Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Tue, 24 Apr 2018 12:26:30 -0400 TRANS FILM: FLUIDØ http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48851 <p>GUEST CURATED AND PRESENTED BY S. H. VARINO<br /><br />DOUBLE LUST: PART 2:</p> <p>Shu Lea Cheang<br />FLUID&Oslash;<br />(2017, 99 min, digital)<br />Set in the post-AIDS future of 2060, where the Government is the first to declare the era AIDS FREE, mutated AIDS viruses give birth to ZERO GEN &ndash; humans that have genetically evolved in a very unique way. These gender fluid ZERO GENs are the bio-drug carriers whose white fluid is the hypernarcotic for the 21st century, taking over the markets of the 20th century white powder high. The ejaculate of these beings is intoxicating and the new form of sexual commodity in the future. The new drug, code named DELTA, diffuses through skin contact and creates an addictive high. A new war on drugs begins and the ZERO GEN are declared illegal. The Government dispatches drug-resistant replicants for round-up arrest missions. When one of these government android&rsquo;s immunity breaks down and its pleasure centers are activated, the story becomes a tangled multi-thread plot and the ZERO GENs are caught among underground drug lords, glitched super agents, a scheming corporation, and a corrupt government.</p> Tuesday, April 24 NYWIFT: PROGRAM 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48932 <p>Emily Elizabeth Thomas (Director/Writer) &amp; Anna Fredrikke Bjerke (Producer/NYWIFT Member)<br />LOLA: GIRL GOT A GUN<br />(2017, 15 min, digital)<br />This film depicts a young girl&rsquo;s search for purpose and belonging in a conservative West Texas household. Will she become who her family wants her to be? Or will she become the bold and brave woman she desires to be?<br /><br />Megan Smith-Harris (Director/Producer) &amp; Laela Kilbourn (Director of Photography)<br />THE BUDDY SYSTEM<br />(2017, 58 min, digital)<br />Children on the autism spectrum, who are often shunned, misunderstood, and socially isolated, need a friend more than most. THE BUDDY SYSTEM examines the extraordinary impact that specially trained autism assistance dogs have on the children they serve. Following three separate families, the film reveals what happens when service dogs enter the children&rsquo;s lives: their verbal development, self-control, and social interactions improve dramatically, and their confidence soars.</p> Tuesday, April 24 TRANS FILM: RUKUS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48854 <p>NYC PREMIERE!<br /><br />FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Brett Hanover<br />RUKUS<br />(2018, 87 min, digital)<br />Brett Hanover&rsquo;s raw documentary/fiction hybrid film locates the queer coming-of-age story amid dated hotel furry conventions, steamy southern punk houses, and unending virtual worlds. Rukus is a 20-year-old furry artist living with his boyfriend Sable in the suburbs of Orlando, Florida. Through his sprawling graphic novels, Rukus constructs an imaginary universe where painful childhood memories are restaged as epic fantasies. Brett is a 16-year-old filmmaker with OCD trying to figure out his position in kinky subcultures. The two develop an unexpected online friendship which propels an exploration and reimagining of who they are and who they want to be.</p> Tuesday, April 24 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48938 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, April 25 ‘MANUEL DELANDA: ISM ISM’ BOOK RELEASE SCREENING! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48899 <p>MANUEL DELANDA IN PERSON!<br /><br />Recognized today as a philosopher, professor, and author (of WAR IN THE AGE OF INTELLIGENT MACHINES and A THOUSAND YEARS OF NONLINEAR HISTORY, among other titles), Manuel DeLanda initially came to prominence as one of the premier experimental filmmakers of his generation. Fueled by the gonzo humor and graphic audacity of Frank Zappa and ZAP Comix, DeLanda&rsquo;s fevered productions were among the most deliriously innovative movies of the punk era. While films like RAW NERVES: A LACANIAN THRILLER and INCONTINENCE: A DIARRHETIC FLOW OF OBVIOUS MISMATCHES are certified underground classics, DeLanda&rsquo;s visually striking, virtually unknown graffiti work (signed with the tag &ldquo;ISM ISM&rdquo;) has long remained more urban legend than legendary.<br /><br />That is hopefully poised to change now that Anthology has teamed up once again with J&amp;L Books (our partner for recent publications devoted to Harry Smith&rsquo;s collections) to issue MANUEL DELANDA: ISM ISM. This new book presents a comprehensive overview of DeLanda&rsquo;s ephemeral street collages with a colorful frame-by-frame breakdown of a Super 8mm short film completed in 1979 in order to document his sweetly subversive activities. Extensive still images, an expansive interview, and copious contextual materials combine to illustrate the story of DeLanda&rsquo;s aesthetic attack on 23rd Street, including his friendly competition with fellow artist-taggers Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat.<br /><br />To celebrate the release of this new publication, we proudly present a selection of DeLanda&rsquo;s moving-image work, including the eponymous film, ISM ISM, and the premieres of two new videos.<br /><br />In conjunction with this screening, two bookstore release events will be held in April. For more info, please visit: ismism.net and jandlbooks.org<br /><br />Special thanks to Jason Fulford (J&amp;L Books), Andrew Lampert, and Jamie Johnston (DAP).<br /><br />SALIVA DILDO &ndash; PREMATURE EJACULATORS (1976, 2 min, 16mm-to-digital. Digitized with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Special thanks to M. Henry Jones.)<br />A recently rediscovered fragment from an early film, featuring regular DeLanda collaborator M. Henry Jones navigating time-warped NYC sidewalks.<br /><br />ISM ISM (1979, 8 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm. Preserved with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.)<br />&ldquo;ISM ISM documents my graffiti activities in New York. The film was originally made as a class project for P. Adams Sitney. It has the form of a manifesto against the orthopedic power of language.&rdquo; &ndash;Manuel DeLanda<br /><br />ANONYMOUS MULTITUDES (2015, 8 min, digital)<br />DeLanda takes on the NYC masses, deforming faces and stretching moving figures in strange and disorienting ways.<br /><br />HARMFUL OR FATAL IF SWALLOWED (1982, 14 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm-to digital. Digitized by Anthology Film Archives with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.)<br />A dynamic and demented city symphony, HARMFUL takes the extreme techniques of DeLanda&rsquo;s earlier films and unleashes them on the businessmen and denizens of NYC. Outlandish and truly unforgettable, this film premiered in a slightly neutered version at the 1982 New York Film Festival, where it elicited many loud hisses and boos. Anthology&rsquo;s new digital restoration features the recently rediscovered original edit.<br /><br />THE SUPER 8 SHOW: BEYOND HOME MOVIES (1981, 7-min excerpt, U-Matic videotape-to-digital. Produced by John Sanborn and Kit Fitzgerald for WNET/New York.)<br />Manuel DeLanda discusses his Super 8mm filmmaking in this rare video interview originally produced for WNET in connection with J. Hoberman&rsquo;s 1981 Anthology screening series, &ldquo;Home Made Movies: 20 Years of American 8mm and Super-8 films.&rdquo;<br /><br />FRACTURED LANDSCAPES (2014, 12 min, digital)<br />Through digital layering and animating masks DeLanda creates a dissonant kaleidoscopic urban symphony, bending, mirroring, and distorting New York&rsquo;s unique architectural surroundings.<br /><br />JUDGEMENT DAY (1983, 8 min, Super 8mm-to-16mm. Preserved with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.)<br />Cockroaches meet their maker in the first installment of DeLanda&rsquo;s incomplete &ldquo;Jerry Falwell trilogy.&rdquo;<br /><br />ELECTRIC ARTHROPODS (2017, 3 min, digital. <strong>Theatrical premiere!</strong>)<br />DeLanda revisits the horror of insects in macro, electrically colorized among animated particle backgrounds.<br /><br />TWISTED FLESH (2018, 3 min, digital. <strong>Theatrical premiere!</strong>)<br />A &ldquo;battle&rdquo; between complex image processing and pornography. Will porno always win?<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 70 min.</p> Wednesday, April 25 SHOW & TELL: JON BEACHAM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48935 <p>As a filmmaker working in the medium of 16mm silent film, Jon Beacham&rsquo;s work focuses on the world close at hand. His use of color and light illuminate and bring a focused attention to the wordless world we pass through daily. Beacham also works in collage, photography, letterpress printing, and bookmaking. He runs the publishing imprint The Brother in Elysium, which provides a context for his work, as does his practice of collaborating with like-minded poets and artists. The Brother in Elysium has also operated a 16mm film series since 2008, projecting prints in non-theater venues. Beacham currently resides in Kingston, New York.<br /><br />RETURN (2006, 10 min, 16mm, silent)<br />Shot over the course of one year beginning in Bolinas, CA, and moving through San Francisco, New York, and Cleveland. We see glimpses of all of these locations &ndash; from San Francisco&rsquo;s Chinatown to NYC&rsquo;s East Village &amp; Lower East Side, evoking a feeling of people moving through time and space before the onslaught of digital delirium. RETURN will be screening from an original Kodachrome print.<br /><br />THE LAST ROLL OF KODACHROME (2007, 3 min, 16mm, silent)<br />The last roll of this wonderful film stock which went through my Bolex before Kodak shamefully pulled the plug on its production. It was initially intended for a project, but upon viewing I decided to keep it in its original format as an unedited camera roll. An exercise in process and the idea of &lsquo;first thought, best thought.&rsquo; Shot during the summer of 2007 while living in the Catskills.<br /><br />WHAT I SAW ON THE PERIPHERY (2011, 10 min, 16mm, silent)<br />A travel film shot in the Midwest, constructed in eight parts focusing on locations in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ohio. Interspersed chapter headings &ndash; Houghton, Michigan / Poor Farm / Photographing Buildings / Winter in the Country &ndash; give a sense of the feeling of this film.<br /><br />DAYBOOKS (2017, 9 min, 16mm, silent)<br />Shot primarily in Kingston.<br />Daily.<br />Out walking.<br />Looking at the things which hold oneself.<br /><br />FILM FOR VIOLET (2017, 7 min, 16mm, silent)<br />A portrait of my grandmother Violet&rsquo;s house and Lake Erie. Shot in Euclid, Ohio, slowly over the course of three years. Golden light and the calm of the lake. A film about an interior.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 45 min.</p> Thursday, April 26 CANYON CINEMA 50: PROGRAM 1: STUDIES IN NATURAL MAGIC http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48834 <p>Saul Levine LIGHT LICK: AMEN (2017, 4 min, 16mm, silent)<br />&ldquo;A stark portrait of my father at daily morning prayers to which I respond, AMEN. LIGHT LICKS are a series of films I began in 1999. The films are made frame by frame, often by&nbsp; flooding the camera with enough light to spill beyond the gate into the frame left unexposed. LIGHT LICKS are ecstatic flicker films inspired by jazz and mystic visionary practice, and extend my interest in the ways film can be a medium of visual improvisation.&rdquo; &ndash;Saul Levine<br /><br />Standish Lawder CAT FILM FOR KATY AND CYNNIE (1973, 3 min, 16mm, silent. New print, preserved by the Academy Film Archive!)<br />&ldquo;In the early 1970s, a New York cat-lover and filmmaker named Pola Chapelle produced a &lsquo;Cat Film Festival,&rsquo; which was shown in a large downtown NYC auditorium to an audience of more than a thousand cat-lovers. At the time, I lived with my wife Ursula and our daughters Katy and Cynnie, together with many, too many cats. I loved my family but not the cats.&rdquo; &ndash;Standish Lawder<br /><br />Betzy Bromberg CIAO BELLA or FUCK ME DEAD (1978, 9 min, 16mm. New print!)<br />&ldquo;CIAO BELLA is a summer-in-the-city travelogue that mixes v&eacute;rité of Lower East Side Bikers, Times Square topless dancers, and Coney Island crowds to achieve a highly charged atmosphere of manic exhibitionism and sexual raunch.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman<br /><br />Christopher Harris 28.IV.81 (BEDOUIN SPARK) (2009, 3 min, 16mm, silent)<br />&ldquo;Approximates a small child&rsquo;s fantasy world in the dark. In a series of close-ups, the nightlight is transformed into a meditative star-spangled sky. An improvisation, edited inside the camera and shot on a single reel. The stars swirl in silence.&rdquo; &ndash;INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ROTTERDAM<br /><br />Emily Richardson REDSHIFT (2001, 4 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;In astronomical terminology redshift is a term used in calculating the distance of stars from the earth, hence determining their age. REDSHIFT attempts to show the huge geometry of the night sky and give an altered perspective of the landscape, using long exposures, fixed camera positions, long shots and time-lapse animation techniques to reveal aspects of the night that are invisible to the naked eye.&rdquo; &ndash;Emily Richardson<br /><br />Charlotte Pryce A STUDY IN NATURAL MAGIC (2013, 3 min, 16mm, silent)<br />&ldquo;Witness an alchemist&rsquo;s spell: the transmutation of light into substance: a glimpse of gold.&rdquo; &ndash;Charlotte Pryce<br /><br />Robert Fulton STARLIGHT (1970, 5 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;A Tibetan Lama. His disciple. The disciple&rsquo;s wife, young boy and terrier. An old tugboat crossing the Mississippi River. A man in his seventh month of solitude. His hermitage built by his own hands. The man&rsquo;s bloodhound; his cat. Clouds crossing the Continental Divide. A mountain stream. A girl. The sun.&rdquo; &ndash;Robert Fulton<br /><br />Jean Sousa SWISH (1982, 3 min, 16mm, silent)<br />&ldquo;The subject of the film is motion, and it is an attempt to get inside of it. It was made with a moving subject and a moving camera with an open shutter, the result being that each frame is unique, without the smooth continuity that is expected in film. The subject, a female body at close range, provides an intimacy and eroticism. At the same time it can be seen as a modern version of Futurist simultaneity.&rdquo; &ndash;Jean Sousa<br /><br />Gary Beydler HAND HELD DAY (1975, 6 min, 16mm, silent. New print, preserved by the Academy Film Archive!)<br />&ldquo;Over the course of two Kodachrome camera rolls, we simultaneously witness eastward and westward views of the surrounding landscape as the skies, shadows, colors, and light change dramatically. Beydler&rsquo;s hand, holding the mirror carefully in front of the camera, quivers and vibrates, suggesting the relatively miniscule scale of humanity in the face of a monumental landscape and its dramatic transformations.&rdquo; &ndash;Mark Toscano<br /><br />Greta Snider PORTLAND (1996, 12 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />&ldquo;Three friends, including the filmmaker, rendezvous in Portland by hitchhiking or train-hopping from different cities. After a week of arguments, soup kitchens, brushes with the law, and bad weather, each leaves with a different memory of the trip, refracted through the tensions and expectations of their triangulated friendship.&rdquo; &ndash;Greta Snider<br /><br />Scott Stark DEGREES OF LIMITATION (1982, 3 min, 16mm, silent. New print!)<br />&ldquo;A single 100&rsquo; roll shot with a hand-wound 16mm Bolex. For each shot the camera was wound one additional time, allowing me to make it a little bit farther up the hill. Will I reach the top before the film runs out? A study in self-imposed limitations.&rdquo; &ndash;Scott Stark<br /><br />David Gatten SHRIMP BOAT LOG (2006/10, 6 min, 16mm, silent)<br />&ldquo;A mathematical concept by Leonardo da Vinci, translated into a beautiful conceptual film consisting of 300 shots, each 29 frames long. Footage of a logbook of shrimp boat names and the image of those same boats at the mouth of the Edisto River.&rdquo; &ndash;Erwin Van&rsquo;t Hart, INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ROTTERDAM<br /><br />Peter Hutton BOSTON FIRE (1979, 8 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.)<br />&ldquo;BOSTON FIRE finds grandeur in smoke rising eloquently from a city blaze. Billowing puffs of darkness blend with fountains of water streaming in from off screen to orchestrate a play of primal elements. The beautiful texture of the smoke coupled with the isolation from the source of the fire erases the destructive impact of the event. The camera, lost in the immense dark clouds, produces images for meditation removed from the causes or consequences of the scene.&rdquo; &ndash;MILLENNIUM FILM JOURNAL<br /><br />Julie Murray ORCHARD (2004, 10 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;Much of the footage that comprises ORCHARD is of a 19th-century ruins that included a walled orchard in an area known as Rostellen in southwest Ireland. It is set deep in the woods and the crumbling brick and mortar of the broken walls has become the anchor for the roots of slender trees, so uninhibited for all this time that they reach twenty feet in height and have thick roots that follow like slow lazy trickles of water and in other places branch and wind over the brickwork in an apparently intelligent arterial arrangement reminiscent of the human body.&rdquo; &ndash;Julie Murray<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Friday, April 27 DONNA HARAWAY: STORY TELLING FOR EARTHLY SURVIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48921 <p>ENCORE SCREENINGS!<br /><br /><strong>ADVANCED TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE: <a href="https://donnaharaway.bpt.me">https://donnaharaway.bpt.me</a></strong><br /><br />Distributed by Icarus Films; special thanks to Jonathan Miller, Livia Bloom Ingram &amp; Bob Hunter, as well as to the Swiss Institute.<br /><br />Feminist thinker and historian of science Donna Haraway is best known as the author of two revolutionary works: the essay &ldquo;The Cyborg Manifesto&rdquo; and the book PRIMATE VISIONS. Both set out to upend well-established &ldquo;common sense&rdquo; categories: breaking down the boundaries among humans, animals, and machines while challenging gender essentialism; and questioning the underlying assumptions of humanity&rsquo;s fascination with primates through a post-colonial lens.<br /><br />This filmic portrait features Haraway in a playful and engaging exploration of her life, influences, and ideas. Haraway is a passionate and discursive storyteller, and the film is structured around a series of discussions held in her California home, on subjects including capitalism and the anthropocene (a term she uses but finds troubling), science fiction writing as philosophical text, kinship relations, the roles of storytelling and Catholicism in her upbringing, humans and dogs, the suppression of women&rsquo;s writing, the surprisingly fascinating history of orthodontic aesthetics, and the need for new post-colonial and post-patriarchal narratives.<br /><br />Haraway and filmmaker Fabrizio Terranova (who we hear but don&rsquo;t see) are clearly at ease with each other, giving the conversations a casual, intimate feel, while Terranova makes playful use of green screens to illustrate Haraway&rsquo;s words, or to comment on them. A clever and insightful glimpse into the thought of a major contemporary figure, DONNA HARAWAY generated a rapturous response during a recent preview event here, and we&rsquo;re pleased to follow up with these encore screenings!<br /><br />&ldquo;An ode to this thinker&rsquo;s expansive mind and life. Besides a heady, speculative journey through theory, politics, sci-fi, and so much else, you get a sense of the deep joy that Haraway takes in all life.&rdquo; &ndash;GARAGE MAGAZINE, VICE<br /><br /><br /></p> Friday, April 27 CANYON CINEMA 50: PROGRAM 2: ASSOCIATIONS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48836 <p>Mark Toscano RELEASING HUMAN ENERGIES (2012, 5.5 min, 16mm. New print!)<br />&ldquo;A film about control. A refinement of energy for purposes of conserving resources, materials, impetus, potential, so they might all be narrowly channeled toward an unquestioned goal of maximum profit with minimum waste. Capitalism, in this example, as a process of understanding how to make use of someone as efficiently as possible to get the most out of them that is desired. Instructions for keeping people on task.&rdquo; &ndash;Mark Toscano<br /><br />Sara Kathryn Arledge WHAT IS A MAN? (1958, 10 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;WHAT IS A MAN? propels Sara Kathryn Arledge from the realm of formal experimentation to social satire. Made with a remarkably sharp wit and a trenchant, mocking view of gender conventions, Arledge gives us a work far ahead of its time. Begun in 1951, Arledge received the first Creative Film Foundation award (established by Maya Deren) for script development in 1956 and completed the film in 1958. It was not until Nelly Kaplan&rsquo;s also neglected feature A VERY CURIOUS GIRL (1969) that women&rsquo;s cinema would once again celebrate such a spirited, subversive artist.&rdquo; &ndash;Bill Nichols<br /><br />John Smith ASSOCIATIONS (1975, 7 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;Images from magazines and color supplements accompany a spoken text taken from &lsquo;Word Associations and Linguistic Theory&rsquo; by Herbert H. Clark. By using the ambiguities inherent in the English language, ASSOCIATIONS sets language against itself. Image and word work together/against each other to destroy/create meaning.&rdquo; &ndash;John Smith<br /><br />Robert Nelson HOT LEATHERETTE (1967, 5 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. New print, preserved by the Academy Film Archive!)<br />&ldquo;A kinetic film sketch designed to involve the viewers&rsquo; muscles. The rocky seaside cliffs near Stinson Beach, California, hold the wrecked carcass of a #52 pickup that is a rusting monument to Hot Leatherette.&rdquo; &ndash;Robert Nelson<br /><br />Barbara Hammer DYKETACTICS (1974, 4 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;A popular lesbian &lsquo;commercial,&rsquo; 110 images of sensual touching montages in A, B, C, D rolls of &lsquo;kinaesthetic&rsquo; editing.&rdquo; &ndash;Barbara Hammer<br /><br />Stephanie Barber FLOWER, THE BOY, THE LIBRARIAN (1997, 5 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a love story, with the usual dashing figures and old habits of spelling, repetition and listing.&rdquo; &ndash;Stephanie Barber<br /><br />Phil Solomon THE SNOWMAN (1995, 8 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;A meditation on memory, burial and decay &ndash; a belated kaddish for my father.&rdquo; &ndash;Phil Solomon<br /><br />Robert Breer SWISS ARMY KNIFE WITH RATS &amp; PIGEONS (1981, 6.5 min, 16mm-to-35mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with generous support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.)<br />&ldquo;&hellip;a typically bravura and delightful display of simple objective forms flashing, rotating, and dissolving into abstraction&hellip;&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman<br /><br />Curt McDowell CONFESSIONS (1971, 11 min, 16mm, b&amp;w. New print, preserved by the Academy Film Archive!)<br />As part of a &ldquo;legendary body of work that is wildly life-affirming, bawdy, tender, often hilarious, sassy and frequently penetrating&rdquo; (Mark Toscano), the nakedly personal CONFESSIONS, made while Curt McDowell (1945-87) was a graduate student in San Francisco, opens with the filmmaker looking into the camera while directly addressing his parents (who never did see the film) as he tenderly admits to childhood thefts and lies, drinking and taking drugs, and bluntly describes his varied sexual experiences.<br /><br />Thad Povey THINE INWARD-LOOKING EYES (1993, 2 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;To paraphrase something Lao Tzu didn&rsquo;t say: This film&rsquo;s an empty cup &ndash; You fill it up.&rdquo; &ndash;Thad Povey<br /><br />Abigail Child MERCY (1989, 10 min, 16mm)<br />The final film in Abigail Child&rsquo;s seven-part series &ldquo;Is This What You Were Born For?&rdquo;, Child has described MERCY as &ldquo;dissecting the game mass media plays with our private perceptions.&rdquo; Child masterfully composes a rhythmic collage of symmetries and asymmetries in a fluid essay that forefronts the treatment of the body as a mechanized instrument &ndash; placing the body in relation to the man-made landscape of factories, amusement parks and urban office complexes. With vocals performed by Shelley Hirsch.<br /><br />Richard Myers AKBAR (1970, 16 min, 16mm. New print, preserved by the Academy Film Archive!)<br />&ldquo;A conversation with a friend &ndash; Ahmed Akbar. A short interview-type film portrait with Akbar, a black filmmaker and former student of mine at Kent State. Akbar expresses an unusual and exciting view of himself/blacks in America/and such varied subjects as &lsquo;this moon race shit!&rsquo; A friendly, lively, exciting portrait of a very extraordinary person from Akron, Ohio.&rdquo; &ndash;Richard Myers<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.</p> Saturday, April 28 DONNA HARAWAY: STORY TELLING FOR EARTHLY SURVIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48922 <p>ENCORE SCREENINGS!<br /><br /><strong>ADVANCED TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE: <a href="https://donnaharaway.bpt.me">https://donnaharaway.bpt.me</a></strong><br /><br />Distributed by Icarus Films; special thanks to Jonathan Miller, Livia Bloom Ingram &amp; Bob Hunter, as well as to the Swiss Institute.<br /><br />Feminist thinker and historian of science Donna Haraway is best known as the author of two revolutionary works: the essay &ldquo;The Cyborg Manifesto&rdquo; and the book PRIMATE VISIONS. Both set out to upend well-established &ldquo;common sense&rdquo; categories: breaking down the boundaries among humans, animals, and machines while challenging gender essentialism; and questioning the underlying assumptions of humanity&rsquo;s fascination with primates through a post-colonial lens.<br /><br />This filmic portrait features Haraway in a playful and engaging exploration of her life, influences, and ideas. Haraway is a passionate and discursive storyteller, and the film is structured around a series of discussions held in her California home, on subjects including capitalism and the anthropocene (a term she uses but finds troubling), science fiction writing as philosophical text, kinship relations, the roles of storytelling and Catholicism in her upbringing, humans and dogs, the suppression of women&rsquo;s writing, the surprisingly fascinating history of orthodontic aesthetics, and the need for new post-colonial and post-patriarchal narratives.<br /><br />Haraway and filmmaker Fabrizio Terranova (who we hear but don&rsquo;t see) are clearly at ease with each other, giving the conversations a casual, intimate feel, while Terranova makes playful use of green screens to illustrate Haraway&rsquo;s words, or to comment on them. A clever and insightful glimpse into the thought of a major contemporary figure, DONNA HARAWAY generated a rapturous response during a recent preview event here, and we&rsquo;re pleased to follow up with these encore screenings!<br /><br />&ldquo;An ode to this thinker&rsquo;s expansive mind and life. Besides a heady, speculative journey through theory, politics, sci-fi, and so much else, you get a sense of the deep joy that Haraway takes in all life.&rdquo; &ndash;GARAGE MAGAZINE, VICE<br /><br /><br /></p> Saturday, April 28 CANYON CINEMA 50: PROGRAM 3: DECODINGS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48838 <p>Lawrence Jordan DUO CONCERTANTES (1964, 9 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />&ldquo;Birds, butterflies, old engravings &ndash; the mind&rsquo;s moving fantasmagoria. A binder on the spell of the white witch.&rdquo; &ndash;Lawrence Jordan<br />&ldquo;Jordan&rsquo;s imagery is exquisite and eloquent, concentrating on simple, repeated use of particularly poetic symbols and figures, a conglomerative effect of old Gustave Dor&eacute; drawings, 19th century whatnot memorabilia, all fused to a totally aware perception.&rdquo; &ndash;Lita Eliseu<br /><br />Will Hindle BILLABONG (1969, 9 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;A remarkably intimate and at times palpably erotic study of boys in a Job Corps camp on the Oregon coast, BILLABONG is a sensuously humanist encounter with alienated youth, told in the filmmaker&rsquo;s trademark undulating lap dissolves and scintillatingly grainy high contrasts. Loneliness and longing-for-elsewhere alternate with horseplay and horniness, and hijinks around urinals and pool tables culminate in an ecstatic moment of onanistic release.&rdquo; &ndash;Chuck Stephens<br /><br />Tom Palazzolo LOVE IT / LEAVE IT (1973, 15 min, 16mm. New print, preserved by Chicago Filmmakers with funding by the National Film Preservation Foundation!)<br />&ldquo;What you see is what you get, as heimlich and American as apple pie and neo-Nazis: fragments and fleeting glimpses of neighborhood gatherings and celebrations, ball games, Civil War re-enactments, wrestling matches, rock concerts, and the 1968 Democratic National Convention all join in LOVE IT / LEAVE IT&rsquo;s visual churn, while Ray Wilding White&rsquo;s musique concrète soundtrack loops and reloops the film&rsquo;s titular mantra &ndash; a dialectical cri de coeur in which the former proposition is clearly the salutary one: to leave America would be to miss the parades, this rich pageant of life, these boobs and their boobs.&rdquo; &ndash;Chuck Stephens<br /><br />Naomi Uman REMOVED (1999, 6 min, 16mm. New print!)<br />&ldquo;Using a piece of found European porn from the 1970s, nail polish and bleach, this film creates a new pornography, one in which the woman exists only as a hole, an empty, animated space.&rdquo; &ndash;Naomi Uman<br /><br />Cauleen Smith CHRONICLES OF A LYING SPIRIT (BY KELLY GABRON) (1992, 6.5 min, 16mm. New print, preserved by the Academy Film Archive!)<br />&ldquo;Less a depiction of &lsquo;reality&rsquo; than an exploration of the implications of the mediation of Black history by film, television, magazines and newspapers. Using her alter ego, Kelly Gabron, Smith fabricates a personal history of her emergence as an artist from white-male-dominated American history (and American film history).&rdquo; &ndash;Scott MacDonald<br /><br />Jodie Mack POINT DE GAZE (2012, 5 min, 16mm, silent)<br />&ldquo;Named after a type of Belgian lace, this fabric flicker film investigates intricate illusion and optical arrest.&rdquo; &ndash;Jodie Mack<br /><br />Mariah Garnett ENCOUNTERS I MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE HAD WITH PETER BERLIN (2014, 14 min, 16mm)<br />ENCOUNTERS deals primarily with monumentality, narcissism and the ways in which our heroes are embedded into our identities, and manifested through the body. Through a variety of gestures, the pervasiveness of this practice is highlighted alongside its ultimate, inevitable failure. The viewer moves through various stages of anxiety, idolization and actual touchdown with 70s gay sex icon Peter Berlin himself, capturing both the apparent and the hidden.<br /><br />JoAnn Elam LIE BACK &amp; ENJOY IT (1982, 8 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />&ldquo;An absorbing eight-minute dialectical film about the politics of representation. More specifically, it examines the politics of filmic representation of women under patriarchy. [&hellip;] The film is endowed with remarkable structural and rhetorical lucidity.&rdquo; &ndash;Claudia Gorbman<br /><br />Michael Wallin DECODINGS (1988, 15 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />&ldquo;A profoundly moving, allegorical search for identity from the documents of collective memory, in this case, found footage from the 1940s and 50s. [&hellip;] The search for self ends in aching poignancy with stills of a boy and his mother at the kitchen table, catching the moment that marks the dawning of anguish and loss; desire becomes imprinted on that which was long ago.&rdquo; &ndash;Manohla Dargis<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.</p> Saturday, April 28 DONNA HARAWAY: STORY TELLING FOR EARTHLY SURVIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48923 <p>ENCORE SCREENINGS!<br /><br /><strong>ADVANCED TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE: <a href="https://donnaharaway.bpt.me">https://donnaharaway.bpt.me</a></strong><br /><br />Distributed by Icarus Films; special thanks to Jonathan Miller, Livia Bloom Ingram &amp; Bob Hunter, as well as to the Swiss Institute.<br /><br />Feminist thinker and historian of science Donna Haraway is best known as the author of two revolutionary works: the essay &ldquo;The Cyborg Manifesto&rdquo; and the book PRIMATE VISIONS. Both set out to upend well-established &ldquo;common sense&rdquo; categories: breaking down the boundaries among humans, animals, and machines while challenging gender essentialism; and questioning the underlying assumptions of humanity&rsquo;s fascination with primates through a post-colonial lens.<br /><br />This filmic portrait features Haraway in a playful and engaging exploration of her life, influences, and ideas. Haraway is a passionate and discursive storyteller, and the film is structured around a series of discussions held in her California home, on subjects including capitalism and the anthropocene (a term she uses but finds troubling), science fiction writing as philosophical text, kinship relations, the roles of storytelling and Catholicism in her upbringing, humans and dogs, the suppression of women&rsquo;s writing, the surprisingly fascinating history of orthodontic aesthetics, and the need for new post-colonial and post-patriarchal narratives.<br /><br />Haraway and filmmaker Fabrizio Terranova (who we hear but don&rsquo;t see) are clearly at ease with each other, giving the conversations a casual, intimate feel, while Terranova makes playful use of green screens to illustrate Haraway&rsquo;s words, or to comment on them. A clever and insightful glimpse into the thought of a major contemporary figure, DONNA HARAWAY generated a rapturous response during a recent preview event here, and we&rsquo;re pleased to follow up with these encore screenings!<br /><br />&ldquo;An ode to this thinker&rsquo;s expansive mind and life. Besides a heady, speculative journey through theory, politics, sci-fi, and so much else, you get a sense of the deep joy that Haraway takes in all life.&rdquo; &ndash;GARAGE MAGAZINE, VICE<br /><br /><br /></p> Saturday, April 28 HARUN FAROCKI: PROGRAM 4 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48891 <p>BEDTIME STORIES: RAILWAYS / EINSCHLAFGESCHICHTEN<br />(1977, 3 min, 16mm-to-digital. In German with English subtitles.)<br /><br />IMAGES OF THE WORLD AND THE INSCRIPTION OF WAR / BILDER DER WELT UND INSCHRIFT DES KRIEGES<br />(1988, 77 min, 16mm-to-digital. In German with English subtitles.)<br />This film focuses on the &lsquo;blind spots&rsquo; in the interpretation of aerial photographs taken during an American bombing raid in 1944 of an industrial plant in Germany. Only decades later, when the photos were analyzed by the CIA, was it realized that the Auschwitz concentration camps were also captured in these images. Farocki shows the links between war and photography, exploring how perception during times of conflict is conditioned by what people want or don&rsquo;t want to see, rendering observers as either passive accomplices or victims in times of war.</p> Sunday, April 29 DONNA HARAWAY: STORY TELLING FOR EARTHLY SURVIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48924 <p>ENCORE SCREENINGS!<br /><br /><strong>ADVANCED TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE: <a href="https://donnaharaway.bpt.me">https://donnaharaway.bpt.me</a></strong><br /><br />Distributed by Icarus Films; special thanks to Jonathan Miller, Livia Bloom Ingram &amp; Bob Hunter, as well as to the Swiss Institute.<br /><br />Feminist thinker and historian of science Donna Haraway is best known as the author of two revolutionary works: the essay &ldquo;The Cyborg Manifesto&rdquo; and the book PRIMATE VISIONS. Both set out to upend well-established &ldquo;common sense&rdquo; categories: breaking down the boundaries among humans, animals, and machines while challenging gender essentialism; and questioning the underlying assumptions of humanity&rsquo;s fascination with primates through a post-colonial lens.<br /><br />This filmic portrait features Haraway in a playful and engaging exploration of her life, influences, and ideas. Haraway is a passionate and discursive storyteller, and the film is structured around a series of discussions held in her California home, on subjects including capitalism and the anthropocene (a term she uses but finds troubling), science fiction writing as philosophical text, kinship relations, the roles of storytelling and Catholicism in her upbringing, humans and dogs, the suppression of women&rsquo;s writing, the surprisingly fascinating history of orthodontic aesthetics, and the need for new post-colonial and post-patriarchal narratives.<br /><br />Haraway and filmmaker Fabrizio Terranova (who we hear but don&rsquo;t see) are clearly at ease with each other, giving the conversations a casual, intimate feel, while Terranova makes playful use of green screens to illustrate Haraway&rsquo;s words, or to comment on them. A clever and insightful glimpse into the thought of a major contemporary figure, DONNA HARAWAY generated a rapturous response during a recent preview event here, and we&rsquo;re pleased to follow up with these encore screenings!<br /><br />&ldquo;An ode to this thinker&rsquo;s expansive mind and life. Besides a heady, speculative journey through theory, politics, sci-fi, and so much else, you get a sense of the deep joy that Haraway takes in all life.&rdquo; &ndash;GARAGE MAGAZINE, VICE<br /><br /><br /></p> Sunday, April 29 CANYON CINEMA 50: PROGRAM 4: CONTINUUM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48840 <p>Bruce Baillie VALENTIN DE LAS SIERRAS (1968, 10 min, 16mm. New print!)<br />&ldquo;Song of revolutionary hero, Valentin, sung by Jose Santollo Nasido en Santa Cruz de la Soledad; Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico.&rdquo; &ndash;Bruce Baillie<br /><br />Gunvor Nelson MY NAME IS OONA (1969, 10 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />&ldquo;MY NAME IS OONA captures in haunting, intensely lyrical images fragments of the coming to consciousness of a child girl. A series of extremely brief flashes of her moving through night-lit space or woods in sensuous negative, separated by rapid fades into blackness, burst upon us like a fairy-tale princess, with a late sun only partially outlining her and the animal in silvery filigree against the encroaching darkness; one of the most perfect recent examples of poetic cinema. Throughout the entire film, the girl, compulsively and as if in awe, repeats her name, until it becomes a magic incantation of self-realization.&rdquo; &ndash;Amos Vogel<br /><br />Pat O&rsquo;Neill DOWN WIND (1973, 15 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;A thoughtful treatment of some of the problems we (mankind) have been having in dealing with our fellow species, animal and vegetable. Actually an undercover &lsquo;structural&rsquo; film, this one seems at first to be some sort of berserk travelogue. I spent years going to travelogues as a child, and still have a great fondness for visiting natural history museums in strange cities.&rdquo; &ndash;Pat O&rsquo;Neill<br /><br />Janie Geiser TERRACE 49 (2004, 5 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;Images of impending disaster &ndash; slamming doors, a truck careening down a hill, and a frayed, almost snapping, elevator rope &ndash; collide with the repeated image of a woman&rsquo;s body, cycling toward ephemerality as the woman disappears into the texture of the film itself.&rdquo; &ndash;Janie Geiser<br /><br />Tomonari Nishikawa MARKET STREET (2005, 5 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent. New print!)<br />&ldquo;As I am interested in the projection apparatus and human visual perception, I carefully juxtaposed images on Market Street by single-framing, in order to create certain happenings on the screen. By studying my super 8 films, SKETCH FILM #1 and SKETCH FILM #2, I made decisions for sequences of this film before working on this project. No re-photographing technique is involved. The result may look abstract, yet representative enough to show the characteristics of the street.&rdquo; &ndash;Tomonari Nishikawa<br /><br />Dominic Angerame CONTINUUM (1987, 17 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />&ldquo;CONTINUUM, though a film only 15 minutes in length, is one of the more remarkable works within recent cinematic history. In it, the world, the workers within the world, and the labor of making the film itself are equated through montage and a brilliantly concentrated filmic &lsquo;painterliness.&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;Jack Hirschman<br /><br />Karen Holmes SAVING THE PROOF (1979, 11 min, 16mm)<br />&ldquo;SAVING THE PROOF is a complex transformation of an ordinary action: a woman walking. The rhythm of her gait and the pulsating, repetitive sounds counterpoint with alternating images of her transversing city streets, passing windows and fences, descending stairs. As the images repeat and vary with mathematical precision, one becomes more interested in the process itself than in her destination.&rdquo; &ndash;Margaret Ganahl<br /><br />Chick Strand MUJER DE MILFUEGOS (1976, 15 min, 16mm. New print!)<br />&ldquo;A kind of heretic fantasy film. An expressionistic, surrealistic portrait of a Latin American woman. Not a personal portrait so much as an evocation of the consciousness of women in rural parts of such countries as Spain, Greece and Mexico; women who wear black from the age 15 and spend their entire lives giving birth, preparing food and tending to household and farm responsibilities. MUJER DE MILFUEGOS depicts in poetic, almost abstract terms, their daily repetitive tasks as a form of obsessive ritual.&rdquo; &ndash;Chick Strand<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 95 min.</p> Sunday, April 29 EC: STAN BRAKHAGE PGM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48896 <p>Unless otherwise noted, all films are silent.<br />ANTICIPATION OF THE NIGHT (1958, 40 min, 16mm)<br />CAT&rsquo;S CRADLE (1959, 6 min, 16mm)<br />SIRIUS REMEMBERED (1959, 12 min, 16mm)<br />THIGH LINE LYRE TRIANGULAR (1961, 9 min, 16mm)<br />MOTHLIGHT (1963, 4 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />BLUE MOSES (1963, 11 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, sound)<br />With ANTICIPATION OF THE NIGHT, Brakhage leaves psychodrama and enters the &ldquo;closed-eye vision&rdquo; period. This program also contains a unique example of a film made without a camera, MOTHLIGHT, and one of Brakhage&rsquo;s few sound (and &lsquo;acted&rsquo;) films, BLUE MOSES.<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Monday, April 30 EC: STAN BRAKHAGE PGM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=04&year=2018#showing-48897 <p>All films are silent.<br />THE WEIR-FALCON SAGA (1970, 29 min, 16mm)<br />THE MACHINE OF EDEN (1970, 11 min, 16mm)<br />SEXUAL MEDITATION #1: MOTEL (1970, 7 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)<br />ANGELS&rsquo; (1971, 2 min, 16mm)<br />DOOR (1971, 4 min, 16mm)<br />WESTERN HISTORY (1971, 8 min, 16mm)<br />THE PEACEABLE KINGDOM (1971, 8 min, 16mm)<br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Monday, April 30 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48939 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Tuesday, May 01 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48940 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, May 02 THE NEW YORK POLISH FILM FESTIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-49117 <p>The 14th New York Polish Film Festival shows the true face of contemporary Polish cinema. This year the Festival will present seven NYC premieres by young Polish directors.<br /><br />The last two years were exceptional ones for Polish cinema, as demonstrated both by the numerous awards received by Polish films at international film festivals and by the millions of tickets sold within Poland itself. The vitality of Polish cinema is a result of the great diversity of films that are being made. During the NYPFF, audiences can see blockbusters and period pieces, art-house works, movies that engage with social and political issues, and great documentary films.<br /><br />You are invited to discover new films and meet with the actors and directors to discuss what Polish filmmakers have to offer.<br /><br /><strong><em>Please visit our website for the full schedule: www.nypff.com</em></strong></p> Thursday, May 03 THE ABSENT STONE - Sandra Rozental in person! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-49086 <p>(LA PIEDRA AUSENTE)<br /><br />NYC PREMIERE!<br /><br />In 1964, the largest carved stone of the Americas was moved from the town of San Miguel Coatlinchan in the municipality of Texcoco to the National Anthropology Museum in Mexico City in an impressive feat of engineering. The extraction of the monolith, which represents the pre-Hispanic water deity, set off a rebellion in the town and led to the intervention of the army. Today, the enormous stone, now upright, is an urban monument; it has been transformed into one of the principal icons of Mexican national identity. The inhabitants of Coatlinchan insist that the removal of the stone has caused droughts. Representations and replicas of the absent stone appear everywhere in Coatlinchan, where it resonates in the memories of the inhabitants. Using animations, archival materials, and contemporary encounters with the protagonists of the transport of the stone, Sandra Rozental and Jesse Lerner&rsquo;s playful documentary film explores the relevance of the ruins of the past in the present day.<br /><br /><em><strong>Co-director Sandra Rozental will be here in person for a Q&amp;A following the screening!</strong></em></p> Thursday, May 03 THE NEW YORK POLISH FILM FESTIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-49118 <p>The 14th New York Polish Film Festival shows the true face of contemporary Polish cinema. This year the Festival will present seven NYC premieres by young Polish directors.<br /><br />The last two years were exceptional ones for Polish cinema, as demonstrated both by the numerous awards received by Polish films at international film festivals and by the millions of tickets sold within Poland itself. The vitality of Polish cinema is a result of the great diversity of films that are being made. During the NYPFF, audiences can see blockbusters and period pieces, art-house works, movies that engage with social and political issues, and great documentary films.<br /><br />You are invited to discover new films and meet with the actors and directors to discuss what Polish filmmakers have to offer.<br /><br /><strong><em>Please visit our website for the full schedule: www.nypff.com</em></strong></p> Friday, May 04 DOWNTOWN 81 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48956 <p>&ldquo;DOWNTOWN 81 features several no-wave bands (DNA, James White and the Blacks) along with the eclectic funk act Kid Creole and the Coconuts and stars Basquiat as himself; not yet 20 and then better known as a graffiti artist, he checks out of a hospital and into the scene, wandering around Manhattan looking for a place to crash. Originally called NEW YORK BEAT, the movie belongs to an independent film tendency rooted in CBGB documentaries and Super-8 movies of the late 1970s, but its picaresque structure can be traced back to Ron Rice&rsquo;s 1960 beatnik v&eacute;rit&eacute;, THE FLOWER THIEF, which featured the poet and performance artist Taylor Mead as its holy innocent. As Rice&rsquo;s movie preserves a lost San Francisco, so DOWNTOWN 81 documents a vanished New York, although it is a more self-conscious and star-struck work: The vagrant protagonist is redeemed by an encounter with downtown&rsquo;s most glamorous celebrity, Debbie Harry.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, NEW YORK TIMES</p> Friday, May 04 JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT: THE RADIANT CHILD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48958 <p>&ldquo;THE RADIANT CHILD might make you weep (it did me) and might help you better appreciate a painter whose work matters enormously in the history of late-twentieth-century art. It achieves these ends largely though an abundance of footage of its subject at work and with a long interview that Davis videotaped in Los Angeles in 1986, two years before Basquiat&rsquo;s death.&rdquo; &ndash;Amy Taubin, ARTFORUM</p> Friday, May 04 THE NEW YORK POLISH FILM FESTIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-49119 <p>The 14th New York Polish Film Festival shows the true face of contemporary Polish cinema. This year the Festival will present seven NYC premieres by young Polish directors.<br /><br />The last two years were exceptional ones for Polish cinema, as demonstrated both by the numerous awards received by Polish films at international film festivals and by the millions of tickets sold within Poland itself. The vitality of Polish cinema is a result of the great diversity of films that are being made. During the NYPFF, audiences can see blockbusters and period pieces, art-house works, movies that engage with social and political issues, and great documentary films.<br /><br />You are invited to discover new films and meet with the actors and directors to discuss what Polish filmmakers have to offer.<br /><br /><strong><em>Please visit our website for the full schedule: www.nypff.com</em></strong></p> Saturday, May 05 BASQUIAT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48961 <p>A biopic of a major artistic figure of the NYC art scene of the 1980s, made by another major figure of that same moment, BASQUIAT was the directorial debut of painter Julian Schnabel (who would go on to make BEFORE NIGHT FALLS, THE DIVING BELL AND THE BUTTERFLY, and other films). An astute, perceptive, and cinematically inventive film that reveals a great deal both about the artist and his milieu, BASQUIAT is graced with an extraordinary performance from Jeffrey Wright, as well as memorable turns from a truly remarkable lineup of performers, including Gary Oldman, Benicio Del Toro, Dennis Hopper, Courtney Love, Parker Posey, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Walken, and David Bowie, who uncannily channels Andy Warhol.</p> Saturday, May 05 TV PARTY PROGRAM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48964 <p>One of the glories of cable access television, Glenn O&rsquo;Brien&rsquo;s TV PARTY was NYC underground culture&rsquo;s very own talk-show/variety-hour. A fixture on public access Channel D and Channel J from 1972-82, TV PARTY brought a taste of downtown&rsquo;s glamorous, stylish, and creatively teeming club scene into New Yorker&rsquo;s living rooms, and featured visits and performances from the likes of David Bowie, David Byrne, Robert Fripp, the B-52s, Chris Burden, George Clinton, Iggy Pop, James Chance, John Lurie, Klaus Nomi, Kraftwerk, Alex Chilton, Arthur Russell, and many, many others, with writer, editor, and tastemaker O&rsquo;Brien (who wrote the screenplay for DOWNTOWN 81, and who passed away just last year) playing the role of charismatic, droll, and always deadpan host. One repeat visitor was none other than Jean-Michel Basquiat, and this special program features glimpses of several of his appearances, including excerpts from several newly recovered and restored episodes that have not been seen since they originally aired.</p> Saturday, May 05 PERMANENT VACATION http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48966 <p>&ldquo;Jarmusch&rsquo;s first feature is a remarkable time capsule of the landscapes of the Lower East Side circa 1980, and its fashion, culture, and attitude. We follow lanky teenage jazz fiend Allie as he hangs out in his scuzzy tenement flat with girlfriend Leila, and drifts through a crumbling Lower East Side landscape that&rsquo;s half war zone, half deserted playground. Along the way, he reads some French poetry, catches a Nicolas Ray film, steals a car&hellip;and bumps into a variety of morbid eccentrics and glamorous psychotics. Famously, when Jarmusch was filming in a flat on East 3rd Street, the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat took to using the set as a crash-pad. &lsquo;Every time we did a reverse angle, I&rsquo;d have to drag Jean-Michel in his sleeping bag under the camera so he&rsquo;d be out of the shot,&rsquo; reported the director. &lsquo;He&rsquo;d grunt and go back to sleep.&rsquo;&rdquo; &ndash;BARBICAN</p> Saturday, May 05 HARUN FAROKI: PROGRAM 5 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-49130 <p>BEDTIME STORIES 1&ndash;3: CAT STORIES / EINSCHLAFGESCHICHTEN 1-3: KATZENGESCHICHTEN<br />(1977, 9 min, 16mm-to-digital. In German with English subtitles.)<br /><br />AN IMAGE / EIN BILD<br />(1983, 25 min, 16mm. In German with English subtitles.)<br />&ldquo;Four days spent in a studio working on a centerfold photo for Playboy magazine provided the subject matter for my film. The magazine itself deals with culture, cars, a certain lifestyle. Maybe all those trappings are only there to cover up the naked woman. Maybe it&rsquo;s like with a paper-doll. The naked woman in the middle is a sun around which a system revolves: of culture, of business, of living! (It&rsquo;s impossible to either look or film into the sun.) One can well imagine that the people creating such a picture, the gravity of which is supposed to hold all that, perform their task with as much care, seriousness, and responsibility as if they were splitting uranium.&rdquo; &ndash;Harun Farocki<br /><br />A NEW PRODUCT / EIN NEUES PRODUKT<br />(2012, 36 min, digital. In German with English subtitles.)<br />&ldquo;Farocki shows that organizations have found ways and means to speak positively using cynicism; that means, using phrases whose emptiness one not only perceives, but even takes into account. One could speak of a second order cynicism, which entails being cynical about one&rsquo;s own cynicism and gaining a language that communicates that one only trusts it because one doesn&rsquo;t trust it, and knows oneself in this mistrust to be of one mind with all one&rsquo;s counterparts. One could be tempted to extol this as a further case of the social, not entirely conscious refinement of communication, if it were not clear how much it compels the participants into an infantilization, from which they see no escape.&rdquo; &ndash;Dirk Baecker<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Sunday, May 06 THE NEW YORK POLISH FILM FESTIVAL http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-49120 <p>The 14th New York Polish Film Festival shows the true face of contemporary Polish cinema. This year the Festival will present seven NYC premieres by young Polish directors.<br /><br />The last two years were exceptional ones for Polish cinema, as demonstrated both by the numerous awards received by Polish films at international film festivals and by the millions of tickets sold within Poland itself. The vitality of Polish cinema is a result of the great diversity of films that are being made. During the NYPFF, audiences can see blockbusters and period pieces, art-house works, movies that engage with social and political issues, and great documentary films.<br /><br />You are invited to discover new films and meet with the actors and directors to discuss what Polish filmmakers have to offer.<br /><br /><strong><em>Please visit our website for the full schedule: www.nypff.com</em></strong></p> Sunday, May 06 JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT: THE RADIANT CHILD http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48959 <p>&ldquo;THE RADIANT CHILD might make you weep (it did me) and might help you better appreciate a painter whose work matters enormously in the history of late-twentieth-century art. It achieves these ends largely though an abundance of footage of its subject at work and with a long interview that Davis videotaped in Los Angeles in 1986, two years before Basquiat&rsquo;s death.&rdquo; &ndash;Amy Taubin, ARTFORUM</p> Sunday, May 06 WILD STYLE - Charlie Ahearn in person! http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48969 <p>Charlie Ahearn&rsquo;s seminal WILD STYLE is a loosely-scripted narrative film that also functions as an invaluable glimpse into the graffiti and hip hop cultures, showcasing the art and music of legends such as Fab 5 Freddy and graffiti artist Lee Quinones. Its story follows the exploits of maverick tagger Zoro (Quinones), whose work attracts the attention of an East Village art fancier (Patti Astor) who commissions him to paint the stage for a giant Rapper&rsquo;s Convention, and features additional appearances from Grandmaster Flash, Busy Bee, The Cold Crush Brothers, and more.<br /><br /><strong>Charlie Ahearn will be here in person for the screening!</strong></p> Sunday, May 06 SLEEPWALK http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48971 <p>&ldquo;Driver&rsquo;s first feature &ndash; a luminous, oddball comic fantasy about ancient Chinese curses and Xerox machines, set in Manhattan&rsquo;s Chinatown and its immediate environs &ndash; may well be the most visually ravishing American independent film of its year. Set in an irrational, poetic universe that bears a certain relationship to Jacques Rivette&rsquo;s DUELLE, this dreamy intrigue breaks a cardinal rule of fantasy by striking off in a number of directions: an executive barks in the street, a young Frenchwoman (Magnuson) loses her hair, and machines in a copy shop start to purr and wheeze on their own initiative. The moods that are established are delicate, and not everyone will be able to go with them, but Driver sustains them with beauty and eccentric charm.&rdquo; &ndash;Jonathan Rosenbaum, CHICAGO READER</p> Monday, May 07 EC: SONGS 1-14 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48949 <p>&ldquo;SONG 1: Portrait of a lady. SONGS 2 &amp; 3: Fire and a mind&rsquo;s movement in remembering. SONG 4: Three girls playing with a ball. Hand painted. SONG 5: A childbirth song. SONG 6: The painted veil via moth-death. SONG 7: San Francisco. SONG 8: Sea creatures. SONG 9: Wedding source and substance. SONG 10: Sitting around. SONG 11: Fires, windows, an insect, a lyre of rain scratches. SONG 12: Verticals and shadows caught in glass traps. SONG 13: A travel song of scenes and horizontals. SONG 14: Molds, paints and crystals.&rdquo; &ndash;Stan Brakhage</p> Monday, May 07 EC: SONGS 15-22 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48950 <p>&ldquo;SONG 15: FIFTEEN SONG TRAITS: A series of individual portraits of friends and family &ndash; Robert Creeley, Michael McClure, Ed Dorn, Jonas Mekas, others. SONG 16: A flowering of sex as in the mind&rsquo;s eye, a joy. SONGS 17 &amp; 18: The movie house cathedral and a singular room. SONGS 19 &amp; 20: Women dancing and a light. SONGS 21 &amp; 22: Two views of closed-eye vision.&rdquo; &ndash;Stan Brakhage</p> Monday, May 07 SHE’S GOTTA HAVE IT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=05&year=2018#showing-48974 <p>&ldquo;The funniest comedy of summer &lsquo;86. Nola Darling, an earthily charismatic young woman, refuses to be dominated by any man. After a series of &lsquo;dogs&rsquo; (hilariously lampooned in a montage of fatuous opening lines), Nola selects three paramours: Greer, Mars (Lee), and Jamie &ndash; a narcissist, a space shot, and a grim believer in true love. Her independence and their clashing styles combine in comic situations that build into giddy fugues; in one example, a plaintive soliloquy by Jamie morphs into an argument with Mars about basketball and the ugliness of Larry Bird.&rdquo; &ndash;Peter Keough, CHICAGO READER</p> Monday, May 07