVENING WITH TAN PIN PIN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49883 <p>Co-presented with Colgate University. Tan Pin Pin in person.<br /><br />Equal parts incisive and meditative, the films of Singaporean documentarian Tan Pin Pin offer nuanced and bittersweet accounts of the contradictions that frame life in her home country. In contrasting the mundane with the controversial, the public with the private, Tan&rsquo;s films shed light on the state of affairs in the ultramodern and rapidly changing city-state. The films presented here consider numerous instances of displacement and exile caused by Singapore&rsquo;s increasingly authoritarian government, which has affected both the living and the deceased &ndash; and in the case of TO SINGAPORE WITH LOVE, has led to the banning of public screenings in the country.<br /><br />Tan Pin Pin MOVING HOUSE (2001, 22 min, digital)<br /><br />Tan Pin Pin<br />TO SINGAPORE WITH LOVE<br />2013, 70 min, DCP<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.<br /><br /></p> Monday, October 15 CLASSICAL PERIOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49850 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Ted Fendt has made a name for himself in recent years thanks to his drily comic, anthropologically sharp short films about the denizens of suburban Philadelphia, as well as his debut feature, SHORT STAY, which beautifully expanded on the qualities of the short films. His second feature, CLASSICAL PERIOD is unmistakably Fendt-ian in its formal precision, its unwavering dedication to the medium of 16mm, and its focus on a cast of characters who are distinctly (and unapologetically) social outsiders. But in other ways it&rsquo;s a significant departure, a proudly unique and daringly structured film with little concern for pleasing its audience (new or established).<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD revolves around a group of men and women &ndash; predominantly Cal, but also Evelyn, Chris, Sam, and Michael &ndash; who hold regular meetings to discuss art, history, and culture, and in particular Henry Longfellow&rsquo;s translation of Dante&rsquo;s &ldquo;Divine Comedy.&rdquo; Most of the film is devoted to these five discussing (and at times monologuing on) their various and invariably freelance readings together, though Fendt devotes a remarkable amount of time as well to documenting the simple, solitary act of reading.<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD is a film whose conception is both bold and astonishingly subtle, and one that functions simultaneously on multiple levels. It&rsquo;s equally attuned to the substance of Cal and company&rsquo;s discussions and to the personalities, neuroses, and unspoken social dynamics bubbling beneath what appears to be an implacably cerebral surface. Though this idea of verbal expression as a tactic of distraction is clearly reminiscent of &Eacute;ric Rohmer, Fendt&rsquo;s approach to framing, editing, and acting style are even more indebted to his mentors, Jean-Marie Straub and Dani&egrave;le Huillet (Fendt edited a volume on Straub/Huillet for the Austrian Film Museum in 2016). As a result, when the emotional and psychological sides of his protagonists&rsquo; lives do breach to the surface, it comes as a shock, a retroactive sign of a dimension that was operating in camouflage all along. CLASSICAL PERIOD finds Fendt further developing his unique cinematic voice &ndash; somehow deadpan funny, genuinely intellectual, and darkly melancholic all at once &ndash; while embracing a new formal and conceptual richness.<br /><br />&ldquo;What are a few references among friends? But for Cal and his circle, it&rsquo;s hardly a few. They barely conduct a single conversation that doesn&rsquo;t revolve around architecture, literature, theology, history. Each set of ideas leads seamlessly into the next, until the flow they form is endless&hellip;. When Cal, Evelyn, Chris et al. exchange all this absurdly specific knowledge, they do so with such earnest relentlessness that it&rsquo;s hard to suppress a smile, although melancholy is never far away.&rdquo; &ndash; James Lattimer, BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;I felt myself at an impasse with the kind of behavioral-composite character studies I had been making. In this film, I have removed narrative and its related trappings to focus solely on people, most notably Cal. The film contains no exposition, which, even if I had barely used it in my previous films, still felt like a hindrance. Here there is simply what the camera presents, projected in the present tense.&rdquo; &ndash;Ted Fendt<br /><br /><br /></p> Monday, October 15 BARBARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49833 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br /><em><strong>JEANNE BALIBAR IN PERSON ON OPENING NIGHT, FRI, OCT 12, FOR A Q&amp;A FOLLOWING THE 6:45 SHOW AND AN INTRO TO THE 9:15 SCREENING!</strong></em><br /><br />As Anthology audiences know very well (thanks to our Fall 2015 retrospective), Mathieu Amalric is not only an acclaimed actor who has worked with everyone from Arnaud Desplechin, Olivier Assayas, and Alain Resnais to Stephen Spielberg, David Cronenberg, Roman Polanski, Guy Maddin, and Wes Anderson, he is also an extraordinary filmmaker in his own right. His seventh feature-length film as a director is both a heartfelt tribute to the legendary chanteuse Barbara (1930-97), and a vehicle for another peerlessly talented French luminary (and frequent Amalric collaborator), the actress and singer Jeanne Balibar (the subject of her own retrospective co-presented by Anthology and the French Institute Alliance Fran&ccedil;aise; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/49857">here</a> for more details).<br /><br />Amalric&rsquo;s films are remarkable for their intuitive freedom, and their emphasis on emotional textures and states of feeling rather than on straightforward narrative construction or easily grasped meanings. BARBARA is a case in point: eschewing anything like a coherent, birth-to-death account of the events of her life, the film instead orchestrates fragments of the singer&rsquo;s life and performances into a free and quasi-abstract meditation on Barbara&rsquo;s identity and cultural presence. And by casting Balibar not as Barbara per se but more self-referentially as an actress making a film-within-the-film about the singer, his film becomes an even broader investigation into the concept of biographical filmmaking, representation, and identity. It&rsquo;s an experimental biopic in the tradition of Stanley Kwan&rsquo;s CENTER STAGE, Peter Watkins&rsquo;s EDVARD MUNCH, and Paul Leduc&rsquo;s FRIDA, and features a typically riveting, charismatic performance from Balibar (who will be here in person for opening night!).<br /><br />&ldquo;To fans of the mononymous Barbara &ndash; the delicate-voiced, emotionally acute French chanteuse adored by everyone from Jacques Brel to Fran&ccedil;ois Mitterand &ndash; Amalric&rsquo;s mega-meta, dreamily blurred biopic-within-a-film may seem a bemusing tribute to a national icon. To those unfamiliar with the singer and her work, this film is likely to be a more perplexing experience still: an elusive ghost of a celebrity portrait, a meditation on likeness and impersonation in which the subject, the actor and the performance become difficult to prise apart on screen.&rdquo; &ndash;Guy Lodge, THE GUARDIAN<br /><br />Special thanks to Mathilde Rottier (Gaumont).<br /><br /></p> Monday, October 15 BARBARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49834 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br /><em><strong>JEANNE BALIBAR IN PERSON ON OPENING NIGHT, FRI, OCT 12, FOR A Q&amp;A FOLLOWING THE 6:45 SHOW AND AN INTRO TO THE 9:15 SCREENING!</strong></em><br /><br />As Anthology audiences know very well (thanks to our Fall 2015 retrospective), Mathieu Amalric is not only an acclaimed actor who has worked with everyone from Arnaud Desplechin, Olivier Assayas, and Alain Resnais to Stephen Spielberg, David Cronenberg, Roman Polanski, Guy Maddin, and Wes Anderson, he is also an extraordinary filmmaker in his own right. His seventh feature-length film as a director is both a heartfelt tribute to the legendary chanteuse Barbara (1930-97), and a vehicle for another peerlessly talented French luminary (and frequent Amalric collaborator), the actress and singer Jeanne Balibar (the subject of her own retrospective co-presented by Anthology and the French Institute Alliance Fran&ccedil;aise; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/49857">here</a> for more details).<br /><br />Amalric&rsquo;s films are remarkable for their intuitive freedom, and their emphasis on emotional textures and states of feeling rather than on straightforward narrative construction or easily grasped meanings. BARBARA is a case in point: eschewing anything like a coherent, birth-to-death account of the events of her life, the film instead orchestrates fragments of the singer&rsquo;s life and performances into a free and quasi-abstract meditation on Barbara&rsquo;s identity and cultural presence. And by casting Balibar not as Barbara per se but more self-referentially as an actress making a film-within-the-film about the singer, his film becomes an even broader investigation into the concept of biographical filmmaking, representation, and identity. It&rsquo;s an experimental biopic in the tradition of Stanley Kwan&rsquo;s CENTER STAGE, Peter Watkins&rsquo;s EDVARD MUNCH, and Paul Leduc&rsquo;s FRIDA, and features a typically riveting, charismatic performance from Balibar (who will be here in person for opening night!).<br /><br />&ldquo;To fans of the mononymous Barbara &ndash; the delicate-voiced, emotionally acute French chanteuse adored by everyone from Jacques Brel to Fran&ccedil;ois Mitterand &ndash; Amalric&rsquo;s mega-meta, dreamily blurred biopic-within-a-film may seem a bemusing tribute to a national icon. To those unfamiliar with the singer and her work, this film is likely to be a more perplexing experience still: an elusive ghost of a celebrity portrait, a meditation on likeness and impersonation in which the subject, the actor and the performance become difficult to prise apart on screen.&rdquo; &ndash;Guy Lodge, THE GUARDIAN<br /><br />Special thanks to Mathilde Rottier (Gaumont).<br /><br /></p> Tuesday, October 16 CLASSICAL PERIOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49851 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Ted Fendt has made a name for himself in recent years thanks to his drily comic, anthropologically sharp short films about the denizens of suburban Philadelphia, as well as his debut feature, SHORT STAY, which beautifully expanded on the qualities of the short films. His second feature, CLASSICAL PERIOD is unmistakably Fendt-ian in its formal precision, its unwavering dedication to the medium of 16mm, and its focus on a cast of characters who are distinctly (and unapologetically) social outsiders. But in other ways it&rsquo;s a significant departure, a proudly unique and daringly structured film with little concern for pleasing its audience (new or established).<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD revolves around a group of men and women &ndash; predominantly Cal, but also Evelyn, Chris, Sam, and Michael &ndash; who hold regular meetings to discuss art, history, and culture, and in particular Henry Longfellow&rsquo;s translation of Dante&rsquo;s &ldquo;Divine Comedy.&rdquo; Most of the film is devoted to these five discussing (and at times monologuing on) their various and invariably freelance readings together, though Fendt devotes a remarkable amount of time as well to documenting the simple, solitary act of reading.<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD is a film whose conception is both bold and astonishingly subtle, and one that functions simultaneously on multiple levels. It&rsquo;s equally attuned to the substance of Cal and company&rsquo;s discussions and to the personalities, neuroses, and unspoken social dynamics bubbling beneath what appears to be an implacably cerebral surface. Though this idea of verbal expression as a tactic of distraction is clearly reminiscent of &Eacute;ric Rohmer, Fendt&rsquo;s approach to framing, editing, and acting style are even more indebted to his mentors, Jean-Marie Straub and Dani&egrave;le Huillet (Fendt edited a volume on Straub/Huillet for the Austrian Film Museum in 2016). As a result, when the emotional and psychological sides of his protagonists&rsquo; lives do breach to the surface, it comes as a shock, a retroactive sign of a dimension that was operating in camouflage all along. CLASSICAL PERIOD finds Fendt further developing his unique cinematic voice &ndash; somehow deadpan funny, genuinely intellectual, and darkly melancholic all at once &ndash; while embracing a new formal and conceptual richness.<br /><br />&ldquo;What are a few references among friends? But for Cal and his circle, it&rsquo;s hardly a few. They barely conduct a single conversation that doesn&rsquo;t revolve around architecture, literature, theology, history. Each set of ideas leads seamlessly into the next, until the flow they form is endless&hellip;. When Cal, Evelyn, Chris et al. exchange all this absurdly specific knowledge, they do so with such earnest relentlessness that it&rsquo;s hard to suppress a smile, although melancholy is never far away.&rdquo; &ndash; James Lattimer, BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;I felt myself at an impasse with the kind of behavioral-composite character studies I had been making. In this film, I have removed narrative and its related trappings to focus solely on people, most notably Cal. The film contains no exposition, which, even if I had barely used it in my previous films, still felt like a hindrance. Here there is simply what the camera presents, projected in the present tense.&rdquo; &ndash;Ted Fendt<br /><br /><br /></p> Tuesday, October 16 CLASSICAL PERIOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49852 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Ted Fendt has made a name for himself in recent years thanks to his drily comic, anthropologically sharp short films about the denizens of suburban Philadelphia, as well as his debut feature, SHORT STAY, which beautifully expanded on the qualities of the short films. His second feature, CLASSICAL PERIOD is unmistakably Fendt-ian in its formal precision, its unwavering dedication to the medium of 16mm, and its focus on a cast of characters who are distinctly (and unapologetically) social outsiders. But in other ways it&rsquo;s a significant departure, a proudly unique and daringly structured film with little concern for pleasing its audience (new or established).<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD revolves around a group of men and women &ndash; predominantly Cal, but also Evelyn, Chris, Sam, and Michael &ndash; who hold regular meetings to discuss art, history, and culture, and in particular Henry Longfellow&rsquo;s translation of Dante&rsquo;s &ldquo;Divine Comedy.&rdquo; Most of the film is devoted to these five discussing (and at times monologuing on) their various and invariably freelance readings together, though Fendt devotes a remarkable amount of time as well to documenting the simple, solitary act of reading.<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD is a film whose conception is both bold and astonishingly subtle, and one that functions simultaneously on multiple levels. It&rsquo;s equally attuned to the substance of Cal and company&rsquo;s discussions and to the personalities, neuroses, and unspoken social dynamics bubbling beneath what appears to be an implacably cerebral surface. Though this idea of verbal expression as a tactic of distraction is clearly reminiscent of &Eacute;ric Rohmer, Fendt&rsquo;s approach to framing, editing, and acting style are even more indebted to his mentors, Jean-Marie Straub and Dani&egrave;le Huillet (Fendt edited a volume on Straub/Huillet for the Austrian Film Museum in 2016). As a result, when the emotional and psychological sides of his protagonists&rsquo; lives do breach to the surface, it comes as a shock, a retroactive sign of a dimension that was operating in camouflage all along. CLASSICAL PERIOD finds Fendt further developing his unique cinematic voice &ndash; somehow deadpan funny, genuinely intellectual, and darkly melancholic all at once &ndash; while embracing a new formal and conceptual richness.<br /><br />&ldquo;What are a few references among friends? But for Cal and his circle, it&rsquo;s hardly a few. They barely conduct a single conversation that doesn&rsquo;t revolve around architecture, literature, theology, history. Each set of ideas leads seamlessly into the next, until the flow they form is endless&hellip;. When Cal, Evelyn, Chris et al. exchange all this absurdly specific knowledge, they do so with such earnest relentlessness that it&rsquo;s hard to suppress a smile, although melancholy is never far away.&rdquo; &ndash; James Lattimer, BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;I felt myself at an impasse with the kind of behavioral-composite character studies I had been making. In this film, I have removed narrative and its related trappings to focus solely on people, most notably Cal. The film contains no exposition, which, even if I had barely used it in my previous films, still felt like a hindrance. Here there is simply what the camera presents, projected in the present tense.&rdquo; &ndash;Ted Fendt<br /><br /><br /></p> Tuesday, October 16 BARBARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49835 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br /><em><strong>JEANNE BALIBAR IN PERSON ON OPENING NIGHT, FRI, OCT 12, FOR A Q&amp;A FOLLOWING THE 6:45 SHOW AND AN INTRO TO THE 9:15 SCREENING!</strong></em><br /><br />As Anthology audiences know very well (thanks to our Fall 2015 retrospective), Mathieu Amalric is not only an acclaimed actor who has worked with everyone from Arnaud Desplechin, Olivier Assayas, and Alain Resnais to Stephen Spielberg, David Cronenberg, Roman Polanski, Guy Maddin, and Wes Anderson, he is also an extraordinary filmmaker in his own right. His seventh feature-length film as a director is both a heartfelt tribute to the legendary chanteuse Barbara (1930-97), and a vehicle for another peerlessly talented French luminary (and frequent Amalric collaborator), the actress and singer Jeanne Balibar (the subject of her own retrospective co-presented by Anthology and the French Institute Alliance Fran&ccedil;aise; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/49857">here</a> for more details).<br /><br />Amalric&rsquo;s films are remarkable for their intuitive freedom, and their emphasis on emotional textures and states of feeling rather than on straightforward narrative construction or easily grasped meanings. BARBARA is a case in point: eschewing anything like a coherent, birth-to-death account of the events of her life, the film instead orchestrates fragments of the singer&rsquo;s life and performances into a free and quasi-abstract meditation on Barbara&rsquo;s identity and cultural presence. And by casting Balibar not as Barbara per se but more self-referentially as an actress making a film-within-the-film about the singer, his film becomes an even broader investigation into the concept of biographical filmmaking, representation, and identity. It&rsquo;s an experimental biopic in the tradition of Stanley Kwan&rsquo;s CENTER STAGE, Peter Watkins&rsquo;s EDVARD MUNCH, and Paul Leduc&rsquo;s FRIDA, and features a typically riveting, charismatic performance from Balibar (who will be here in person for opening night!).<br /><br />&ldquo;To fans of the mononymous Barbara &ndash; the delicate-voiced, emotionally acute French chanteuse adored by everyone from Jacques Brel to Fran&ccedil;ois Mitterand &ndash; Amalric&rsquo;s mega-meta, dreamily blurred biopic-within-a-film may seem a bemusing tribute to a national icon. To those unfamiliar with the singer and her work, this film is likely to be a more perplexing experience still: an elusive ghost of a celebrity portrait, a meditation on likeness and impersonation in which the subject, the actor and the performance become difficult to prise apart on screen.&rdquo; &ndash;Guy Lodge, THE GUARDIAN<br /><br />Special thanks to Mathilde Rottier (Gaumont).<br /><br /></p> Tuesday, October 16 BARBARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49836 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br /><em><strong>JEANNE BALIBAR IN PERSON ON OPENING NIGHT, FRI, OCT 12, FOR A Q&amp;A FOLLOWING THE 6:45 SHOW AND AN INTRO TO THE 9:15 SCREENING!</strong></em><br /><br />As Anthology audiences know very well (thanks to our Fall 2015 retrospective), Mathieu Amalric is not only an acclaimed actor who has worked with everyone from Arnaud Desplechin, Olivier Assayas, and Alain Resnais to Stephen Spielberg, David Cronenberg, Roman Polanski, Guy Maddin, and Wes Anderson, he is also an extraordinary filmmaker in his own right. His seventh feature-length film as a director is both a heartfelt tribute to the legendary chanteuse Barbara (1930-97), and a vehicle for another peerlessly talented French luminary (and frequent Amalric collaborator), the actress and singer Jeanne Balibar (the subject of her own retrospective co-presented by Anthology and the French Institute Alliance Fran&ccedil;aise; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/49857">here</a> for more details).<br /><br />Amalric&rsquo;s films are remarkable for their intuitive freedom, and their emphasis on emotional textures and states of feeling rather than on straightforward narrative construction or easily grasped meanings. BARBARA is a case in point: eschewing anything like a coherent, birth-to-death account of the events of her life, the film instead orchestrates fragments of the singer&rsquo;s life and performances into a free and quasi-abstract meditation on Barbara&rsquo;s identity and cultural presence. And by casting Balibar not as Barbara per se but more self-referentially as an actress making a film-within-the-film about the singer, his film becomes an even broader investigation into the concept of biographical filmmaking, representation, and identity. It&rsquo;s an experimental biopic in the tradition of Stanley Kwan&rsquo;s CENTER STAGE, Peter Watkins&rsquo;s EDVARD MUNCH, and Paul Leduc&rsquo;s FRIDA, and features a typically riveting, charismatic performance from Balibar (who will be here in person for opening night!).<br /><br />&ldquo;To fans of the mononymous Barbara &ndash; the delicate-voiced, emotionally acute French chanteuse adored by everyone from Jacques Brel to Fran&ccedil;ois Mitterand &ndash; Amalric&rsquo;s mega-meta, dreamily blurred biopic-within-a-film may seem a bemusing tribute to a national icon. To those unfamiliar with the singer and her work, this film is likely to be a more perplexing experience still: an elusive ghost of a celebrity portrait, a meditation on likeness and impersonation in which the subject, the actor and the performance become difficult to prise apart on screen.&rdquo; &ndash;Guy Lodge, THE GUARDIAN<br /><br />Special thanks to Mathilde Rottier (Gaumont).<br /><br /></p> Wednesday, October 17 CLASSICAL PERIOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49853 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Ted Fendt has made a name for himself in recent years thanks to his drily comic, anthropologically sharp short films about the denizens of suburban Philadelphia, as well as his debut feature, SHORT STAY, which beautifully expanded on the qualities of the short films. His second feature, CLASSICAL PERIOD is unmistakably Fendt-ian in its formal precision, its unwavering dedication to the medium of 16mm, and its focus on a cast of characters who are distinctly (and unapologetically) social outsiders. But in other ways it&rsquo;s a significant departure, a proudly unique and daringly structured film with little concern for pleasing its audience (new or established).<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD revolves around a group of men and women &ndash; predominantly Cal, but also Evelyn, Chris, Sam, and Michael &ndash; who hold regular meetings to discuss art, history, and culture, and in particular Henry Longfellow&rsquo;s translation of Dante&rsquo;s &ldquo;Divine Comedy.&rdquo; Most of the film is devoted to these five discussing (and at times monologuing on) their various and invariably freelance readings together, though Fendt devotes a remarkable amount of time as well to documenting the simple, solitary act of reading.<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD is a film whose conception is both bold and astonishingly subtle, and one that functions simultaneously on multiple levels. It&rsquo;s equally attuned to the substance of Cal and company&rsquo;s discussions and to the personalities, neuroses, and unspoken social dynamics bubbling beneath what appears to be an implacably cerebral surface. Though this idea of verbal expression as a tactic of distraction is clearly reminiscent of &Eacute;ric Rohmer, Fendt&rsquo;s approach to framing, editing, and acting style are even more indebted to his mentors, Jean-Marie Straub and Dani&egrave;le Huillet (Fendt edited a volume on Straub/Huillet for the Austrian Film Museum in 2016). As a result, when the emotional and psychological sides of his protagonists&rsquo; lives do breach to the surface, it comes as a shock, a retroactive sign of a dimension that was operating in camouflage all along. CLASSICAL PERIOD finds Fendt further developing his unique cinematic voice &ndash; somehow deadpan funny, genuinely intellectual, and darkly melancholic all at once &ndash; while embracing a new formal and conceptual richness.<br /><br />&ldquo;What are a few references among friends? But for Cal and his circle, it&rsquo;s hardly a few. They barely conduct a single conversation that doesn&rsquo;t revolve around architecture, literature, theology, history. Each set of ideas leads seamlessly into the next, until the flow they form is endless&hellip;. When Cal, Evelyn, Chris et al. exchange all this absurdly specific knowledge, they do so with such earnest relentlessness that it&rsquo;s hard to suppress a smile, although melancholy is never far away.&rdquo; &ndash; James Lattimer, BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;I felt myself at an impasse with the kind of behavioral-composite character studies I had been making. In this film, I have removed narrative and its related trappings to focus solely on people, most notably Cal. The film contains no exposition, which, even if I had barely used it in my previous films, still felt like a hindrance. Here there is simply what the camera presents, projected in the present tense.&rdquo; &ndash;Ted Fendt<br /><br /><br /></p> Wednesday, October 17 CLASSICAL PERIOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49854 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Ted Fendt has made a name for himself in recent years thanks to his drily comic, anthropologically sharp short films about the denizens of suburban Philadelphia, as well as his debut feature, SHORT STAY, which beautifully expanded on the qualities of the short films. His second feature, CLASSICAL PERIOD is unmistakably Fendt-ian in its formal precision, its unwavering dedication to the medium of 16mm, and its focus on a cast of characters who are distinctly (and unapologetically) social outsiders. But in other ways it&rsquo;s a significant departure, a proudly unique and daringly structured film with little concern for pleasing its audience (new or established).<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD revolves around a group of men and women &ndash; predominantly Cal, but also Evelyn, Chris, Sam, and Michael &ndash; who hold regular meetings to discuss art, history, and culture, and in particular Henry Longfellow&rsquo;s translation of Dante&rsquo;s &ldquo;Divine Comedy.&rdquo; Most of the film is devoted to these five discussing (and at times monologuing on) their various and invariably freelance readings together, though Fendt devotes a remarkable amount of time as well to documenting the simple, solitary act of reading.<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD is a film whose conception is both bold and astonishingly subtle, and one that functions simultaneously on multiple levels. It&rsquo;s equally attuned to the substance of Cal and company&rsquo;s discussions and to the personalities, neuroses, and unspoken social dynamics bubbling beneath what appears to be an implacably cerebral surface. Though this idea of verbal expression as a tactic of distraction is clearly reminiscent of &Eacute;ric Rohmer, Fendt&rsquo;s approach to framing, editing, and acting style are even more indebted to his mentors, Jean-Marie Straub and Dani&egrave;le Huillet (Fendt edited a volume on Straub/Huillet for the Austrian Film Museum in 2016). As a result, when the emotional and psychological sides of his protagonists&rsquo; lives do breach to the surface, it comes as a shock, a retroactive sign of a dimension that was operating in camouflage all along. CLASSICAL PERIOD finds Fendt further developing his unique cinematic voice &ndash; somehow deadpan funny, genuinely intellectual, and darkly melancholic all at once &ndash; while embracing a new formal and conceptual richness.<br /><br />&ldquo;What are a few references among friends? But for Cal and his circle, it&rsquo;s hardly a few. They barely conduct a single conversation that doesn&rsquo;t revolve around architecture, literature, theology, history. Each set of ideas leads seamlessly into the next, until the flow they form is endless&hellip;. When Cal, Evelyn, Chris et al. exchange all this absurdly specific knowledge, they do so with such earnest relentlessness that it&rsquo;s hard to suppress a smile, although melancholy is never far away.&rdquo; &ndash; James Lattimer, BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;I felt myself at an impasse with the kind of behavioral-composite character studies I had been making. In this film, I have removed narrative and its related trappings to focus solely on people, most notably Cal. The film contains no exposition, which, even if I had barely used it in my previous films, still felt like a hindrance. Here there is simply what the camera presents, projected in the present tense.&rdquo; &ndash;Ted Fendt<br /><br /><br /></p> Wednesday, October 17 BARBARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49837 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br /><em><strong>JEANNE BALIBAR IN PERSON ON OPENING NIGHT, FRI, OCT 12, FOR A Q&amp;A FOLLOWING THE 6:45 SHOW AND AN INTRO TO THE 9:15 SCREENING!</strong></em><br /><br />As Anthology audiences know very well (thanks to our Fall 2015 retrospective), Mathieu Amalric is not only an acclaimed actor who has worked with everyone from Arnaud Desplechin, Olivier Assayas, and Alain Resnais to Stephen Spielberg, David Cronenberg, Roman Polanski, Guy Maddin, and Wes Anderson, he is also an extraordinary filmmaker in his own right. His seventh feature-length film as a director is both a heartfelt tribute to the legendary chanteuse Barbara (1930-97), and a vehicle for another peerlessly talented French luminary (and frequent Amalric collaborator), the actress and singer Jeanne Balibar (the subject of her own retrospective co-presented by Anthology and the French Institute Alliance Fran&ccedil;aise; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/49857">here</a> for more details).<br /><br />Amalric&rsquo;s films are remarkable for their intuitive freedom, and their emphasis on emotional textures and states of feeling rather than on straightforward narrative construction or easily grasped meanings. BARBARA is a case in point: eschewing anything like a coherent, birth-to-death account of the events of her life, the film instead orchestrates fragments of the singer&rsquo;s life and performances into a free and quasi-abstract meditation on Barbara&rsquo;s identity and cultural presence. And by casting Balibar not as Barbara per se but more self-referentially as an actress making a film-within-the-film about the singer, his film becomes an even broader investigation into the concept of biographical filmmaking, representation, and identity. It&rsquo;s an experimental biopic in the tradition of Stanley Kwan&rsquo;s CENTER STAGE, Peter Watkins&rsquo;s EDVARD MUNCH, and Paul Leduc&rsquo;s FRIDA, and features a typically riveting, charismatic performance from Balibar (who will be here in person for opening night!).<br /><br />&ldquo;To fans of the mononymous Barbara &ndash; the delicate-voiced, emotionally acute French chanteuse adored by everyone from Jacques Brel to Fran&ccedil;ois Mitterand &ndash; Amalric&rsquo;s mega-meta, dreamily blurred biopic-within-a-film may seem a bemusing tribute to a national icon. To those unfamiliar with the singer and her work, this film is likely to be a more perplexing experience still: an elusive ghost of a celebrity portrait, a meditation on likeness and impersonation in which the subject, the actor and the performance become difficult to prise apart on screen.&rdquo; &ndash;Guy Lodge, THE GUARDIAN<br /><br />Special thanks to Mathilde Rottier (Gaumont).<br /><br /></p> Wednesday, October 17 BARBARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49838 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br /><em><strong>JEANNE BALIBAR IN PERSON ON OPENING NIGHT, FRI, OCT 12, FOR A Q&amp;A FOLLOWING THE 6:45 SHOW AND AN INTRO TO THE 9:15 SCREENING!</strong></em><br /><br />As Anthology audiences know very well (thanks to our Fall 2015 retrospective), Mathieu Amalric is not only an acclaimed actor who has worked with everyone from Arnaud Desplechin, Olivier Assayas, and Alain Resnais to Stephen Spielberg, David Cronenberg, Roman Polanski, Guy Maddin, and Wes Anderson, he is also an extraordinary filmmaker in his own right. His seventh feature-length film as a director is both a heartfelt tribute to the legendary chanteuse Barbara (1930-97), and a vehicle for another peerlessly talented French luminary (and frequent Amalric collaborator), the actress and singer Jeanne Balibar (the subject of her own retrospective co-presented by Anthology and the French Institute Alliance Fran&ccedil;aise; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/49857">here</a> for more details).<br /><br />Amalric&rsquo;s films are remarkable for their intuitive freedom, and their emphasis on emotional textures and states of feeling rather than on straightforward narrative construction or easily grasped meanings. BARBARA is a case in point: eschewing anything like a coherent, birth-to-death account of the events of her life, the film instead orchestrates fragments of the singer&rsquo;s life and performances into a free and quasi-abstract meditation on Barbara&rsquo;s identity and cultural presence. And by casting Balibar not as Barbara per se but more self-referentially as an actress making a film-within-the-film about the singer, his film becomes an even broader investigation into the concept of biographical filmmaking, representation, and identity. It&rsquo;s an experimental biopic in the tradition of Stanley Kwan&rsquo;s CENTER STAGE, Peter Watkins&rsquo;s EDVARD MUNCH, and Paul Leduc&rsquo;s FRIDA, and features a typically riveting, charismatic performance from Balibar (who will be here in person for opening night!).<br /><br />&ldquo;To fans of the mononymous Barbara &ndash; the delicate-voiced, emotionally acute French chanteuse adored by everyone from Jacques Brel to Fran&ccedil;ois Mitterand &ndash; Amalric&rsquo;s mega-meta, dreamily blurred biopic-within-a-film may seem a bemusing tribute to a national icon. To those unfamiliar with the singer and her work, this film is likely to be a more perplexing experience still: an elusive ghost of a celebrity portrait, a meditation on likeness and impersonation in which the subject, the actor and the performance become difficult to prise apart on screen.&rdquo; &ndash;Guy Lodge, THE GUARDIAN<br /><br />Special thanks to Mathilde Rottier (Gaumont).<br /><br /></p> Thursday, October 18 CLASSICAL PERIOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49855 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Ted Fendt has made a name for himself in recent years thanks to his drily comic, anthropologically sharp short films about the denizens of suburban Philadelphia, as well as his debut feature, SHORT STAY, which beautifully expanded on the qualities of the short films. His second feature, CLASSICAL PERIOD is unmistakably Fendt-ian in its formal precision, its unwavering dedication to the medium of 16mm, and its focus on a cast of characters who are distinctly (and unapologetically) social outsiders. But in other ways it&rsquo;s a significant departure, a proudly unique and daringly structured film with little concern for pleasing its audience (new or established).<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD revolves around a group of men and women &ndash; predominantly Cal, but also Evelyn, Chris, Sam, and Michael &ndash; who hold regular meetings to discuss art, history, and culture, and in particular Henry Longfellow&rsquo;s translation of Dante&rsquo;s &ldquo;Divine Comedy.&rdquo; Most of the film is devoted to these five discussing (and at times monologuing on) their various and invariably freelance readings together, though Fendt devotes a remarkable amount of time as well to documenting the simple, solitary act of reading.<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD is a film whose conception is both bold and astonishingly subtle, and one that functions simultaneously on multiple levels. It&rsquo;s equally attuned to the substance of Cal and company&rsquo;s discussions and to the personalities, neuroses, and unspoken social dynamics bubbling beneath what appears to be an implacably cerebral surface. Though this idea of verbal expression as a tactic of distraction is clearly reminiscent of &Eacute;ric Rohmer, Fendt&rsquo;s approach to framing, editing, and acting style are even more indebted to his mentors, Jean-Marie Straub and Dani&egrave;le Huillet (Fendt edited a volume on Straub/Huillet for the Austrian Film Museum in 2016). As a result, when the emotional and psychological sides of his protagonists&rsquo; lives do breach to the surface, it comes as a shock, a retroactive sign of a dimension that was operating in camouflage all along. CLASSICAL PERIOD finds Fendt further developing his unique cinematic voice &ndash; somehow deadpan funny, genuinely intellectual, and darkly melancholic all at once &ndash; while embracing a new formal and conceptual richness.<br /><br />&ldquo;What are a few references among friends? But for Cal and his circle, it&rsquo;s hardly a few. They barely conduct a single conversation that doesn&rsquo;t revolve around architecture, literature, theology, history. Each set of ideas leads seamlessly into the next, until the flow they form is endless&hellip;. When Cal, Evelyn, Chris et al. exchange all this absurdly specific knowledge, they do so with such earnest relentlessness that it&rsquo;s hard to suppress a smile, although melancholy is never far away.&rdquo; &ndash; James Lattimer, BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;I felt myself at an impasse with the kind of behavioral-composite character studies I had been making. In this film, I have removed narrative and its related trappings to focus solely on people, most notably Cal. The film contains no exposition, which, even if I had barely used it in my previous films, still felt like a hindrance. Here there is simply what the camera presents, projected in the present tense.&rdquo; &ndash;Ted Fendt<br /><br /><br /></p> Thursday, October 18 CLASSICAL PERIOD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49856 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Ted Fendt has made a name for himself in recent years thanks to his drily comic, anthropologically sharp short films about the denizens of suburban Philadelphia, as well as his debut feature, SHORT STAY, which beautifully expanded on the qualities of the short films. His second feature, CLASSICAL PERIOD is unmistakably Fendt-ian in its formal precision, its unwavering dedication to the medium of 16mm, and its focus on a cast of characters who are distinctly (and unapologetically) social outsiders. But in other ways it&rsquo;s a significant departure, a proudly unique and daringly structured film with little concern for pleasing its audience (new or established).<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD revolves around a group of men and women &ndash; predominantly Cal, but also Evelyn, Chris, Sam, and Michael &ndash; who hold regular meetings to discuss art, history, and culture, and in particular Henry Longfellow&rsquo;s translation of Dante&rsquo;s &ldquo;Divine Comedy.&rdquo; Most of the film is devoted to these five discussing (and at times monologuing on) their various and invariably freelance readings together, though Fendt devotes a remarkable amount of time as well to documenting the simple, solitary act of reading.<br /><br />CLASSICAL PERIOD is a film whose conception is both bold and astonishingly subtle, and one that functions simultaneously on multiple levels. It&rsquo;s equally attuned to the substance of Cal and company&rsquo;s discussions and to the personalities, neuroses, and unspoken social dynamics bubbling beneath what appears to be an implacably cerebral surface. Though this idea of verbal expression as a tactic of distraction is clearly reminiscent of &Eacute;ric Rohmer, Fendt&rsquo;s approach to framing, editing, and acting style are even more indebted to his mentors, Jean-Marie Straub and Dani&egrave;le Huillet (Fendt edited a volume on Straub/Huillet for the Austrian Film Museum in 2016). As a result, when the emotional and psychological sides of his protagonists&rsquo; lives do breach to the surface, it comes as a shock, a retroactive sign of a dimension that was operating in camouflage all along. CLASSICAL PERIOD finds Fendt further developing his unique cinematic voice &ndash; somehow deadpan funny, genuinely intellectual, and darkly melancholic all at once &ndash; while embracing a new formal and conceptual richness.<br /><br />&ldquo;What are a few references among friends? But for Cal and his circle, it&rsquo;s hardly a few. They barely conduct a single conversation that doesn&rsquo;t revolve around architecture, literature, theology, history. Each set of ideas leads seamlessly into the next, until the flow they form is endless&hellip;. When Cal, Evelyn, Chris et al. exchange all this absurdly specific knowledge, they do so with such earnest relentlessness that it&rsquo;s hard to suppress a smile, although melancholy is never far away.&rdquo; &ndash; James Lattimer, BERLINALE<br /><br />&ldquo;I felt myself at an impasse with the kind of behavioral-composite character studies I had been making. In this film, I have removed narrative and its related trappings to focus solely on people, most notably Cal. The film contains no exposition, which, even if I had barely used it in my previous films, still felt like a hindrance. Here there is simply what the camera presents, projected in the present tense.&rdquo; &ndash;Ted Fendt<br /><br /><br /></p> Thursday, October 18 BARBARA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49839 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN!<br /><br /><em><strong>JEANNE BALIBAR IN PERSON ON OPENING NIGHT, FRI, OCT 12, FOR A Q&amp;A FOLLOWING THE 6:45 SHOW AND AN INTRO TO THE 9:15 SCREENING!</strong></em><br /><br />As Anthology audiences know very well (thanks to our Fall 2015 retrospective), Mathieu Amalric is not only an acclaimed actor who has worked with everyone from Arnaud Desplechin, Olivier Assayas, and Alain Resnais to Stephen Spielberg, David Cronenberg, Roman Polanski, Guy Maddin, and Wes Anderson, he is also an extraordinary filmmaker in his own right. His seventh feature-length film as a director is both a heartfelt tribute to the legendary chanteuse Barbara (1930-97), and a vehicle for another peerlessly talented French luminary (and frequent Amalric collaborator), the actress and singer Jeanne Balibar (the subject of her own retrospective co-presented by Anthology and the French Institute Alliance Fran&ccedil;aise; click <a href="../../../film_screenings/series/49857">here</a> for more details).<br /><br />Amalric&rsquo;s films are remarkable for their intuitive freedom, and their emphasis on emotional textures and states of feeling rather than on straightforward narrative construction or easily grasped meanings. BARBARA is a case in point: eschewing anything like a coherent, birth-to-death account of the events of her life, the film instead orchestrates fragments of the singer&rsquo;s life and performances into a free and quasi-abstract meditation on Barbara&rsquo;s identity and cultural presence. And by casting Balibar not as Barbara per se but more self-referentially as an actress making a film-within-the-film about the singer, his film becomes an even broader investigation into the concept of biographical filmmaking, representation, and identity. It&rsquo;s an experimental biopic in the tradition of Stanley Kwan&rsquo;s CENTER STAGE, Peter Watkins&rsquo;s EDVARD MUNCH, and Paul Leduc&rsquo;s FRIDA, and features a typically riveting, charismatic performance from Balibar (who will be here in person for opening night!).<br /><br />&ldquo;To fans of the mononymous Barbara &ndash; the delicate-voiced, emotionally acute French chanteuse adored by everyone from Jacques Brel to Fran&ccedil;ois Mitterand &ndash; Amalric&rsquo;s mega-meta, dreamily blurred biopic-within-a-film may seem a bemusing tribute to a national icon. To those unfamiliar with the singer and her work, this film is likely to be a more perplexing experience still: an elusive ghost of a celebrity portrait, a meditation on likeness and impersonation in which the subject, the actor and the performance become difficult to prise apart on screen.&rdquo; &ndash;Guy Lodge, THE GUARDIAN<br /><br />Special thanks to Mathilde Rottier (Gaumont).<br /><br /></p> Thursday, October 18 RUSTLERS / CUATREROS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49894 <p><em><strong>FILMMAKER IN PERSON!</strong></em><br /><br />Inspired by the first book written by her father, sociologist Roberto Carri, acclaimed filmmaker Albertina Carri (LOS RUBIOS) travels to northern Argentina, following in the footsteps of Isidro Vel&aacute;zquez. The country&rsquo;s last cuatrero or rustler, Vel&aacute;zquez was accused of stealing cattle and shot dead by police in 1967. Constructing the narrative through archival footage, home videos, ads, movies, and interviews, and framing it with the search for a lost film based on her father&rsquo;s book, Carri&rsquo;s visually vibrant documentary &ndash; a favorite at the Berlin and Mar del Plata film festivals &ndash; tells a story full of legends, families, politics, and cinema.<br /><br /></p> Friday, October 19 TAIWAN, PROG. 1: RICHARD YAO-CHI CHEN’S STUDENT FILMS, 1963-66 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49914 <p>Born in Sichuan, China, in 1938, Richard Yao-chi Chen moved to Taiwan in 1945 where he studied architecture before relocating to the U.S. He attended the Chicago Art Institute, received his MA in film studies from UCLA in 1967, and then returned to Taiwan to embark on a successful filmmaking career in the Chinese-speaking world. This program features four films Chen made while studying at UCLA. THE ARCHER is a hand-drawn animation of the Chinese folktale &ldquo;Houyi Shoots Down the Suns.&rdquo; THROUGH THE YEARS touches on the theme of Westward expansion by combining facts with fiction. A film about three college students, THE MOUNTAIN employs a modernist narrative to reflect young people&rsquo;s longing for freedom in the 1960s. The original copy of this short lay forgotten in a UCLA professor&rsquo;s garage for decades and was digitally restored by the Taiwan Film Institute in 2017. LIU PI-CHIA, a biographical documentary depicting the life of a veteran who joined tens of thousands of others to work on national infrastructure construction projects in the 1960s, is considered Taiwan&rsquo;s first cin&eacute;ma v&eacute;rit&eacute; film.<br /><br />Richard Yao-chi Chen THE ARCHER (1963, 5 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />Richard Yao-chi Chen THROUGH THE YEARS (1966, 11 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />Richard Yao-chi Chen THE MOUNTAIN (1966, 19 min, 16mm-to-digital. In Chinese with English subtitles.)<br />Richard Yao-chi Chen LIU PI-CHIA (1967, 27 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.<br /><br /></p> Friday, October 19 TAIWAN, PROG. 2: EXPERIMENTAL SHORTS FROM THE 1960s http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49916 <p>This program includes five films by artists who were indirectly involved in the 1960s artistic experiments. Theatre Quarterly not only delivered the latest news regarding the Western art world, but also functioned as a platform for artists to present their new creations. Macao-born, Hong Kong-based film critic Law Kar and Hong Kong&rsquo;s renowned writer Xi Xi both served briefly as editor of Theatre Quarterly in the 1960s, in addition to making experimental films. Tom Davenport, an American independent filmmaker, spent years studying the Chinese language and culture in Taiwan, and was commissioned by National Geographic to film there. This program includes his first documentary, T&rsquo;AI CHI CH&rsquo;UAN, in which he filmed the philosopher Nan Huai-chin practicing Tai-chi on Taiwan&rsquo;s northeastern coast. The last two shorts provide an indirect view of the artistic achievements of Huang Hua-cheng, a pivotal figure who co-founded Theatre Quarterly and spearheaded the 1960s experimental movement in theater, film, and visual art. As none of Huang&rsquo;s video works have survived, the video documentation of the 1994 seminar &ldquo;Theatre Quarterly and I,&rdquo; in which Huang played his 1967 film EXPERIMENT 002 in the original 8mm format, provides a glimpse of his own work, while THE PROPHET is a recent video remake of Huang&rsquo;s first experimental theater piece by artist Su Yu-hsien (born 1982).<br /><br />Law Kar ROUTINE (Hong Kong) (1969, 19 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />Xi Xi THE MILKY WAY (Hong Kong) (1968, 2 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />Tom Davenport T&rsquo;AI CHI CH&rsquo;UAN (USA) (1969, 10 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />EXPERIMENT 002 (1994, 39 min, VHS-to-digital)<br />Su Yu-hsien THE PROPHET (2016, 20 min, DCP. In Chinese with English subtitles. This film was originally created as a two-channel video installation, but is presented here as a single-channel video.)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.<br /><br /></p> Saturday, October 20 SALTIMBANK http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49878 <p>The Saltim Brothers: younger Fr&eacute;d&eacute;ric runs the family bank, while older brother Bruno turned down the executive position in exchange for financing a theater. Between them and among them, various characters navigate. The brothers each try to control their elegant niece Vanessa&rsquo;s future. Caf&eacute; owners Eve and Jim complicate matters with their lies and betrayals, and a strange exiled stage director arrives. The lack of money reveals everyone&rsquo;s true colors on- and offstage.<br /><br />&ldquo;Biette displays a confidence with his extremely relaxed style, so that SALTIMBANK easily meanders off in unexpected directions. It is at its slyest as an elaborate playing out of the theme that everyone is playing a role, whether it&rsquo;s in a corporate bank, at a family gathering or on the proscenium.&rdquo; &ndash;Robert Koehler, VARIETY<br /><br /></p> Saturday, October 20 TAIWAN, PROG. 3: I DIDN’T DARE TO TELL YOU http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49918 <p>Mou Tun-fei<br />I DIDN&rsquo;T DARE TO TELL YOU<br />1969, 78 min, 35mm-to-digital. In Chinese with English subtitles.<br />Born in China in 1941, Mou Tun-fei moved to Taiwan in 1949. He declared that cinema would be his lifework while he was still an art school student. I DIDN&rsquo;T DARE TO TELL YOU and THE END OF THE TRACK, both included in this series, are the only two feature-length films he made in Taiwan and are among the nation&rsquo;s first independent titles. Both films went unreleased, for unknown reasons, though rumor has it that the realistic depiction of a stifling society in I DIDN&rsquo;T DARE TO TELL YOU and the hint of homosexuality in THE END OF THE TRACK could be to blame. Discouraged, Mou spent the following years traveling in Europe and South America before working in Hong Kong for Shaw Brothers Pictures, where he became known for making gory genre films.<br /><br />In I DIDN&rsquo;T DARE TO TELL YOU, a primary school student secretly works a night job to pay off his father&rsquo;s gambling debts, and as a result constantly dozes off during his daytime classes. When the teacher investigates, a series of family disputes ensues. Though only a small number of people saw the film at private screenings upon its completion, its realistic style has nevertheless proven influential. One reel of the film remains lost, and the only available copy has an abrupt, inconsistent ending that was most likely imposed by the government for propagandistic purposes.<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />Richard Yao-chi Chen THE MOUNTAIN (1966, 19 min, 16mm-to-digital. In Chinese with English subtitles.)<br /><br /></p> Saturday, October 20 WIMBLEDON STADIUM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49867 <p>(LE STADE DE WIMBLEDON)<br /><br />Mathieu Amalric&rsquo;s second feature film as a director, WIMBLEDON STADIUM made it abundantly clear that he had a cinematic voice and sensibility all his own, not to mention a remarkable openness to experimentation and improvisation. Adapting a novel by Daniele del Giudice, Amalric dispensed with a script, working directly from the book and choosing not to prepare his actors beforehand. WIMBLEDON STADIUM charts a young French woman&rsquo;s fascination with deceased Italian intellectual Bobby Vohler, and her quest to research his life. Scouring libraries and bookstores and interviewing those who knew him, in both Trieste and ultimately in England, she attempts to penetrate the mystery of why this renowned editor, who influenced many writers, never published writing of his own. Featuring a subtle, compelling performance by Balibar, WIMBLEDON STADIUM is a rich and searching reflection on creativity, meaning, and the mystery of personality.<br /><br /></p> Saturday, October 20 VA SAVOIR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49870 <p>This late masterpiece by Jacques Rivette is a typically open-form, multi-layered, and thrillingly meandering meditation on theater, acting, and the windings of narrative as a means of exploring the mysteries of human behavior and psychology. Balibar stars as Camille, a French actress relocated to Italy, who returns to Paris with her theater-director partner Ugo (Sergio Castellitto) to perform in a production of Pirandello&rsquo;s &ldquo;As You Desire Me.&rdquo; Dreading the prospect of seeing her ex-lover Pierre, a philosophy teacher, she nevertheless goes in search of him. Meanwhile Ugo embarks on his own search, for a manuscript by Carlo Goldoni, a quest that will bring him into contact with the disturbing Dominique. By night, Ugo and Camille work on the performance, by day they go their separate ways to pursue their individual quests.<br /><br /></p> Sunday, October 21 TAIWAN, PROG. 4: THE END OF THE TRACK http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49920 <p>Mou Tun-fei<br />THE END OF THE TRACK<br />1970, 91 min, 35mm-to-digital. In Chinese with English subtitles.<br />Tong and Yong-sheng are inseparable playmates, but when Yong-sheng dies in a track training accident with Tong present, Tong feels heartbroken and guilt-ridden. Burdened by solitude after losing his best friend, Tong falls into a dark spiral. At the time, this film was banned due to its homosexual overtones. Some felt that certain segments drew comparison with the short story THE NOODLE STALL by Chen Ying-zhen, a key figure of Taiwan&rsquo;s 1960s literary movement who was imprisoned twice for &ldquo;subversive activity.&rdquo;<br /><br /></p> Sunday, October 21 TAIWAN, PROG. 5: EXPERIMENTAL SHORTS FROM THE 1960s http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49922 <p>This program presents films by five key figures, including filmmaker Pai Ching-jui (1931-97), painter Han Hsiang-ning (born 1939), photographers Chuang Ling and Chang Chao-tang, and designer Long Sih-liang (1937-2012). While the movement was short-lived these filmmakers went on to become well-established artists in their own disciplines. Pai, the first person from Taiwan to study film in Italy, built his reputation making classic melodramas and literary adaptations. Han, still active today, is a noted painter, while Chuang and Chang are two highly respected photographers in Taiwan, and Long created many memorable visual designs for films and books.<br /><br />The works in this program were either made as silent films or suffered damage to their soundtracks. <em><strong>This screening will be accompanied by a live musical performance by sound artist C. Spencer Yeh, along with Brandon Lopez and Lucie V&iacute;tkov&aacute;.</strong></em><br /><br />Pai Ching-jui A MORNING IN TAIPEI (1964, 20 min, 35mm-to-digital)<br />Han Hsiang-ning TODAY (1965, 4 min, 8mm-to digital)<br />Han Hsiang-ning RUN (1966, 5 min, 8mm)<br />Chuang Ling LIFE CONTINUED (1966, 14 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />Chuang Ling MY NEW BORN BABY (1967, 8 min, 16mm-to-digital)<br />Chang Chao-tang MODERN POETRY EXHIBITION/1966 (1966, 12 min, 8mm-to-digital)<br />Long Sih-liang GETTING READY FOR THE FESTIVAL (1967, 8 min, 8mm-to-digital)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.<br /><br /></p> Sunday, October 21 NE CHANGE RIEN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49861 <p>Pedro Costa&rsquo;s documentary portrait of Jeanne Balibar, NE CHANGE RIEN includes footage of Balibar in concert, but above all it documents the demanding, painstaking, and repetitive process of rehearsing and recording an album. It is a close cousin to Costa&rsquo;s earlier essay on the process of creation, WHERE DOES YOUR HIDDEN SMILE LIE?, a documentary on the filmmakers Jean-Marie Straub and Dani&egrave;le Huillet. And like the earlier film, it is a ravishing demonstration of Costa&rsquo;s alchemical genius, his unparalleled mastery of digital video and his uncanny ability to create works of incredible visual richness with seemingly scanty means. Though much of NE CHANGE RIEN is confined to Balibar&rsquo;s recording studio, in Costa&rsquo;s hands this nondescript space is transformed into a variety of gorgeous configurations of light, shadow, and volume, while the arduous process of recording becomes deeply compelling and almost monumental in its repetition.<br /><br /></p> Sunday, October 21 EC: HUGO / JACOBS / LEVITT / MAAS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49822 <p>Ian Hugo<br />BELLS OF ATLANTIS<br />(1952, 10 min, 16mm. Preserved by the Library of Congress through the Avant-Garde Masters program funded by The Film Foundation and administered by the National Film Preservation Foundation.)<br />A film poem, based on Ana&iuml;s Nin&rsquo;s HOUSE OF INCEST, narrated by and featuring Nin.<br />&ldquo;[BELLS OF ATLANTIS was] inspired by the prologue to my HOUSE OF INCEST and the line: &lsquo;I remember my first birth in water.&rsquo; The film evoked the watery depths of the lost continent of Atlantis. It is a lyrical journey into prenatal memories, the theme of birth and rebirth from the sea.&rdquo; &ndash;Ana&iuml;s Nin<br /><br />Ken Jacobs<br />LITTLE STABS AT HAPPINESS (1959-63, 18 min, 16mm. With Jack Smith.)<br />&ldquo;Material was cut in as it came out of the camera, embarrassing moments intact. 100&rsquo; rolls timed well with music on old 78s. I was interested in immediacy, a sense of ease, and an art where suffering was acknowledged but not trivialized with dramatics. Whimsy was our achievement, as well as breaking out of step.&rdquo; &ndash;Ken Jacobs<br /><br />Helen Levitt, Janice Loeb, and James Agee<br />IN THE STREET (1952, 12 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />&ldquo;Informality is indeed the crucial and virtually definitive quality of IN THE STREET; it is even the guiding principle and vision. [&hellip;] This is the extreme realization of a classic &lsquo;naturalistic&rsquo; genre, the German &lsquo;street film,&rsquo; where the street was imaged as the arena of the everyday and random, the channel in which the &lsquo;stream of life&rsquo; conveniently became microcosmic.&rdquo; &ndash;Ken Kelman, THE ESSENTIAL CINEMA<br /><br />Willard Maas<br />GEOGRAPHY OF THE BODY (1943, 7 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. Preserved by Anthology with support from The National Film Preservation Foundation.)<br />&ldquo;The terrors and splendors of the human body as the undiscovered, mysterious continent.&rdquo; &ndash;Willard Maas<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 55 min.</p> Monday, October 22 VA SAVOIR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49871 <p>This late masterpiece by Jacques Rivette is a typically open-form, multi-layered, and thrillingly meandering meditation on theater, acting, and the windings of narrative as a means of exploring the mysteries of human behavior and psychology. Balibar stars as Camille, a French actress relocated to Italy, who returns to Paris with her theater-director partner Ugo (Sergio Castellitto) to perform in a production of Pirandello&rsquo;s &ldquo;As You Desire Me.&rdquo; Dreading the prospect of seeing her ex-lover Pierre, a philosophy teacher, she nevertheless goes in search of him. Meanwhile Ugo embarks on his own search, for a manuscript by Carlo Goldoni, a quest that will bring him into contact with the disturbing Dominique. By night, Ugo and Camille work on the performance, by day they go their separate ways to pursue their individual quests.<br /><br /></p> Monday, October 22 NYWIFT: Short Films http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49902 <p>Molly McGaughey (Director), Cait Cortelyou (Writer/NYWIFT Member), Monique Hazeur (Writer/Art Director/NYWIFT Member), Katrina Medoff (Actor/Producer/NYWIFT Member) &amp; Irina Chernikina (Editor/NYWIFT Member)<br />THAT VERY EVENING<br />2018, 7 min, digital<br />When a private detective receives a mysterious ticket in the mail, she can&rsquo;t help but investigate. A strange young woman says she&rsquo;s being watched, so the detective follows the lead &ndash; but not everything is as it appears.<br /><br />Daniel Ferry (Director) &amp; Marzy Hart (Actor/Producer/NYWIFT Member)<br />SLICE<br />2015, 18 min, digital<br />Lily Drover led a typical city-dweller&rsquo;s life until she found her newest obsession: murder. Desperate to escape her mundane day-to-day life, she begins luring in the unsuspecting in a twisted, murderous spree to satisfy her dark desires.<br /><br />Geoffrey Guerrero (Director), Courtney J. Camerota (Writer/Producer/NYWIFT Member), Tanya Perez (Supporting Actor/NYWIFT Member), Kym Lukacs (Production Sound Mixer/NYWIFT Member) &amp; Julia Parrott (Editor/NYWIFT Member)<br />PREREQUISITE<br />2017, 11 min, digital<br />A preppy college graduate gets more than she bargained for when she takes a risky second job to offset her student loan debt.<br /><br />Caralene Robinson (Director/Writer/Producer/NYWIFT Member)<br />THE BILL<br />2017, 10 min, digital<br />Lena and ten other women could not be more excited to celebrate Barbie&rsquo;s 35th birthday. When an unexpectedly huge bill arrives, the happy birthday dissolves into drama.<br /><br />Maria Bunai (Director/NYWIFT Member) &amp; Tracy Daniels (Producer/NYWIFT Member)<br />AFTER WORDS: THE OPPOSITE OF FOREPLAY<br />2016, 12 min, digital<br />In this humorous take on the path to true love, Claire pursues a lasting relationship with a range of partners from charming to annoying to questionable.<br /><br />Tricia Paoluccio (Creator/Producer/Actor/NYWIFT Member), Kate Phelan (Director/NYWIFT Member) &amp; Jeanine Bartel (Actor/NYWIFT Member)<br />MOMMY BLOGGER<br />2018, 13 min, digital<br />NYC housewife Addie wants to conquer the lucrative world of mommy blogs and become a celebrity, so she pressures her husband to quit his job to devote himself to their family culture and the making of videos.<br /><br />Shaina Feinberg (Director) &amp; Liz Samuel (Writer/Producer/Actor/NYWIFT Member)<br />MOMTRESS<br />2016, 12 min, digital<br />A short film/pilot about a suburban mom juggling parenting and an acting career while also dealing with aging and loss.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 90 min.<br /><br /></p> Tuesday, October 23 AFA MEMBERS ONLY: 30TH ANNIVERSARY IN THE 2ND AVENUE COURTHOUSE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49900 <p>AFA MEMBERS ONLY &ndash; <em><strong>FREE SCREENING!</strong></em><br />30TH ANNIVERSARY IN THE SECOND AVENUE COURTHOUSE<br />Once every calendar we offer a special, AFA Members-Only screening, featuring sneak-previews of upcoming features, programs of rare materials from Anthology&rsquo;s collections, in-person filmmaker presentations, and more! The benefits of an Anthology membership have always been plentiful: free admission to over 100 Essential Cinema programs, reduced admission to all other shows, discounted AFA publications. But with these screenings &ndash; free and open only to members &ndash; we sweeten the pot even further.<br /><br />This fall&rsquo;s screening celebrates 30 years of Anthology Film Archives at the Second Avenue Courthouse building. Founded in 1970, AFA first opened at the Joseph Papp Public Theater, and later moved to a space in George Maciunas&rsquo;s Fluxhouse at 80 Wooster. But true stability only came with the acquisition in 1979 of the historic Second Avenue Courthouse. After nearly a decade of fundraising and renovation, we re-opened, in a re-conceived and much-expanded form, on October 12, 1988.<br /><br />To celebrate this milestone, we will be screening Robert Frank&rsquo;s C&rsquo;EST VRAI (ONE HOUR), an unedited, real-time exploration of the East Village in 1990. Combining non-fiction documentation of the neighborhood and its denizens with staged encounters, the film includes a glimpse of the then-brand-new Anthology as well as appearances from local luminaries such as Taylor Mead, Bill Rice, Tom Jarmusch, and others. We&rsquo;ll supplement Frank&rsquo;s piece with &ldquo;Strange to Meet You,&rdquo; the first of Jim Jarmusch&rsquo;s COFFEE AND CIGARETTES shorts, filmed in the upstairs lobby, as well as an excerpt from Jonas Mekas&rsquo;s recent diary-film portrait of the architect responsible for the Courthouse renovation, SCENES FROM THE LIFE OF RAIMUND ABRAHAM (2014), which opens with an unforgettable record of the feverish hours leading up to our official re-opening. Join us for this tribute to our home of three decades, as we prepare for the first major renovation to the building since 1988!<br /><br />Special thanks to Chris Chouinard (Park Circus) and Marian Luntz (Museum of Fine Arts Houston).<br /><br />Become a member at our box office, or at <a href="../../../support/membership">anthologyfilmarchives.org</a><br /><br />Robert Frank<br />C&rsquo;EST VRAI (ONE HOUR)<br />1990, 60 min, video. &copy; Robert Frank, 1990, distributed by The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.<br /><br />Preceded by:<br />Jim Jarmusch COFFEE AND CIGARETTES: STRANGE TO MEET YOU (1986, 5 min, 35mm. With Roberto Benigni and Steven Wright.)<br /><br />Jonas SCENES FROM THE LIFE OF RAIMUND ABRAHAM (2014, ca. 6 min-excerpt, digital)<br /><br /><strong>Screening at 7:30. Reception at 7:00!</strong><br /><br /></p> Tuesday, October 23 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49943 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, October 24 SHOW & TELL: Rainer Kohlberger http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49907 <p>Though Austrian-bred, Berlin-based artist Rainer Kohlberger has been active only for the past decade, his work is so assured, perceptually challenging, and visually overwhelming that he&rsquo;s become one of the leading lights of the new generation of experimental moving-image artists. Working, for the most part, in an abstract, graphically complex idiom that calls to mind filmmakers such as John &amp; James Whitney, Paul Sharits, Tony Conrad, and Lillian Schwartz, Kohlberger&rsquo;s practice is based on algorithmically generated graphics, and takes the form of films, videos, live performances, installations, and mobile apps. The films and videos featured here transform the screen into a vertiginously dynamic field of motion, shifting luminosity, phantom depth effects, and other perceptual transformations that animate and activate the mind in truly radical ways. The centerpiece of this program (for which Anthology has acquired its first 21st-century 3D system!) is Kohlberger&rsquo;s brand-new work, MORE THAN EVERYTHING, a masterpiece that utilizes 3D technology not simply to create the illusion of depth but to completely recalibrate the relationship between the image on the screen and the viewer&rsquo;s mental processes &ndash; it&rsquo;s a film in which simply shifting one&rsquo;s eyes to a different section of the frame results in dizzying transformations of the perceived image. Each of Kohlberger&rsquo;s films represent similarly uncharted adventures in perception.<br /><br />&ldquo;Visually my film and installation works can be understood as pure light, created by algorithms out of &lsquo;nothing.&rsquo; Broadly speaking, quantum field theory tells us that all material is vibrating and the differentiation between light and material is in flux. In cinemas today, almost all signs of the old understanding that the materiality of 35mm film stands for is gone. But there are still 24 images per second that touch us like a ghost. Although purely digital, [films such as] &lsquo;not even nothing can be free of ghosts&rsquo; [are] quite materialistic in the sense that our brains are altered by stroboscopic effects, therefore every spectator is completing the film individually in between the senses and their brain. [&hellip;] In an historical context, my work is bound to drone music, a centuries old cultural technique of sustaining sounds for very long periods and providing an idea of the infinite. A music that has always been there, and will go on forever.&rdquo; &ndash;Rainer Kohlberger<br /><br />Presented with support from the Austrian Cultural Forum New York; special thanks to Christian Ebner, Arianna Fleur Kronreif &amp; Nadja Weidmann.<br /><br />WHITE LIGHT/WHITE HEAT 2011, 6.5 min, digital. Made in collaboration with Wilm Thoben.<br />HUMMING, FAST AND SLOW 2013, 9 min, digital<br />MOON BLINK 2015, 10 min, digital<br />NOT EVEN NOTHING CAN BE FREE OF GHOSTS 2016, 11 min, digital<br />KEEP THAT DREAM BURNING 2017, 8 min, 35mm<br />WEALTH &ndash; SNARES 2017, 3.5 min, digital<br />MORE THAN EVERYTHING 2018, 12 min, digital<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 65 min.<br /><br /><img src="https://www.bmeia.gv.at/fileadmin/_processed_/3/4/csm_nycbig_38e7dbb1d3.jpg" alt="" width="59" height="104" /><br /><br /></p> Wednesday, October 24 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49944 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Thursday, October 25 EC: TOM, TOM, THE PIPER'S SON http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49823 <p>&ldquo;Original 1905 film shot and probably directed by G.W. &lsquo;Billy&rsquo; Bitzer, rescued via a paper print filed for copyright purposes with the Library of Congress. It is most reverently examined here, absolutely loved, with a new movie, almost as a side effect, coming into being.&rdquo; &ndash;K.J.</p> Friday, October 26 EC: LARRY JORDAN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49824 <p>DUO CONCERTANTES (1962-64, 6 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />HAMFAT ASAR (1965, 13 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />GYMNOPEDIES (1968, 6 min, 16mm)<br />THE OLD HOUSE, PASSING (1966, 45 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />OUR LADY OF THE SPHERE (1968, 9 min, 35mm)<br />&ldquo;With a taste for nostalgic romanticism&hellip;Jordan creates a magical universe of work using old steel engravings and collectable memorabilia. His 50-year pursuit into the subconscious mind gives him a place in the annals of cinema as a prolific animator on a voyage into the surreal psychology of the inner self.&rdquo; &ndash;Jackie Leger<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Saturday, October 27 EC: JENNINGS / KIRSANOFF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49825 <p>Humphrey Jennings<br />LISTEN TO BRITAIN (1941, 19 min, 35mm, b&amp;w)<br />Jennings&rsquo;s film is a masterpiece of sound mixing; it creates an audio landscape of Britain during the war, with images both accompanying and conflicting with the multitude of sounds.<br /><br />Dimitri Kirsanoff<br />M&Eacute;NILMONTANT (1924-25, 38 min, 35mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />&ldquo;[T]o a remarkable degree, M&Eacute;NILMONTANT seems an autonomous creation, as sophisticated and demanding as any narrative film of the silent period, without obvious imitators. Although Richard Abel has astutely called attention to aspects the film shares with Abel Gance&rsquo;s LA ROUE (1923) and Leon Moussinac&rsquo;s LE BRASIER ARDENT (1923)&hellip;and with Jean Epstein&rsquo;s COEUR FIDELE (1923)&hellip;any comparison of the film as a whole with those admirable works would have to underline the intensity, uniqueness, and exceptional rigor of Kirsanoff&rsquo;s achievement.&rdquo; &ndash;P. Adams Sitney, THE CINEMA OF POETRY<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 60 min.</p> Saturday, October 27 NEAR DEATH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=10&year=2018#showing-49925 <p>Wiseman&rsquo;s longest film, and one of his most shattering, NEAR DEATH was filmed at the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Boston&rsquo;s Beth Israel Hospital. It charts the complex interrelationships among patients, families, doctors, nurses, hospital staff, and religious advisors as they confront the personal, ethical, medical, psychological, religious, and legal issues involved in making decisions about whether or not to give life-sustaining treatment to dying patients. Despite its length, NEAR DEATH is paradoxically distinguished by its intense, unrelenting focus. Rather than a panoramic portrait of a large community or institution, it limits itself to following just a handful of doctors and nurses, capturing the grueling repetitiveness of their work days as they endeavor &ndash; for the most part sensitively and with extraordinary patience &ndash; to lead their patients&rsquo; families to the realization that their loved ones are facing either death or a condition that is life only in the most literal sense. Consisting largely of long, circling conversations that Wiseman is determined to capture in all their repetitiveness and incremental progress, NEAR DEATH is as much about the acceptance of death among the living as it is about death itself.<br /><br />&ldquo;[L]ess a viewing experience than a total immersion. It isn&rsquo;t the running time that makes NEAR DEATH so overwhelming; it&rsquo;s the subject itself. But at this length, the film has time to carry its audience from an initially raw emotional response to a calmer consideration of the difficult issues raised here, and finally on to some sort of resolution.&rdquo; &ndash;Janet Maslin, NEW YORK TIMES<br /><br /></p> Sunday, October 28