Anthology Film Archives - Calendar Events http://anthologyfilmarchives.org An international center for the preservation, study, and exhibition of film and video with a particular focus on American independent and avant-garde cinema and its precursors found in classic European, Soviet and Japanese film. en-us Sun, 04 Dec 2016 09:12:34 -0500 EC: SIDNEY PETERSON PROGRAM http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46712 <p>THE POTTED PSALM and THE PETRIFIED DOG have been preserved by Anthology Film Archives through the Avant-Garde Masters program funded by The Film Foundation and administered by the National Film Preservation Foundation. MR. FRENHOFFER AND THE MINOTAUR and THE LEAD SHOES have been preserved by Anthology with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation.<br /><br />THE POTTED PSALM (1946, 19 min, 16mm)<br />THE PETRIFIED DOG (1948, 19 min, 16mm)<br />MR. FRENHOFFER AND THE MINOTAUR (1949, 21 min, 16mm)<br />THE LEAD SHOES (1949, 17 min, 16mm)<br /><br />&ldquo;These images are meant to play not on our rational senses, but on the infinite universe of ambiguity within us.&rdquo; &ndash;Sidney Peterson<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 80 min.</p> Sunday, December 04 BACKTRACK aka CATCHFIRE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46739 <p>&copy; Dennis Hopper, Courtesy of The Hopper Art Trust. Print courtesy of the Dennis Hopper Collection at the Academy Film Archive.<br /><br />An action movie that bizarrely grafts together mobsters with the conceptual art scene, BACKTRACK is a flawed and goofy movie, but one that boasts what may be the ultimate &lsquo;say what?&rsquo; cast: Dennis Hopper, Jodie Foster, Vincent Price, Joe Pesci (though he did get his name scrubbed from the credits), Fred Ward, John Turturro, Julie Adams, Dean Stockwell, and appearances by Charlie Sheen, Catherine Keener (in her first credited performance), Toni Basil, and Bob Dylan (playing a chainsaw-wielding artist) &ndash; not to mention the central role of Jenny Holzer&rsquo;s artwork. A fraught production that took place during a writers&rsquo; strike (with Alex Cox stepping in during shooting to finesse the script), Hopper purportedly submitted a 3-hour version that was cut to half that length by the distributor and released as CATCHFIRE prompting Hopper to redact his name and use the Alan Smithee moniker. Re-edited and released as the director&rsquo;s cut, BACKTRACK is worthy of a cult following for its absurdity: who other than Dennis Hopper would insert a Jenny Holzer LED piece, &ldquo;Killing is unavoidable but it is nothing to be proud of&rdquo; in the middle of a mob boss&rsquo;s discussion with a hit man? Don&rsquo;t let the plot holes or the unbelievable storyline keep you from enjoying this nutso film, with lines that Hopper doles out like no one else: &ldquo;Fuckin&rsquo; artists&rdquo; and &ldquo;You want to learn a sense of reality, you don&rsquo;t sit in no fuckin&rsquo; Eames chair.&rdquo;</p> Sunday, December 04 LIONEL SOUKAZ: A QUEER AVANT-GARDE PIONEER: PROGRAM 2: RACE D’EP http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46754 <p>In 1979, Soukaz and the philosopher Guy Hocquenghem directed the four-part documentary feature RACE D&rsquo;EP, which was released alongside a book compiling what they considered to be &ldquo;a century of homosexuality in photographs.&rdquo; The movie explores one century of oppression and empowerment of homosexuals through their relationship to representation and images. The section on the 1900s focuses on Wilhelm von Gloeden, the baron who took pictures of young Italians. For the 1930s they pay tribute to the work of Magnus Hirschfeld, whose laboratory for research into gender was destroyed by the Nazis. The third part expresses a critique of the capitalist-inflected manner in which some western homosexuals themselves respond to gay liberation. And the last part, set in the present, depicts a conversation, over the course of one night, between two strangers who meet in a gay bar. As relevant today as when it was made, this film was initially censored by the French Minister of Culture because of its numerous explicit scenes of gay sex. Thanks to the support of many intellectuals, the film was finally released, allowing the first pages of the history of gay and trans people to begin to be told within the cinema.</p> Sunday, December 04 WHITE STAR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46742 <p>Dennis Hopper: &ldquo;The emotionally most demanding film I&rsquo;ve ever made, and therefore the most dangerous one &ndash; for me.&rdquo; BLUE VELVET? In the words of Frank Booth: Fuck that shit. Dennis Hopper gives his most terrifying, unhinged performance as a seedy concert promoter in the virtually unknown, dystopian synthpunk odyssey, WHITE STAR. Hopper plays Kenneth Barlow, the sociopathic Colonel Tom Parker to up-and-coming New Wave artist Moody Mudinsky (aka White Star)&rsquo;s Elvis. Ferociously asserting his credibility &ndash; Barlow claims a part in The Rolling Stones&rsquo; success &ndash; while getting beat up, pissed on, and sold out, Barlow orchestrates a series of increasingly dangerous schemes without Moody&rsquo;s knowledge, culminating in a wretched publicity stunt straight out of a mid-&rsquo;70s Bowie concept album. Watching WHITE STAR, one truly fears for Hopper&rsquo;s fellow performers, as if he&rsquo;ll break role, lash out, and charge through the screen at any moment. The experience of working with Hopper sent his director into early retirement and rural seclusion, where he has remained ever since. What the compromised filmmaking lacks in Klick&rsquo;s typically kinetic style, it makes up for in Hopper&rsquo;s once-in-the-history-of-the-medium performance, which attains a graceful and terrifying state of Pure Cinema.</p> Sunday, December 04 LIONEL SOUKAZ: A QUEER AVANT-GARDE PIONEER: PROGRAM 3: IXE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46757 <p>Following the censorship of RACE D&rsquo;EP, Soukaz rebelled more strongly than ever against any efforts to exert control over his art, or any aspect of his life. Cinematically, his immediate response was IXE. A powerful manifesto proclaiming the freedom to live, and a direct provocation to the censors, IXE encompasses depictions of nearly every imaginable taboo within French society at that time: sodomy, blasphemy, drug use, bestiality, cross-dressing&hellip;. Presented in its original double-screen version, IXE forms an audiovisual explosion of rage, beautifully summed up by philosopher Ren&eacute; Sch&eacute;rer as &ldquo;hopeless vitality.&rdquo;<br /><br />With:<br />TEXAS CHAINSAW POLITICAL MASSACRE (2002, 5 min, Super-8mm)</p> Sunday, December 04 MAD DOG MORGAN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46746 <p>Special thanks to Philippe Mora; Lloyd Kaufman &amp; John Brennan (Troma); and Clyde Folley!<br /><br /><img src="http://www.lloydkaufman.com/img/press/art/1-troma_logo.jpg" alt="" width="54" height="18" /><br /><br />&ldquo;One of the key movies in the birth of the Australian film industry, MAD DOG MORGAN is as wild, free, and untamed as the pioneer Australian settler turned outlaw it celebrates. Dan Morgan was a real-life figure, a desperado who roamed the bush, committing robberies, drinking rum, killing people at the slightest provocation and generally behaving like a maniac. Obviously not just anyone could play the role, so director Philippe Mora brought in the only actor who could embody Morgan&rsquo;s peculiar brand of apeshit craziness: Dennis Hopper. Hopper was dead-on perfect for Morgan but, unfortunately for the sanity of the cast and crew, he was also a committed method actor who insisted on getting into the role by drinking at least as much rum as the real Morgan and carrying loaded weapons everywhere. At one point during the shoot Hopper drunkenly took off in a car to visit the real Morgan&rsquo;s grave. He was picked up in the state of Victoria for drunken driving. When his blood alcohol content was measured he was declared legally dead. His producers got him out of jail but he was forbidden by the court to drive or even to be a passenger in a car in the territory!&rdquo; &ndash;Lars Nilsen<br /><br />[<strong>PLEASE NOTE: The film originally scheduled to screen on these dates - BLOODBATH - became unavailable, so we have replaced it with MAD DOG MORGAN...which we intended to include in the Dennis Hopper retrospective in any case, and initially omitted only because we weren't able to find a print until after going to press!</strong>]<br /><br /><br /></p> Sunday, December 04 BLUE VELVET http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46724 <p>Hopper is at his most manic and astounding as the nitrous oxide huffing Frank Booth. He famously called up Lynch to express his interest in playing the role and proclaimed, &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve got to play this part, David, because I am Frank.&rdquo; The film is unimaginable without Hopper, who is at his career best playing one of cinema&rsquo;s most disturbing villains.<br /><br />&ldquo;Hopper&rsquo;s Frank Booth is a violent, volatile hoodlum, periodically dosing himself with ether to further addle his turbulent unconsciousness, trancing out at the sound of Roy Orbison&rsquo;s haunting &ldquo;In Dreams,&rdquo; and screaming &ldquo;Don't you fucking look at me&rdquo; as though we&rsquo;re supposed to be able to look somewhere else.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, DENNIS HOPPER: FROM METHOD TO MADNESS</p> Monday, December 05 LIONEL SOUKAZ: A QUEER AVANT-GARDE PIONEER: PROGRAM 5 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46762 <p>In October 1979, Soukaz visited New York along with Guy Hocquenghem to present RACE D&rsquo;EP. Their visit coincided with the first National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, and he decided to document it, resulting in his film LA MARCHE GAIE. Jim Hubbard filmed the demonstration that day as well, and more than ten years later, he edited together his footage from the marches in both 1979 and 1987, for the film TWO MARCHES. And they weren&rsquo;t the only filmmakers present: Barbara Hammer was also filming scenes that would become part of the collective film, GREETINGS FROM WASHINGTON, D.C., co-directed by Greta Schiller. This special event will bring together the filmmakers (including Barbara Hammer, who contributed footage to GREETINGS) for screenings of all three films, and a discussion in which they will share their memories of documenting this historic moment.<br /><br />Lionel Soukaz LA MARCHE GAIE (1980, 13 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br />Jim Hubbard TWO MARCHES (1991, 9 min, 16mm)<br />Rob Epstein, Frances Reid, Greta Schiller &amp; Lucy Winer GREETINGS FROM WASHINGTON, D.C. (1981, 28 min, 16mm-to-digital. Screened courtesy of Women Make Movies (www.wmm.com).)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 55 min.<br /><br /><strong><em>Lionel Soukaz, Jim Hubbard, Greta Schiller, and Barbara Hammer in person!</em></strong></p> Monday, December 05 THE AMERICAN DREAMER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46728 <p>Restorated by the Walker Art Center.<br /><br />In 1970, while he was in the midst of cutting his infamous, studio-financed experimental film, THE LAST MOVIE, Dennis Hopper invited photographer, journalist, and filmmaker Lawrence Schiller (who had been responsible for iconic images of Robert F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Bette Davis, Marilyn Monroe, and Muhammad Ali, among others) and actor and screenwriter L.M. Kit Carson (DAVID HOLZMAN&rsquo;S DIARY and PARIS, TEXAS) to make a quasi-documentary portrait of him. Capturing Hopper in all his manic, monomaniacal, drug-fueled, yet inspired glory, the resulting film combines documentary footage, philosophical monologues, and Hopper-devised scenes, resulting in a portrait-of-the-artist that&rsquo;s every bit as wild, indescribable, and thrillingly adventurous as THE LAST MOVIE itself. Hamming for the camera while perpetually occupied with his beard-stroking, guns, or women, this is Hopper at his most performative, intriguing, and wild.</p> Monday, December 05 LIONEL SOUKAZ: A QUEER AVANT-GARDE PIONEER: PROGRAM 4: MAMAN QUE MAN + TINO http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46760 <p>MAMAN QUE MAN is a fictionalization of a specific time in Soukaz&rsquo;s life, a story of leaving home for a new life, the struggle between the craving for new lovers and the love of our parents, intertwined with the tragedy of life: death, betrayal, despair. Soukaz frequently asked his friends to appear in his films, in this case recruiting the playwright Copi. TINO too is about friendship insofar as it&rsquo;s Soukaz&rsquo;s second collaboration with Guy Hocquenghem, who wrote the film and performs in it. TINO also features the American journalist Doug Ireland, who plays a rich American man visiting Europe with his wife, where they meet a young Arab man. The story mirrors that of the emperor Hadrian and his favorite Antino&uuml;s, and forms a subtle critique of contemporary imperialism.<br /><br />MAMAN QUE MAN<br />(1982, 49 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br />&amp;<br />TINO<br />(1986, 27 min, 16mm-to-35mm)</p> Monday, December 05 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46705 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Tuesday, December 06 THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46736 <p>Let&rsquo;s not bury the lead: Dennis Hopper chainsaw battle with Leatherface.<br /><br />In his one-star review, Roger Ebert contrasted TCM2 with its predecessor by singling out the sequel&rsquo;s lack of &ldquo;desire to be taken seriously&rdquo; &ndash; which is basically beside the point. In the intervening dozen years, the 70s horror renaissance had given way to many humorless, bloodless (yet increasingly gory) imitations. Virtually a live-action cartoon, the sequel is a hilarious, irreverent riposte to lesser genre efforts. Caroline Williams gives a game performance as Stretch, an alternative radio DJ who teams up with Amarillo Lt. &lsquo;Lefty&rsquo; Enright (Hopper) to take down the butchering Sawyer boys, including Bill Moseley in his iconic role as Leatherface&rsquo;s plate-headed &lsquo;Nam vet brother Chop Top. The role is a brilliant foil to the presence of Mr. EASY RIDER&rsquo;s disgraced, obsessed cowboy cop &ndash; who basically spends the entire film running around the fringes of the action strapped with three chainsaws &ndash; putting the hippie 60s and comedown 70s homicidally adrift in the yuppie 80s. Lest there be any doubt that Hopper&rsquo;s persona is integral to the blueprint: THE AMERICAN DREAMER co-director L. M. Kit Carson wrote the script.</p> Tuesday, December 06 THE LAST MOVIE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46732 <p>Fresh off the wildly successful EASY RIDER, Hopper was given $850,000 (astoundingly low for a feature film even in 1971) to make THE LAST MOVIE, a project he had been developing for years (the inspiration for the plot came to him while working on the John Wayne western THE SONS OF KATIE ELDER in the early 60s). If Hopper went over budget he&rsquo;d lose both final cut and his financial share of the film. The pressure was on, the drugs were flowing, and the project was doomed.<br /><br />&ldquo;Whatever else it is, THE LAST MOVIE surely remains the most elaborate autocritique ever produced by a Hollywood studio. The success of EASY RIDER allowed Hopper to play out his love-hate relationship with the movie industry on a grand scale &ndash; as a follow up he chose to confound his backers with a doggedly nonlinear, sinuously chaotic string of apparent non sequiturs. Incorporating Universal&rsquo;s planet earth logo as an integral part of the film (while withholding its own title credit for half an hour), THE LAST MOVIE parodied Hollywood westerns, Cassavetes-style naturalism, and counterculture romanticism. Absurd, delirious, confrontational, it was an act of visionary aggression and an ode to failure.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, DENNIS HOPPER: FROM METHOD TO MADNESS</p> Tuesday, December 06 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46706 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, December 07 PETER HUTTON: PROGRAM 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46765 <p>FLORENCE (1975, 7 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />LANDSCAPE (FOR MANON) (1987, 18 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />IN TITAN&rsquo;S GOBLET (1991, 10 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />TIME AND TIDE (2000, 35 min, 16mm, silent)<br />LOOKING AT THE SEA (2001, 15 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />Total running time: ca. 90 min.</p> Wednesday, December 07 BACKTRACK aka CATCHFIRE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46740 <p>&copy; Dennis Hopper, Courtesy of The Hopper Art Trust. Print courtesy of the Dennis Hopper Collection at the Academy Film Archive.<br /><br />An action movie that bizarrely grafts together mobsters with the conceptual art scene, BACKTRACK is a flawed and goofy movie, but one that boasts what may be the ultimate &lsquo;say what?&rsquo; cast: Dennis Hopper, Jodie Foster, Vincent Price, Joe Pesci (though he did get his name scrubbed from the credits), Fred Ward, John Turturro, Julie Adams, Dean Stockwell, and appearances by Charlie Sheen, Catherine Keener (in her first credited performance), Toni Basil, and Bob Dylan (playing a chainsaw-wielding artist) &ndash; not to mention the central role of Jenny Holzer&rsquo;s artwork. A fraught production that took place during a writers&rsquo; strike (with Alex Cox stepping in during shooting to finesse the script), Hopper purportedly submitted a 3-hour version that was cut to half that length by the distributor and released as CATCHFIRE prompting Hopper to redact his name and use the Alan Smithee moniker. Re-edited and released as the director&rsquo;s cut, BACKTRACK is worthy of a cult following for its absurdity: who other than Dennis Hopper would insert a Jenny Holzer LED piece, &ldquo;Killing is unavoidable but it is nothing to be proud of&rdquo; in the middle of a mob boss&rsquo;s discussion with a hit man? Don&rsquo;t let the plot holes or the unbelievable storyline keep you from enjoying this nutso film, with lines that Hopper doles out like no one else: &ldquo;Fuckin&rsquo; artists&rdquo; and &ldquo;You want to learn a sense of reality, you don&rsquo;t sit in no fuckin&rsquo; Eames chair.&rdquo;</p> Thursday, December 08 PETER HUTTON: PROGRAM 2: RE-VISIONS: NEW AFA PRESERVATIONS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46768 <p>All films in this program preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.<br /><br />BOSTON FIRE (1979, 8 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />STUDY OF A RIVER (1996-97, 16 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />NEW YORK PORTRAIT: CHAPTER 1 (1978-79, 16 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />NEW YORK PORTRAIT: CHAPTER 2 (1980-81, 16 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />NEW YORK PORTRAIT: CHAPTER 3 (1990, 15 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Thursday, December 08 PETER HUTTON: PROGRAM 1 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46766 <p>FLORENCE (1975, 7 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />LANDSCAPE (FOR MANON) (1987, 18 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />IN TITAN&rsquo;S GOBLET (1991, 10 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />TIME AND TIDE (2000, 35 min, 16mm, silent)<br />LOOKING AT THE SEA (2001, 15 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />Total running time: ca. 90 min.</p> Thursday, December 08 BLUE VELVET http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46725 <p>Hopper is at his most manic and astounding as the nitrous oxide huffing Frank Booth. He famously called up Lynch to express his interest in playing the role and proclaimed, &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve got to play this part, David, because I am Frank.&rdquo; The film is unimaginable without Hopper, who is at his career best playing one of cinema&rsquo;s most disturbing villains.<br /><br />&ldquo;Hopper&rsquo;s Frank Booth is a violent, volatile hoodlum, periodically dosing himself with ether to further addle his turbulent unconsciousness, trancing out at the sound of Roy Orbison&rsquo;s haunting &ldquo;In Dreams,&rdquo; and screaming &ldquo;Don't you fucking look at me&rdquo; as though we&rsquo;re supposed to be able to look somewhere else.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, DENNIS HOPPER: FROM METHOD TO MADNESS</p> Thursday, December 08 PETER HUTTON: PROGRAM 3 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46771 <p>BUDAPEST PORTRAIT (MEMORIES OF A CITY) (1986, 30 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />LODZ SYMPHONY (1993, 20 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />SKAGAFJORDUR (2004, 33 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Friday, December 09 THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE 2 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46737 <p>Let&rsquo;s not bury the lead: Dennis Hopper chainsaw battle with Leatherface.<br /><br />In his one-star review, Roger Ebert contrasted TCM2 with its predecessor by singling out the sequel&rsquo;s lack of &ldquo;desire to be taken seriously&rdquo; &ndash; which is basically beside the point. In the intervening dozen years, the 70s horror renaissance had given way to many humorless, bloodless (yet increasingly gory) imitations. Virtually a live-action cartoon, the sequel is a hilarious, irreverent riposte to lesser genre efforts. Caroline Williams gives a game performance as Stretch, an alternative radio DJ who teams up with Amarillo Lt. &lsquo;Lefty&rsquo; Enright (Hopper) to take down the butchering Sawyer boys, including Bill Moseley in his iconic role as Leatherface&rsquo;s plate-headed &lsquo;Nam vet brother Chop Top. The role is a brilliant foil to the presence of Mr. EASY RIDER&rsquo;s disgraced, obsessed cowboy cop &ndash; who basically spends the entire film running around the fringes of the action strapped with three chainsaws &ndash; putting the hippie 60s and comedown 70s homicidally adrift in the yuppie 80s. Lest there be any doubt that Hopper&rsquo;s persona is integral to the blueprint: THE AMERICAN DREAMER co-director L. M. Kit Carson wrote the script.</p> Friday, December 09 PETER HUTTON: PROGRAM 4 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46774 <p>IN MARIN COUNTY (1970, 10 min, 16mm)<br />JULY &lsquo;71 IN SAN FRANCISCO, LIVING AT BEACH STREET, WORKING AT CANYON CINEMA, SWIMMING IN THE VALLEY OF THE MOON (1971, 35 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />NEW YORK NEAR SLEEP FOR SASKIA (1972, 10 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />IMAGES OF ASIAN MUSIC (A DIARY FROM LIFE 1973-74) (1974, 29 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Friday, December 09 WHITE STAR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46743 <p>Dennis Hopper: &ldquo;The emotionally most demanding film I&rsquo;ve ever made, and therefore the most dangerous one &ndash; for me.&rdquo; BLUE VELVET? In the words of Frank Booth: Fuck that shit. Dennis Hopper gives his most terrifying, unhinged performance as a seedy concert promoter in the virtually unknown, dystopian synthpunk odyssey, WHITE STAR. Hopper plays Kenneth Barlow, the sociopathic Colonel Tom Parker to up-and-coming New Wave artist Moody Mudinsky (aka White Star)&rsquo;s Elvis. Ferociously asserting his credibility &ndash; Barlow claims a part in The Rolling Stones&rsquo; success &ndash; while getting beat up, pissed on, and sold out, Barlow orchestrates a series of increasingly dangerous schemes without Moody&rsquo;s knowledge, culminating in a wretched publicity stunt straight out of a mid-&rsquo;70s Bowie concept album. Watching WHITE STAR, one truly fears for Hopper&rsquo;s fellow performers, as if he&rsquo;ll break role, lash out, and charge through the screen at any moment. The experience of working with Hopper sent his director into early retirement and rural seclusion, where he has remained ever since. What the compromised filmmaking lacks in Klick&rsquo;s typically kinetic style, it makes up for in Hopper&rsquo;s once-in-the-history-of-the-medium performance, which attains a graceful and terrifying state of Pure Cinema.</p> Friday, December 09 PETER HUTTON: PROGRAM 2: RE-VISIONS: NEW AFA PRESERVATIONS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46769 <p>All films in this program preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.<br /><br />BOSTON FIRE (1979, 8 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />STUDY OF A RIVER (1996-97, 16 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />NEW YORK PORTRAIT: CHAPTER 1 (1978-79, 16 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />NEW YORK PORTRAIT: CHAPTER 2 (1980-81, 16 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />NEW YORK PORTRAIT: CHAPTER 3 (1990, 15 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Saturday, December 10 THE AMERICAN DREAMER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46729 <p>Restorated by the Walker Art Center.<br /><br />In 1970, while he was in the midst of cutting his infamous, studio-financed experimental film, THE LAST MOVIE, Dennis Hopper invited photographer, journalist, and filmmaker Lawrence Schiller (who had been responsible for iconic images of Robert F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Bette Davis, Marilyn Monroe, and Muhammad Ali, among others) and actor and screenwriter L.M. Kit Carson (DAVID HOLZMAN&rsquo;S DIARY and PARIS, TEXAS) to make a quasi-documentary portrait of him. Capturing Hopper in all his manic, monomaniacal, drug-fueled, yet inspired glory, the resulting film combines documentary footage, philosophical monologues, and Hopper-devised scenes, resulting in a portrait-of-the-artist that&rsquo;s every bit as wild, indescribable, and thrillingly adventurous as THE LAST MOVIE itself. Hamming for the camera while perpetually occupied with his beard-stroking, guns, or women, this is Hopper at his most performative, intriguing, and wild.</p> Saturday, December 10 SHOW & TELL: DAÏCHI SAÏTO http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46688 <p>Before turning to experimental cinema, filmmaker Da&iuml;chi Sa&iuml;to was a student of literature and philosophy in the U.S. and of Hindi and Sanskrit in India, and the influence of these interests can be detected throughout his transfixing body of film work. Sa&iuml;to&rsquo;s proclivity for constructing his films out of single frames or clusters of fleeting images, punctuated by black leader, creates an alternation between vision and darkness (and often between sound and silence as well) that suggests both poetic meter and a philosophical contemplation of diametric opposites. And his most recent films, which have found him joining forces with the musicians Malcolm Goldstein and Jason Sharp to create extraordinary inter-layerings of sound and image, achieve a trance-like quality reminiscent of certain forms of Indian music. These collaborations with Goldstein and Sharp in particular are true tours-de-force whose uncannily pulsating rhythms affect the body as much as the eye or ear, and variously suggest the organic mechanisms of breathing, blinking, or the beating of the heart.<br /><br />Originally from Japan, but resident in Montreal for more than a decade, Sa&iuml;to has become a force to be reckoned with since turning to avant-garde cinema, not only as a filmmaker but also as a curator, a teacher, an author (his first book, &ldquo;Moving the Sleeping Images of Things Towards the Light,&rdquo; was published in 2013), and as the co-founder of Montreal artist collective Double Negative, through which he has helped to trigger a renewed interest in celluloid in the city&rsquo;s filmmaking community. Sa&iuml;to himself is deeply committed to working on film, and this not-to-be-missed program will include work in Super-8mm, 16mm (both single and dual projection), and 35mm.<br /><br />&ldquo;Whether in the cinema or the gallery, his every work seems to aspire toward a singular plane of expression wherein the unstable material reality of the celluloid image (Sa&iuml;to works variously in 8mm, 16mm, and 35mm, but always on film) meets Sa&iuml;to&rsquo;s intricate conceptual designs, which often advance along musical-mathematical coordinates.&rdquo; &ndash;Jordan Cronk, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />BLIND ALLEY AUGURY (2006, 3 min, Super-8mm, silent)<br />GREEN FUSE (2008, 3 min, Super-8mm, silent)<br />CHIASMUS (2003, 8 min, 16mm, b&amp;w)<br />CHASMIC DANCE (2004, 6 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />ALL THAT RISES (2007, 7 min, 16mm. Sound: Malcolm Goldstein.)<br />TREES OF SYNTAX, LEAVES OF AXIS (2009, 10 min, 35mm. Sound: Malcolm Goldstein.)<br />NEVER A FOOT TOO FAR, EVEN (2012, 14 min, 16mm dual projection. Sound: Malcolm Goldstein.)<br />ENGRAM OF RETURNING (2015, 19 min, 35mm. Sound: Jason Sharp.)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 75 min.</p> Saturday, December 10 THE LAST MOVIE http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46733 <p>Fresh off the wildly successful EASY RIDER, Hopper was given $850,000 (astoundingly low for a feature film even in 1971) to make THE LAST MOVIE, a project he had been developing for years (the inspiration for the plot came to him while working on the John Wayne western THE SONS OF KATIE ELDER in the early 60s). If Hopper went over budget he&rsquo;d lose both final cut and his financial share of the film. The pressure was on, the drugs were flowing, and the project was doomed.<br /><br />&ldquo;Whatever else it is, THE LAST MOVIE surely remains the most elaborate autocritique ever produced by a Hollywood studio. The success of EASY RIDER allowed Hopper to play out his love-hate relationship with the movie industry on a grand scale &ndash; as a follow up he chose to confound his backers with a doggedly nonlinear, sinuously chaotic string of apparent non sequiturs. Incorporating Universal&rsquo;s planet earth logo as an integral part of the film (while withholding its own title credit for half an hour), THE LAST MOVIE parodied Hollywood westerns, Cassavetes-style naturalism, and counterculture romanticism. Absurd, delirious, confrontational, it was an act of visionary aggression and an ode to failure.&rdquo; &ndash;J. Hoberman, DENNIS HOPPER: FROM METHOD TO MADNESS</p> Saturday, December 10 EC: MOTHER http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46713 <p>(MAT)<br /><br />Based on the novel by Maxim Gorky.<br /><br />With the simple theme of a working-class mother growing in political consciousness through participation in revolutionary activity, this film established Pudovkin as one of the major figures of the Soviet cinema. A student of Kuleshov and an admirer of Griffith&rsquo;s films, he was writing his first book of film theory at the same time he was making MOTHER. His expert cutting on movement and his associated editing of unrelated scenes to form what he called a &ldquo;plastic synthesis&rdquo; are amply demonstrated here. Although in direct opposition to Eisenstein&rsquo;s shock montage, Pudovkin used a linkage method advanced far beyond Kuleshov&rsquo;s theories.</p> Sunday, December 11 PETER HUTTON: PROGRAM 5: SCREENING ROOM WITH PETER HUTTON http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46777 <p>In March of 1977, Hutton appeared on SCREENING ROOM, the invaluable TV series hosted by filmmaker Robert Gardner that featured interviews with many of the key figures in the worlds of experimental film, documentary, and animation. During this episode, Hutton screens and discusses excerpts from JULY &lsquo;71 IN SAN FRANCISCO&hellip;, IMAGES OF ASIAN MUSIC, FLORENCE, and NEW YORK NEAR SLEEP FOR SASKIA.</p> Sunday, December 11 WHITE STAR http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46744 <p>Dennis Hopper: &ldquo;The emotionally most demanding film I&rsquo;ve ever made, and therefore the most dangerous one &ndash; for me.&rdquo; BLUE VELVET? In the words of Frank Booth: Fuck that shit. Dennis Hopper gives his most terrifying, unhinged performance as a seedy concert promoter in the virtually unknown, dystopian synthpunk odyssey, WHITE STAR. Hopper plays Kenneth Barlow, the sociopathic Colonel Tom Parker to up-and-coming New Wave artist Moody Mudinsky (aka White Star)&rsquo;s Elvis. Ferociously asserting his credibility &ndash; Barlow claims a part in The Rolling Stones&rsquo; success &ndash; while getting beat up, pissed on, and sold out, Barlow orchestrates a series of increasingly dangerous schemes without Moody&rsquo;s knowledge, culminating in a wretched publicity stunt straight out of a mid-&rsquo;70s Bowie concept album. Watching WHITE STAR, one truly fears for Hopper&rsquo;s fellow performers, as if he&rsquo;ll break role, lash out, and charge through the screen at any moment. The experience of working with Hopper sent his director into early retirement and rural seclusion, where he has remained ever since. What the compromised filmmaking lacks in Klick&rsquo;s typically kinetic style, it makes up for in Hopper&rsquo;s once-in-the-history-of-the-medium performance, which attains a graceful and terrifying state of Pure Cinema.</p> Sunday, December 11 PETER HUTTON: PROGRAM 4 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46775 <p>IN MARIN COUNTY (1970, 10 min, 16mm)<br />JULY &lsquo;71 IN SAN FRANCISCO, LIVING AT BEACH STREET, WORKING AT CANYON CINEMA, SWIMMING IN THE VALLEY OF THE MOON (1971, 35 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />NEW YORK NEAR SLEEP FOR SASKIA (1972, 10 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />IMAGES OF ASIAN MUSIC (A DIARY FROM LIFE 1973-74) (1974, 29 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Sunday, December 11 MAD DOG MORGAN http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46747 <p>Special thanks to Philippe Mora; Lloyd Kaufman &amp; John Brennan (Troma); and Clyde Folley!<br /><br /><img src="http://www.lloydkaufman.com/img/press/art/1-troma_logo.jpg" alt="" width="54" height="18" /><br /><br />&ldquo;One of the key movies in the birth of the Australian film industry, MAD DOG MORGAN is as wild, free, and untamed as the pioneer Australian settler turned outlaw it celebrates. Dan Morgan was a real-life figure, a desperado who roamed the bush, committing robberies, drinking rum, killing people at the slightest provocation and generally behaving like a maniac. Obviously not just anyone could play the role, so director Philippe Mora brought in the only actor who could embody Morgan&rsquo;s peculiar brand of apeshit craziness: Dennis Hopper. Hopper was dead-on perfect for Morgan but, unfortunately for the sanity of the cast and crew, he was also a committed method actor who insisted on getting into the role by drinking at least as much rum as the real Morgan and carrying loaded weapons everywhere. At one point during the shoot Hopper drunkenly took off in a car to visit the real Morgan&rsquo;s grave. He was picked up in the state of Victoria for drunken driving. When his blood alcohol content was measured he was declared legally dead. His producers got him out of jail but he was forbidden by the court to drive or even to be a passenger in a car in the territory!&rdquo; &ndash;Lars Nilsen<br /><br />[<strong>PLEASE NOTE: The film originally scheduled to screen on these dates - BLOODBATH - became unavailable, so we have replaced it with MAD DOG MORGAN...which we intended to include in the Dennis Hopper retrospective in any case, and initially omitted only because we weren't able to find a print until after going to press!</strong>]<br /><br /><br /></p> Sunday, December 11 FLAHERTY NYC: WILD SOUNDS, PROGRAM 6: TALK BACK http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46686 <p><strong><em>Cauleen Smith in person.<br /><br /></em></strong>From cacophony, a clarity? Voices double back or search for a method of address in this concluding, contradictory program. In some of Anne Charlotte Robertson&rsquo;s diary films she records a second, more distanced, narration on top of (and sometimes contradicting) the more manic narration that she recorded at the time of filming. In Cauleen Smith&rsquo;s CHRONICLES OF A LYING SPIRIT, the voice of her alter-ego Kelly Gabron narrates her own story, countering the voice of a &lsquo;classical&rsquo; male narrator. The other films in this program (including the world premiere of a newly finished &ldquo;Kelly Gabron&rdquo; film, Mounira Al-Solh&rsquo;s RAWANE&rsquo;S SONG, and Lucy Clout&rsquo;s THE EXTRA&rsquo;S EVER-MOVING LIPS) play out variations on attempts to find or read voices, culminating in Smith&rsquo;s ENTITLED, where the artist takes up one-sided, but pointed and playful, correspondences with Great Dead White Male still life painters, creating new hypothetical futures.<br /><br />Anne Charlotte Robertson FIVE YEAR DIARY, REEL 23: A BREAKDOWN AND AFTER THE MENTAL HOSPITAL (1982, 26 min, video)<br />Anne Charlotte Robertson FIVE YEAR DIARY, REEL 26: FIRST SEMESTER GRAD SCHOOL (1983, 22 min, video)<br />Cauleen Smith CHRONICLES OF A LYING SPIRIT (BY KELLY GABRON) (1992, 7 min, digital)<br />Mounira Al-Solh RAWANE&rsquo;S SONG (2006, 7 min, digital)<br />Lucy Clout THE EXTRA&rsquo;S EVER-MOVING LIPS (2014, 8 min, digital)<br />Cauleen Smith SINE AT THE CANYON &amp; SINE AT THE SEA (BY KELLY GABRON) (2010/2016, 5 min, digital)<br />Cauleen Smith ENTITLED (2008, 7 min, video)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Monday, December 12 PETER HUTTON: PROGRAM 3 http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46772 <p>BUDAPEST PORTRAIT (MEMORIES OF A CITY) (1986, 30 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />LODZ SYMPHONY (1993, 20 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />SKAGAFJORDUR (2004, 33 min, 16mm, b&amp;w, silent)<br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Monday, December 12 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46707 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Tuesday, December 13 AFA MEMBERS ONLY: TARZAN AND JANE REGAINED…SORT OF http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46690 <p>AFA MEMBERS ONLY &ndash; FREE SCREENING!<br /><br />Once every calendar we offer a special, AFA Members Only screening, featuring sneak-previews of upcoming features, programs of rare materials from Anthology&rsquo;s collections, in-person filmmaker presentations, and more! The benefits of an Anthology membership have always been plentiful: free admission to over 100 Essential Cinema programs, reduced admission to all other shows, discounted AFA publications. But with these screenings &ndash; free and open only to members &ndash; we sweeten the pot even further.<br /><br />For this quarter&rsquo;s Members Only event, we follow up our Dennis Hopper series with a screening of Andy Warhol&rsquo;s TARZAN AND JANE REGAINED&hellip;SORT OF, which finds Hopper sharing screen time with Taylor Mead!<br /><br />&ldquo;Andy Warhol goes Hollywood&hellip;sort of. Warhol made his first sound film during a sojourn in Los Angeles in 1963. Along with leading players Taylor Mead and Naomi Levine, plus Dennis Hopper and a cavalcade of art stars including Claes and Pat Oldenburg and Wallace Berman (and his son Tosh), Warhol spent two weeks exploring the city, shooting (in black-and-white and color) everywhere from Berman&rsquo;s studio to the Beverly Hills Hotel to an unglamorous stretch of freeway. Jane swims naked in Virginia Dwan&rsquo;s pool, Tarzan hunts for coconuts in the local palms, and the Watts Towers become an unlikely backdrop for an Edenic idyll.&rdquo; &ndash;Juliet Clark<br /><br /><strong>Reception at 7:00!</strong></p> Tuesday, December 13 NEWFILMMAKERS http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46708 <p>For full program listings, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newfilmmakers.com" target="_blank">www.newfilmmakers.com</a>.</p> Wednesday, December 14 NOTES FROM THE BASEMENT http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46695 <p>(AUFZEICHNUNGEN AUS DEM TIEFPARTERRE)<br /><br />A radical look into the mind of the &lsquo;man on the street.&rsquo; Peter Haindl, a hospital orderly in Vienna, shot these home movies from 1993 to 1999. They were then given to Frimmel, who created this 90-minute compilation.<br /><br />&ldquo;While striking various poses around his apartment, [Haindl] addresses an imaginary public, his speeches ranging from defiant to contrite. Each one shows a different side of his personality, from political grumbler to poet in a slouch hat. His monologues deal with the usual prejudices, such as those against women and foreigners, and none of them can be reduced to a single coherent point of view. Commonplaces are qualified with contradictions and self-irony, and his tirades occasionally swerve in the direction of serious analysis. The state of pandemonium which characterizes the Austrian soul is depicted as a labyrinth of rhetoric.&rdquo; &ndash;Dominik Kamalzadeh</p> Thursday, December 15 BEAVIS AND BUTT-HEAD DO AMERICA http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46692 <p>20TH ANNIVERSARY SCREENING!<br /><br />With the voices of Mike Judge, Demi Moore, Bruce Willis, Robert Stack, Cloris Leachman, and David Letterman.<br /><br />Join Anthology as we celebrate the 20th anniversary of Beavis and Butt-head&rsquo;s one and only appearance on the big screen! In this prescient portrait of pre-9/11 America, Beavis and Butt-head set out in search of their stolen television only to get obliviously entangled in a cross-country domestic terrorism pursuit, thereby becoming America&rsquo;s &ldquo;most wanted.&rdquo; In Judge&rsquo;s masterpiece, his dynamic duo truly &ldquo;do America,&rdquo; their adventures comprising not only one of the most riotously funny films of the 1990s, but also amounting to a genuinely sharp-edged cultural critique, complete with a mind-scrambling psychedelic sequence. Today BEAVIS AND BUTT-HEAD DO AMERICA plays better than ever, especially in the immaculately beautiful print we&rsquo;ll be presenting on these two evenings (20 years to the day after its gala premiere and subsequent theatrical release). Long live Beavis and Butt-head!<br /><br />&ldquo;To study B&amp;B is to learn about a culture of narcissism, alienation, functional illiteracy, instant gratification, and television zombiehood. Those who deplore Beavis and Butt-Head are confusing the messengers with the message.&rdquo; &ndash;Roger Ebert</p> Thursday, December 15 PAUL SWAN + CONFESSIONS OF A SOCIOPATH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46698 <p>Andy Warhol<br />PAUL SWAN<br />(1965, 66 min, 16mm)<br />PAUL SWAN is Warhol&rsquo;s documentary portrait of the early 20th century American dancer who pioneered &lsquo;aesthetic,&rsquo; interpretive forms of modern dance. The elderly Swan recreates past dance performances, reciting poetry for the camera, frequently changing costumes, and leaving the stage empty for long periods while he hunts for a lost shoe.<br /><br />&amp;<br /><br />Joe Gibbons<br />CONFESSIONS OF A SOCIOPATH<br />(2001, 40 min, video)<br />With a nod to Samuel Beckett&rsquo;s KRAPP&rsquo;S LAST TAPE, Gibbons lets the cat out of the bag with a critical self-diagnosis that is as characteristically funny as it is worrisome. Included in the year&rsquo;s best list by both FILM COMMENT and ARTFORUM, this magnum opus interweaves footage from over 25 years of filmmaking activity into an expertly realized, truly unforgettable piece that is undoubtedly one of Gibbons&rsquo;s most significant achievements.</p> Thursday, December 15 SHORT STAY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46668 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Special thanks to Graham Swon.<br /><br />Cinematic renaissance man Ted Fendt &ndash; filmmaker, projectionist, translator, and scholar (he recently edited the Austrian Filmmuseum monograph on Straub &amp; Huillet) &ndash; has over the last few years quietly made a name for himself among cognoscenti with a small body of short films. Intentionally (and hilariously) anti-dramatic and uneventful, they seem almost by definition to stand in opposition to a feature-film sensibility. Nevertheless, Fendt&rsquo;s first feature (albeit just barely north of one hour) has arrived, and by some miracle it sustains its running time without sacrificing the perversely minor-key recessiveness of the short films.<br /><br />The aptly titled SHORT STAY finds Fendt continuing to mine his home turf &ndash; the unspectacular environs of suburban Philadelphia, where he grew up &ndash; though this time he (and his protagonist) expand their purview to the neighboring metropolis itself. The film centers on Mike, a socially awkward, directionless young man, who finds himself temporarily moving to the city to take over an acquaintance&rsquo;s free walking tour &lsquo;business&rsquo; while he&rsquo;s away. SHORT STAY reflects its protagonist&rsquo;s uninflected, seemingly imperturbable affectlessness, but with a formal precision and a preoccupation with gesture and manner rather than psychology that, for all the film&rsquo;s deadpan comedy, brings it much closer to Straub/Huillet or Rohmer territory than mumblecore (a dimension that&rsquo;s only underlined by Fendt&rsquo;s commitment to shooting &ndash; and exhibiting &ndash; his films on 16mm or 35mm). The animating mystery of SHORT STAY is to what degree Mike possesses self-awareness, and it&rsquo;s a mystery that, to its great credit, the film declines to resolve, allowing Mike to keep his inner life to himself and remain an enigma rather than an object of pity or scorn.<br /><br />For this week-long premiere run, we&rsquo;ll be presenting SHORT STAY alongside the three short films that preceded it, for a de facto Ted Fendt mid-career retrospective!<br /><br />&ldquo;Fendt renders [his] incidents&hellip;with a deliberation, assurance, and sensitivity to forms of everyday inconsideration that evidence his status as an unapologetic formalist, sly humorist, and unlikely moralist. SHORT STAY manages to contain multitudes despite initially seeming unassuming and sparse&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Dan Sullivan, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />Plus:<br />BROKEN SPECS (2012, 6 min, Super-16mm-to-35mm)<br />TRAVEL PLANS (2013, 7 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br />GOING OUT (2015, 8 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Friday, December 16 THE DUMB GIRL OF PORTICI http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46664 <p>RESTORATION PREMIERE!<br /><br />With Anna Pavlova. Distributed by Milestone Films.<br /><br />Following on the heels of our series, &ldquo;Woman with a Movie Camera,&rdquo; which included a program devoted to Lois Weber, the most successful female filmmaker of her time, we&rsquo;re thrilled to host the NYC premiere of the newly-restored THE DUMB GIRL OF PORTICI. Just in time for its 100th anniversary, Weber&rsquo;s extravaganza is being re-released thanks to the combined efforts of the Library of Congress and Milestone Films (who are also re-releasing Weber&rsquo;s SHOES).<br /><br />One of Universal&rsquo;s most lavish and ambitious films to date, and a landmark in women&rsquo;s cinema, PORTICI is also remarkable as perhaps the most important filmic showcase for famed ballet dancer and choreographer Anna Pavlova. A Russian émigré resident in London, the dancer was &ldquo;stuck&rdquo; in America as WWI raged. Pavlova was currently appearing with the Boston Opera Company in D.F.E. Auber&rsquo;s 1829 &ldquo;La Muette de Portici,&rdquo; portraying Fenella, a mute fisher-girl living during the Spanish occupation of Naples in the mid-17th century. In order to save the almost-bankrupt Boston Opera Company, Pavlova agreed to portray Fenella in Weber&rsquo;s film, and the result was the most extraordinary document of Pavlova on celluloid.<br /><br />Sadly, over the years PORTICI has fallen out of distribution. But that is about to change: utilizing the only prints known to have survived, the Library of Congress archivists George Willeman and Valerie Cervantes have brought the film to a form closer to the original than has been seen in decades, while further restoration by An Affair With Film&rsquo;s Lori Raskin has resulted in the stabilization of the restoration and the addition of the original tinting. Thanks to these efforts, projection at the proper film speed, and a dazzling new score by dance composer Jonathan Sweeney, THE DUMB GIRL OF PORTICI and prima ballerina Anna Pavlova are poised to delight audiences all over again. <br /><br />&ldquo;Pavlova&rsquo;s artistry is something that we are often asked to take on faith, something where you had to be there. Watching THE DUMB GIRL OF PORTICI, you are there.&rdquo; &ndash; Joan Acocella, NEW YORKER</p> Friday, December 16 SHORT STAY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46669 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Special thanks to Graham Swon.<br /><br />Cinematic renaissance man Ted Fendt &ndash; filmmaker, projectionist, translator, and scholar (he recently edited the Austrian Filmmuseum monograph on Straub &amp; Huillet) &ndash; has over the last few years quietly made a name for himself among cognoscenti with a small body of short films. Intentionally (and hilariously) anti-dramatic and uneventful, they seem almost by definition to stand in opposition to a feature-film sensibility. Nevertheless, Fendt&rsquo;s first feature (albeit just barely north of one hour) has arrived, and by some miracle it sustains its running time without sacrificing the perversely minor-key recessiveness of the short films.<br /><br />The aptly titled SHORT STAY finds Fendt continuing to mine his home turf &ndash; the unspectacular environs of suburban Philadelphia, where he grew up &ndash; though this time he (and his protagonist) expand their purview to the neighboring metropolis itself. The film centers on Mike, a socially awkward, directionless young man, who finds himself temporarily moving to the city to take over an acquaintance&rsquo;s free walking tour &lsquo;business&rsquo; while he&rsquo;s away. SHORT STAY reflects its protagonist&rsquo;s uninflected, seemingly imperturbable affectlessness, but with a formal precision and a preoccupation with gesture and manner rather than psychology that, for all the film&rsquo;s deadpan comedy, brings it much closer to Straub/Huillet or Rohmer territory than mumblecore (a dimension that&rsquo;s only underlined by Fendt&rsquo;s commitment to shooting &ndash; and exhibiting &ndash; his films on 16mm or 35mm). The animating mystery of SHORT STAY is to what degree Mike possesses self-awareness, and it&rsquo;s a mystery that, to its great credit, the film declines to resolve, allowing Mike to keep his inner life to himself and remain an enigma rather than an object of pity or scorn.<br /><br />For this week-long premiere run, we&rsquo;ll be presenting SHORT STAY alongside the three short films that preceded it, for a de facto Ted Fendt mid-career retrospective!<br /><br />&ldquo;Fendt renders [his] incidents&hellip;with a deliberation, assurance, and sensitivity to forms of everyday inconsideration that evidence his status as an unapologetic formalist, sly humorist, and unlikely moralist. SHORT STAY manages to contain multitudes despite initially seeming unassuming and sparse&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Dan Sullivan, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />Plus:<br />BROKEN SPECS (2012, 6 min, Super-16mm-to-35mm)<br />TRAVEL PLANS (2013, 7 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br />GOING OUT (2015, 8 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Friday, December 16 PAUL SWAN + CONFESSIONS OF A SOCIOPATH http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46699 <p>Andy Warhol<br />PAUL SWAN<br />(1965, 66 min, 16mm)<br />PAUL SWAN is Warhol&rsquo;s documentary portrait of the early 20th century American dancer who pioneered &lsquo;aesthetic,&rsquo; interpretive forms of modern dance. The elderly Swan recreates past dance performances, reciting poetry for the camera, frequently changing costumes, and leaving the stage empty for long periods while he hunts for a lost shoe.<br /><br />&amp;<br /><br />Joe Gibbons<br />CONFESSIONS OF A SOCIOPATH<br />(2001, 40 min, video)<br />With a nod to Samuel Beckett&rsquo;s KRAPP&rsquo;S LAST TAPE, Gibbons lets the cat out of the bag with a critical self-diagnosis that is as characteristically funny as it is worrisome. Included in the year&rsquo;s best list by both FILM COMMENT and ARTFORUM, this magnum opus interweaves footage from over 25 years of filmmaking activity into an expertly realized, truly unforgettable piece that is undoubtedly one of Gibbons&rsquo;s most significant achievements.</p> Saturday, December 17 SHORT STAY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46670 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Special thanks to Graham Swon.<br /><br />Cinematic renaissance man Ted Fendt &ndash; filmmaker, projectionist, translator, and scholar (he recently edited the Austrian Filmmuseum monograph on Straub &amp; Huillet) &ndash; has over the last few years quietly made a name for himself among cognoscenti with a small body of short films. Intentionally (and hilariously) anti-dramatic and uneventful, they seem almost by definition to stand in opposition to a feature-film sensibility. Nevertheless, Fendt&rsquo;s first feature (albeit just barely north of one hour) has arrived, and by some miracle it sustains its running time without sacrificing the perversely minor-key recessiveness of the short films.<br /><br />The aptly titled SHORT STAY finds Fendt continuing to mine his home turf &ndash; the unspectacular environs of suburban Philadelphia, where he grew up &ndash; though this time he (and his protagonist) expand their purview to the neighboring metropolis itself. The film centers on Mike, a socially awkward, directionless young man, who finds himself temporarily moving to the city to take over an acquaintance&rsquo;s free walking tour &lsquo;business&rsquo; while he&rsquo;s away. SHORT STAY reflects its protagonist&rsquo;s uninflected, seemingly imperturbable affectlessness, but with a formal precision and a preoccupation with gesture and manner rather than psychology that, for all the film&rsquo;s deadpan comedy, brings it much closer to Straub/Huillet or Rohmer territory than mumblecore (a dimension that&rsquo;s only underlined by Fendt&rsquo;s commitment to shooting &ndash; and exhibiting &ndash; his films on 16mm or 35mm). The animating mystery of SHORT STAY is to what degree Mike possesses self-awareness, and it&rsquo;s a mystery that, to its great credit, the film declines to resolve, allowing Mike to keep his inner life to himself and remain an enigma rather than an object of pity or scorn.<br /><br />For this week-long premiere run, we&rsquo;ll be presenting SHORT STAY alongside the three short films that preceded it, for a de facto Ted Fendt mid-career retrospective!<br /><br />&ldquo;Fendt renders [his] incidents&hellip;with a deliberation, assurance, and sensitivity to forms of everyday inconsideration that evidence his status as an unapologetic formalist, sly humorist, and unlikely moralist. SHORT STAY manages to contain multitudes despite initially seeming unassuming and sparse&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Dan Sullivan, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />Plus:<br />BROKEN SPECS (2012, 6 min, Super-16mm-to-35mm)<br />TRAVEL PLANS (2013, 7 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br />GOING OUT (2015, 8 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Saturday, December 17 SHORT STAY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46671 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Special thanks to Graham Swon.<br /><br />Cinematic renaissance man Ted Fendt &ndash; filmmaker, projectionist, translator, and scholar (he recently edited the Austrian Filmmuseum monograph on Straub &amp; Huillet) &ndash; has over the last few years quietly made a name for himself among cognoscenti with a small body of short films. Intentionally (and hilariously) anti-dramatic and uneventful, they seem almost by definition to stand in opposition to a feature-film sensibility. Nevertheless, Fendt&rsquo;s first feature (albeit just barely north of one hour) has arrived, and by some miracle it sustains its running time without sacrificing the perversely minor-key recessiveness of the short films.<br /><br />The aptly titled SHORT STAY finds Fendt continuing to mine his home turf &ndash; the unspectacular environs of suburban Philadelphia, where he grew up &ndash; though this time he (and his protagonist) expand their purview to the neighboring metropolis itself. The film centers on Mike, a socially awkward, directionless young man, who finds himself temporarily moving to the city to take over an acquaintance&rsquo;s free walking tour &lsquo;business&rsquo; while he&rsquo;s away. SHORT STAY reflects its protagonist&rsquo;s uninflected, seemingly imperturbable affectlessness, but with a formal precision and a preoccupation with gesture and manner rather than psychology that, for all the film&rsquo;s deadpan comedy, brings it much closer to Straub/Huillet or Rohmer territory than mumblecore (a dimension that&rsquo;s only underlined by Fendt&rsquo;s commitment to shooting &ndash; and exhibiting &ndash; his films on 16mm or 35mm). The animating mystery of SHORT STAY is to what degree Mike possesses self-awareness, and it&rsquo;s a mystery that, to its great credit, the film declines to resolve, allowing Mike to keep his inner life to himself and remain an enigma rather than an object of pity or scorn.<br /><br />For this week-long premiere run, we&rsquo;ll be presenting SHORT STAY alongside the three short films that preceded it, for a de facto Ted Fendt mid-career retrospective!<br /><br />&ldquo;Fendt renders [his] incidents&hellip;with a deliberation, assurance, and sensitivity to forms of everyday inconsideration that evidence his status as an unapologetic formalist, sly humorist, and unlikely moralist. SHORT STAY manages to contain multitudes despite initially seeming unassuming and sparse&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Dan Sullivan, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />Plus:<br />BROKEN SPECS (2012, 6 min, Super-16mm-to-35mm)<br />TRAVEL PLANS (2013, 7 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br />GOING OUT (2015, 8 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Saturday, December 17 THE DUMB GIRL OF PORTICI http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46665 <p>RESTORATION PREMIERE!<br /><br />With Anna Pavlova. Distributed by Milestone Films.<br /><br />Following on the heels of our series, &ldquo;Woman with a Movie Camera,&rdquo; which included a program devoted to Lois Weber, the most successful female filmmaker of her time, we&rsquo;re thrilled to host the NYC premiere of the newly-restored THE DUMB GIRL OF PORTICI. Just in time for its 100th anniversary, Weber&rsquo;s extravaganza is being re-released thanks to the combined efforts of the Library of Congress and Milestone Films (who are also re-releasing Weber&rsquo;s SHOES).<br /><br />One of Universal&rsquo;s most lavish and ambitious films to date, and a landmark in women&rsquo;s cinema, PORTICI is also remarkable as perhaps the most important filmic showcase for famed ballet dancer and choreographer Anna Pavlova. A Russian émigré resident in London, the dancer was &ldquo;stuck&rdquo; in America as WWI raged. Pavlova was currently appearing with the Boston Opera Company in D.F.E. Auber&rsquo;s 1829 &ldquo;La Muette de Portici,&rdquo; portraying Fenella, a mute fisher-girl living during the Spanish occupation of Naples in the mid-17th century. In order to save the almost-bankrupt Boston Opera Company, Pavlova agreed to portray Fenella in Weber&rsquo;s film, and the result was the most extraordinary document of Pavlova on celluloid.<br /><br />Sadly, over the years PORTICI has fallen out of distribution. But that is about to change: utilizing the only prints known to have survived, the Library of Congress archivists George Willeman and Valerie Cervantes have brought the film to a form closer to the original than has been seen in decades, while further restoration by An Affair With Film&rsquo;s Lori Raskin has resulted in the stabilization of the restoration and the addition of the original tinting. Thanks to these efforts, projection at the proper film speed, and a dazzling new score by dance composer Jonathan Sweeney, THE DUMB GIRL OF PORTICI and prima ballerina Anna Pavlova are poised to delight audiences all over again. <br /><br />&ldquo;Pavlova&rsquo;s artistry is something that we are often asked to take on faith, something where you had to be there. Watching THE DUMB GIRL OF PORTICI, you are there.&rdquo; &ndash; Joan Acocella, NEW YORKER</p> Saturday, December 17 SHORT STAY http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/calendar?view=list&month=12&year=2016#showing-46672 <p>U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON!<br /><br />Special thanks to Graham Swon.<br /><br />Cinematic renaissance man Ted Fendt &ndash; filmmaker, projectionist, translator, and scholar (he recently edited the Austrian Filmmuseum monograph on Straub &amp; Huillet) &ndash; has over the last few years quietly made a name for himself among cognoscenti with a small body of short films. Intentionally (and hilariously) anti-dramatic and uneventful, they seem almost by definition to stand in opposition to a feature-film sensibility. Nevertheless, Fendt&rsquo;s first feature (albeit just barely north of one hour) has arrived, and by some miracle it sustains its running time without sacrificing the perversely minor-key recessiveness of the short films.<br /><br />The aptly titled SHORT STAY finds Fendt continuing to mine his home turf &ndash; the unspectacular environs of suburban Philadelphia, where he grew up &ndash; though this time he (and his protagonist) expand their purview to the neighboring metropolis itself. The film centers on Mike, a socially awkward, directionless young man, who finds himself temporarily moving to the city to take over an acquaintance&rsquo;s free walking tour &lsquo;business&rsquo; while he&rsquo;s away. SHORT STAY reflects its protagonist&rsquo;s uninflected, seemingly imperturbable affectlessness, but with a formal precision and a preoccupation with gesture and manner rather than psychology that, for all the film&rsquo;s deadpan comedy, brings it much closer to Straub/Huillet or Rohmer territory than mumblecore (a dimension that&rsquo;s only underlined by Fendt&rsquo;s commitment to shooting &ndash; and exhibiting &ndash; his films on 16mm or 35mm). The animating mystery of SHORT STAY is to what degree Mike possesses self-awareness, and it&rsquo;s a mystery that, to its great credit, the film declines to resolve, allowing Mike to keep his inner life to himself and remain an enigma rather than an object of pity or scorn.<br /><br />For this week-long premiere run, we&rsquo;ll be presenting SHORT STAY alongside the three short films that preceded it, for a de facto Ted Fendt mid-career retrospective!<br /><br />&ldquo;Fendt renders [his] incidents&hellip;with a deliberation, assurance, and sensitivity to forms of everyday inconsideration that evidence his status as an unapologetic formalist, sly humorist, and unlikely moralist. SHORT STAY manages to contain multitudes despite initially seeming unassuming and sparse&hellip;.&rdquo; &ndash;Dan Sullivan, CINEMA SCOPE<br /><br />Plus:<br />BROKEN SPECS (2012, 6 min, Super-16mm-to-35mm)<br />TRAVEL PLANS (2013, 7 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br />GOING OUT (2015, 8 min, 16mm-to-35mm)<br /><br />Total running time: ca. 85 min.</p> Saturday, December 17